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Old 11-08-2018, 01:28 PM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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It's easier than you think! What should we try that assume is too hard?

We all know someone who says something like "Calculus? Oh, I do that in my head while I'm giving improvised violin recitals. You should try it." Belittling arrogant humblebrags. That's NOT what this is. This is about unlocking some skills, about realising how easy it is to do things we've been falsely led to believe are too much hassle.

I make my own bread. Lots of people think it's too much hassle, takes too long, takes more practice than they can be bothered with. Well, OK, from beginning to end, yes, it takes hours, but your own involvement is simple and minimal. It's almost all just waiting. I can walk you through it, if you like.

What else are we all missing? What else has a needless reputation for difficulty? What do you do that somehow impresses people, but which to you is no more impressive than being able to ride a bike?
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Old 11-08-2018, 01:36 PM
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I make a consistent long-term profit gambling. It's all just a matter of taking casino and bookmaker offers that have a +EV, playing perfect strategy on table games; apart from poker, which I don't play, they can all be easily learned; and low overround bets on sports (and the overround can be easily calculated, no sports knowledge needed)

Last edited by Mr Shine; 11-08-2018 at 01:38 PM.
  #3  
Old 11-08-2018, 01:42 PM
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manson1972 manson1972 is offline
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Originally Posted by Yorkshire Pudding View Post
I make my own bread. Lots of people think it's too much hassle, takes too long, takes more practice than they can be bothered with. Well, OK, from beginning to end, yes, it takes hours, but your own involvement is simple and minimal. It's almost all just waiting. I can walk you through it, if you like.
People think making bread is hard? Isn't it just dumping some ingredients into a bread maker and waiting?
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Old 11-08-2018, 01:51 PM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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I make a consistent long-term profit gambling. It's all just a matter of taking casino and bookmaker offers that have a +EV, playing perfect strategy on table games; apart from poker, which I don't play, they can all be easily learned; and low overround bets on sports (and the overround can be easily calculated, no sports knowledge needed)
Good one. I had a boss years ago who told me - a total non gambler - the rules of what overround was permitted for UK bookies, and therefore how to spot strangely long odds. More sports knowledge needed of course, but as sports was his thing, he could spot an unlikely looking price on a fairly obscure team/horse buried a long way down the list, made a tidy long-term profit.
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Old 11-08-2018, 01:52 PM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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People think making bread is hard? Isn't it just dumping some ingredients into a bread maker and waiting?
I am not going to bite...
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Old 11-08-2018, 01:55 PM
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Making pizza from scratch is so easy, I could live on it.
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Old 11-08-2018, 02:02 PM
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What do you do that somehow impresses people, but which to you is no more impressive than being able to ride a bike?
You know what's no more impressive than riding a bike? Riding a bike. A lot of people are impressed when they find out that I commute by bicycle, and sometimes even say things like "I wish I could do that". You can. Seriously, I'm about the least athletic person you'll ever meet. If I can do it, everyone can.
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Old 11-08-2018, 02:09 PM
Kimstu Kimstu is offline
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In order of increasing difficulty, from "stupid easy and quick with a few easily-learned basic skills" to "requires some study and practice but is nowhere near the arcane magical art that many people think":

1) Mending clothes

2) Altering clothes

3) Making clothes
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Old 11-08-2018, 02:11 PM
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I don't know why people think Russian is hard to learn. As far as languages go, it's dead easy---there are lots of rules, but they're all very regular. Latin and Czech, on the other hand, are nightmares---far more complicated and extremely arbitrary.
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Old 11-08-2018, 02:15 PM
Dallas Jones Dallas Jones is offline
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Simple car maintenance. Like changing the oil, filters, belts, hoses, etc. The kind of thing that a lot of people used to do on their own.

A person with some average mechanical skills and tools who used to do these sort of things pops the hood on a newer car and all you see is a plastic engine shroud. Can't even tell where things are or what they look like. Closes hood and takes it back to the shop. There is a reason for these engine covers and that is to convince you that you cannot work on your own car any more. Take the plastic cover off and you see a more familiar looking engine. If anything, modern car engines are even more plug-and-play than they used to be. Nobody rebuilds a carburetor anymore, they don't exist. Plug wires too have mostly disappeared in favor of coil-on-plug designs. Wheel bearings are no longer packed with grease, they are sealed units that you unbolt and bolt in the new one. The real mechanical knowledge you need now is identifying the problem or part. But after you have identified the issue, it is all plug-and-play.

Plastic engine covers are a great profit engine for car repair and dealerships. Open the hood, take one look, "Nope!" Back to the dealer.
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Old 11-08-2018, 02:18 PM
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I am not going to bite...
Sorry, it's not a gotcha. I just never knew that people thought making bread was hard.
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Old 11-08-2018, 02:26 PM
Kimstu Kimstu is offline
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Sorry, it's not a gotcha. I just never knew that people thought making bread was hard.
Before the widespread use of breadmaking machines, yes, many people (incorrectly) thought that making bread was a difficult art, and many people still think that about making bread "by hand", that is, without a machine.

I make bread without a machine and it impresses the heck out of a lot of people who don't know any better. (It also tastes better than most machine-made bread.)
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Old 11-08-2018, 02:28 PM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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Sorry, it's not a gotcha. I just never knew that people thought making bread was hard.
That's encouraging. "I love to cook but anything floury is not for me" seems pretty common in my experience.
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Old 11-08-2018, 02:33 PM
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Before the widespread use of breadmaking machines, yes, many people (incorrectly) thought that making bread was a difficult art, and many people still think that about making bread "by hand", that is, without a machine.

I make bread without a machine and it impresses the heck out of a lot of people who don't know any better. (It also tastes better than most machine-made bread.)
Yes, this, exactly this. "Ah, but I haven't got a bread maker" is not an uncommon response to the suggestion that bread might be makable.
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Old 11-08-2018, 02:37 PM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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Originally Posted by Dallas Jones View Post
Simple car maintenance. Like changing the oil, filters, belts, hoses, etc. The kind of thing that a lot of people used to do on their own.

A person with some average mechanical skills and tools who used to do these sort of things pops the hood on a newer car and all you see is a plastic engine shroud. Can't even tell where things are or what they look like. Closes hood and takes it back to the shop. There is a reason for these engine covers and that is to convince you that you cannot work on your own car any more. Take the plastic cover off and you see a more familiar looking engine. If anything, modern car engines are even more plug-and-play than they used to be. Nobody rebuilds a carburetor anymore, they don't exist. Plug wires too have mostly disappeared in favor of coil-on-plug designs. Wheel bearings are no longer packed with grease, they are sealed units that you unbolt and bolt in the new one. The real mechanical knowledge you need now is identifying the problem or part. But after you have identified the issue, it is all plug-and-play.

Plastic engine covers are a great profit engine for car repair and dealerships. Open the hood, take one look, "Nope!" Back to the dealer.
Good point. I'm much happier to rummage around and do things to my 30 year old van than my 8 year old (plastic shrouded) car. I was reduced to having only 3rd, 4th and reverse at the start of a long journey in the van; had a hunt around, bolted the linkages back together, drove on across Europe. I'd have had the car towed home.
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Old 11-08-2018, 03:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Kimstu View Post
Before the widespread use of breadmaking machines, yes, many people (incorrectly) thought that making bread was a difficult art, and many people still think that about making bread "by hand", that is, without a machine.

I make bread without a machine and it impresses the heck out of a lot of people who don't know any better. (It also tastes better than most machine-made bread.)
Many people think that cooking almost anything from scratch is "difficult", because they really know little or nothing about cooking. They may not even have the vaguest idea as to the process if it's not printed on a jar of something they got from the store.

Case in point: It takes about 30 seconds to make homemade whipped cream, and only a few minutes to make homemade butter. But people have never thought about the process or how they could do it at home--these are things they buy pre-made, so they assume some sort of elaborate process is involved.
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Old 11-08-2018, 03:38 PM
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You know what else is incredibly easy? Chicken stock. Ten times better than any stock you can buy. I make about a gallon and half from one chicken's bones, some onions and carrots and celery. Freeze it up in quart containers. I don't know how people make soup or brown sauce or many other things, without it.

Speaking as someone who made my own bread for years, making bread is far more arduous. It isn't hard but there are strenuous messy parts, and you do have to be around for about half a day, at the right times.

A summer I lived on a farm, I churned about 200 lbs of butter (they only made butter in the summer as grass butter tastes better than hay butter). There is a trick to making butter -- the temperature has to be within about a 5 degrees range, otherwise it won't churn up right. Needs a dairy thermometer. If the temp is right it is a quick process.

Last edited by Ulfreida; 11-08-2018 at 03:41 PM.
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Old 11-08-2018, 03:50 PM
Aspidistra Aspidistra is offline
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Cutting hair. Most people would never dare to pick up those scissors for the first time because ZOMG what if I get it WRONG! My friend will KILL me!

Actually a bob, trim, or short back and sides is incredibly straightforward, as long as you're not trying for anything fancy. I cut everyone's hair in my family despite having some of the worst manual dexterity known to mankind.
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Old 11-08-2018, 04:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Yorkshire Pudding View Post
That's encouraging. "I love to cook but anything floury is not for me" seems pretty common in my experience.
To be fair, technically speaking, making bread isn't cooking, it's baking.

As I've had it explained to me, on several occasions -- cooking is art, baking is science. In cooking, you can play with proportions, change ingredients, etc., and while you may wind up with something unpalatable, it's harder to flat-out ruin something.

In baking, on the the other hand, you're often seeking to cause a chemical reaction (such as leavening), and that reaction depends on the proportions of your ingredients (and the process itself) being just right. Get those wrong (or err when you're trying to ad-lib in a baking recipe), and it's more possible to wind up with something that simply fails.
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Old 11-08-2018, 04:41 PM
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Speaking as someone who made my own bread for years, making bread is far more arduous. It isn't hard but there are strenuous messy parts, and you do have to be around for about half a day, at the right times.
Assuming Yorkshire Pudding comes from Yorkshire, and therefore enjoys all the benefits of Yorkshire weather, there are going to be quite a few days when he/she is going to be stuck indoors for half a day.

It applies to most of the UK, to be fair. I've already marked Friday down for making sourdough.

j
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Old 11-08-2018, 04:56 PM
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To be fair, technically speaking, making bread isn't cooking, it's baking.

As I've had it explained to me, on several occasions -- cooking is art, baking is science. In cooking, you can play with proportions, change ingredients, etc., and while you may wind up with something unpalatable, it's harder to flat-out ruin something.

In baking, on the the other hand, you're often seeking to cause a chemical reaction (such as leavening), and that reaction depends on the proportions of your ingredients (and the process itself) being just right. Get those wrong (or err when you're trying to ad-lib in a baking recipe), and it's more possible to wind up with something that simply fails.
Baking is Science for Hungry People!

https://www.google.com/search?q=baki...wQbdkH5RXON-M:
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Old 11-08-2018, 05:56 PM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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Assuming Yorkshire Pudding comes from Yorkshire

j
Guilty as charged.
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Old 11-08-2018, 06:09 PM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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To be fair, technically speaking, making bread isn't cooking, it's baking.

As I've had it explained to me, on several occasions -- cooking is art, baking is science. In cooking, you can play with proportions, change ingredients, etc., and while you may wind up with something unpalatable, it's harder to flat-out ruin something.

In baking, on the the other hand, you're often seeking to cause a chemical reaction (such as leavening), and that reaction depends on the proportions of your ingredients (and the process itself) being just right. Get those wrong (or err when you're trying to ad-lib in a baking recipe), and it's more possible to wind up with something that simply fails.
Well, yeah, baking and cooking might be regarded as different things, but it surprises me still that what was all - until recently - general sort of kitchen-craft is now so divided.

And that cooking = art/baking = science thing? Don't buy it. I've read that in bread books which then go on to say "but if the dough's too dry - flours vary - add more water until it feels softer" or similar. I've frequently oiled my hands repeatedly while kneading dough, until the texture feels right. Mrs YP knows how much kirsch to put in the cherry frangipane filling of my favourite dessert by the pitch of the food-mixer's whine as the mixture loosens. I've never once measured the amount of liquid that goes into my pastry: I know how feels when there's enough.
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Old 11-08-2018, 06:21 PM
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Juggling. I'm about the most uncoordinated doofus there is, and I learned how to juggle in an afternoon from one of those Klutz books that a college roommate had. It's not nearly as difficult as people think.
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Old 11-08-2018, 06:55 PM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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Reckon I could teach most people to - passably at least - play the drums. It's really not the impossible "doing loads of different things at once" exercise that it initially appears.
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Old 11-08-2018, 06:57 PM
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Making pizza from scratch is so easy, I could live on it.
I remember a thread a while back where people were talking about making their own pizza crust. So last time I went to the store I bought some bread flour and was reaching for the yeast when... hey, what's this? "Pizza crust yeast"! Which makes it even easier, because you don't have to wait for it to rise, you just make the dough ball and roll it out. And my granddaughter loves to help, which is great because for some reason I've never been able to get any of the grandkids interested in cooking.

Next I'll try making my own pizza sauce.
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Old 11-08-2018, 07:05 PM
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In order of increasing difficulty, from "stupid easy and quick with a few easily-learned basic skills" to "requires some study and practice but is nowhere near the arcane magical art that many people think":

1) Mending clothes

2) Altering clothes

3) Making clothes
I agree with this. And darning socks or knit sweaters is also very simple.
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Old 11-08-2018, 07:06 PM
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Cutting hair. Most people would never dare to pick up those scissors for the first time because ZOMG what if I get it WRONG! My friend will KILL me!

Actually a bob, trim, or short back and sides is incredibly straightforward, as long as you're not trying for anything fancy. I cut everyone's hair in my family despite having some of the worst manual dexterity known to mankind.
I've cut my family's hair for decades. I won't cut my own though.
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Old 11-08-2018, 07:24 PM
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To be fair, technically speaking, making bread isn't cooking, it's baking.

As I've had it explained to me, on several occasions -- cooking is art, baking is science. In cooking, you can play with proportions, change ingredients, etc., and while you may wind up with something unpalatable, it's harder to flat-out ruin something.

In baking, on the the other hand, you're often seeking to cause a chemical reaction (such as leavening), and that reaction depends on the proportions of your ingredients (and the process itself) being just right. Get those wrong (or err when you're trying to ad-lib in a baking recipe), and it's more possible to wind up with something that simply fails.
But for all its difficulties, baking bread is not that kind of baking that is a science. You just mix up some stuff, wait, mix, wait, kneed, wait, bake. If you get the ingredients wrong, you still get bread. If you wait too long, or not long enough, you still get bread.

You get different kinds of bread: sweet, sour, heavy, soggy, tough, soft, crumbly etc. But it's still bread, and it's still (mostly) edible.

Oven temperature is important, but, from memory, not more difficult than when making pancakes or boiling eggs.

Certainly when I was making bread as a teenager, I didn't measure anything.
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Old 11-08-2018, 09:04 PM
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I remember a thread a while back where people were talking about making their own pizza crust. So last time I went to the store I bought some bread flour and was reaching for the yeast when... hey, what's this? "Pizza crust yeast"! Which makes it even easier, because you don't have to wait for it to rise, you just make the dough ball and roll it out. And my granddaughter loves to help, which is great because for some reason I've never been able to get any of the grandkids interested in cooking.

Next I'll try making my own pizza sauce.
To make the crust, all you need is flour, yeast, a lot of good olive oil, some warm water, and salt. That's it. I was once forced to make crust without yeast, and it turned out alright. If you let dough sit for a while, it'll rise a little on its own, without yeast. Nothing wrong with a crisp crust.

Contrary to what most people think, you needn't cook pizza sauce. You can just mix the ingredients cold. I use a can of crushed tomatoes, a can of diced tomatoes, a small can of tomato paste, some olive oil, and some crushed garlic and Italian seasoning. Basil and oregano are mandatory, but I make my own blend that also contains parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme. This is enough for six or seven good-sized pizzas. If you want to get fancy-shmancy, you can stir in some wine (red or white) and grated Parmesan cheese.
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Last edited by terentii; 11-08-2018 at 09:04 PM.
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Old 11-08-2018, 09:33 PM
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The thing with baking is, different ingredients serve different purposes. Some of those ingredients, yes, you need scientific precision with. If your recipe includes baking soda, then the amount of that is critical, and there's going to be at least one other ingredient (an acid of some sort) whose amount is also critical. But most ingredients are just going to affect the texture (flaky or crumbly or firm or airy or whatever), and different people will prefer different values of those anyway. And a good number of ingredients are entirely for flavor, and can be tripled or left out entirely as you prefer.
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Old 11-08-2018, 10:19 PM
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Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
To be fair, technically speaking, making bread isn't cooking, it's baking.

As I've had it explained to me, on several occasions -- cooking is art, baking is science. In cooking, you can play with proportions, change ingredients, etc., and while you may wind up with something unpalatable, it's harder to flat-out ruin something.

In baking, on the the other hand, you're often seeking to cause a chemical reaction (such as leavening), and that reaction depends on the proportions of your ingredients (and the process itself) being just right. Get those wrong (or err when you're trying to ad-lib in a baking recipe), and it's more possible to wind up with something that simply fails.
as a baker and a chef...
you are 100% correct.

tsfr
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Old 11-08-2018, 10:23 PM
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To make the crust, all you need is flour, yeast, a lot of good olive oil, some warm water, and salt. That's it. I was once forced to make crust without yeast, and it turned out alright. If you let dough sit for a while, it'll rise a little on its own, without yeast. Nothing wrong with a crisp crust.

Contrary to what most people think, you needn't cook pizza sauce. You can just mix the ingredients cold. I use a can of crushed tomatoes, a can of diced tomatoes, a small can of tomato paste, some olive oil, and some crushed garlic and Italian seasoning. Basil and oregano are mandatory, but I make my own blend that also contains parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme. This is enough for six or seven good-sized pizzas. If you want to get fancy-shmancy, you can stir in some wine (red or white) and grated Parmesan cheese.
so correct on so many points...
I would add....make your dough three days out and let it ferment.

ymmv.

thisspaceforrent
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Old 11-09-2018, 02:45 AM
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as a baker and a chef...
you are 100% correct.

tsfr
But see, you're a supplier and a chef. You're trying to get the same thing every time, not just trying to get something interesting and good to eat.

Also, of course sour-dough it even more of an art than yeast-risen bread.
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Old 11-09-2018, 03:04 AM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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To make the crust, all you need is flour, yeast, a lot of good olive oil, some warm water, and salt.
Actually, I'd contend that the oil is a) optional, b) not needed in huge quantities if opted for and c) need not be particularly good. I do use oil, but I have it on good authority from a Neapolitan chef that I needn't (and that proper old-school Italian pizza doesn't feature it).

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Basil and oregano are mandatory
The classic method is to use a tin of San Marzano tomatoes and absolutely nothing else. I use cheapo supermarket own-brand tinned tomatoes which are nothing like as flavoursome, and therefore boil them down with (at least) salt, pepper, garlic-infused olive oil, basil and oregano to enhance and intensify flavour. But honestly, keeping it as simple and unadulterated as possible is best if you've got the good stuff.
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Old 11-09-2018, 04:15 AM
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Juggling. I'm about the most uncoordinated doofus there is, and I learned how to juggle in an afternoon from one of those Klutz books that a college roommate had. It's not nearly as difficult as people think.
I'm gonna argue a bit with that- learning to juggle 3 things is indeed very easy. You can learn that in a few hours of practice even if you're pretty uncoordinated, maybe even with a few tricks. 4 isn't bad either, you can probably get the simplest pattern within a week. This means a lot of people who have tried get that far and think 'juggling is easy!' and sneer at pro jugglers.

No, juggling 3 or 4 is easy, after that, the difficulty goes up exponentially (through the odd numbers, even numbers involve a different set of throwing patterns and generally aren't so much of a step up). Most people can just about juggle 5 with 6 months to a year of determined practice, many people who've been juggling for decades still can't get 7. There are probably only around 10 people on the planet who can reliably juggle 9, and no-one has ever managed more than a 'qualify'* of 11 (that is, throwing each ball and catching it twice- once is a 'flash').

*OK, technically the record is 23 catches, so a qualify -22- plus one.
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Old 11-09-2018, 04:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Filbert View Post
I'm gonna argue a bit with that- learning to juggle 3 things is indeed very easy. You can learn that in a few hours of practice even if you're pretty uncoordinated, maybe even with a few tricks. 4 isn't bad either, you can probably get the simplest pattern within a week. This means a lot of people who have tried get that far and think 'juggling is easy!' and sneer at pro jugglers.

No, juggling 3 or 4 is easy, after that, the difficulty goes up exponentially (through the odd numbers, even numbers involve a different set of throwing patterns and generally aren't so much of a step up). Most people can just about juggle 5 with 6 months to a year of determined practice, many people who've been juggling for decades still can't get 7. There are probably only around 10 people on the planet who can reliably juggle 9, and no-one has ever managed more than a 'qualify'* of 11 (that is, throwing each ball and catching it twice- once is a 'flash').

*OK, technically the record is 23 catches, so a qualify -22- plus one.
I don't that viewpoint needs to be an argument though, really. The initial mention of juggling is fair enough: "basic juggling is easier than many people think" seems to be the long and short of it. Saying that basic juggling is easy while complex juggling is much harder doesn't really contradict that.

Last edited by Yorkshire Pudding; 11-09-2018 at 05:01 AM.
  #38  
Old 11-09-2018, 05:08 AM
madmonk28 madmonk28 is offline
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People think fly fishing is complicated and expensive. It can be, but it can also be very straightforward and affordable. It’s one of those hobbies you can ramp up and go crazy with, but it can also be very accessible. The problem is knowing where to start and tuning out a lot of the jargon.
  #39  
Old 11-09-2018, 05:16 AM
Filbert Filbert is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yorkshire Pudding View Post
I don't that viewpoint needs to be an argument though, really. The initial mention of juggling is fair enough: "basic juggling is easier than many people think" seems to be the long and short of it. Saying that basic juggling is easy while complex juggling is much harder doesn't really contradict that.
It's just a bit too broad- it's like saying 'Cooking is easy!' Well, yeah, it can be, but not all of it is, as people have pointed out in this thread.

I reckon most people would guess the world record would be higher than 11 items, and the learning curve is a hell of a lot steeper than it first appears to beginners.

I have a few friends who are pro jugglers, and they've all said they've had the reaction of 'That's not impressive, juggling's easy, I learnt to juggle in a weekend' from people, when they're performing something that took 10 years to perfect.
  #40  
Old 11-09-2018, 05:36 AM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is offline
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Originally Posted by Yorkshire Pudding View Post
The classic method is to use a tin of San Marzano tomatoes and absolutely nothing else. I use cheapo supermarket own-brand tinned tomatoes which are nothing like as flavoursome, and therefore boil them down with (at least) salt, pepper, garlic-infused olive oil, basil and oregano to enhance and intensify flavour. But honestly, keeping it as simple and unadulterated as possible is best if you've got the good stuff.
YOU ARE ME, GET OUT OF MY HOUSE!

but yes, as far as pizza goes the quality of the bread is the thing, simple toppings should enhance the bread not overwhelm it (and fresh yeast is best )

One thing I always recommend people to try is hiring a car on holiday. Swapping to the other side of the road is far, far easier than people assume. If you can drive on the crowded, narrow, fast roads of the UK you can drive anywhere.

The other thing that amazes me is that, though I live right down in the south-east of England about 15 minutes from the channel crossings, very few of our friends or acquaintances actually take their car to the continent. They worry about the "other side of the road" thing. It honestly takes about 5 minutes to get used to it, maybe less.
  #41  
Old 11-09-2018, 05:40 AM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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Originally Posted by Filbert View Post
It's just a bit too broad- it's like saying 'Cooking is easy!' Well, yeah, it can be, but not all of it is, as people have pointed out in this thread.

I reckon most people would guess the world record would be higher than 11 items, and the learning curve is a hell of a lot steeper than it first appears to beginners.

I have a few friends who are pro jugglers, and they've all said they've had the reaction of 'That's not impressive, juggling's easy, I learnt to juggle in a weekend' from people, when they're performing something that took 10 years to perfect.
Fair point: didn't know there was a widespread "juggling's easy" viewpoint! In my experience, people think it's all superhero-grade impossibility.
  #42  
Old 11-09-2018, 05:45 AM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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Originally Posted by Novelty Bobble View Post
YOU ARE ME, GET OUT OF MY HOUSE!

but yes, as far as pizza goes the quality of the bread is the thing, simple toppings should enhance the bread not overwhelm it (and fresh yeast is best )

One thing I always recommend people to try is hiring a car on holiday. Swapping to the other side of the road is far, far easier than people assume. If you can drive on the crowded, narrow, fast roads of the UK you can drive anywhere.

The other thing that amazes me is that, though I live right down in the south-east of England about 15 minutes from the channel crossings, very few of our friends or acquaintances actually take their car to the continent. They worry about the "other side of the road" thing. It honestly takes about 5 minutes to get used to it, maybe less.
NO YOU GET OUT!

I find driving on the other side of the car more awkward than driving on the other side of the road: my spatial awareness is trained for a vehicle extending away to my left, not my right. Even then though, it doesn't take long.
  #43  
Old 11-09-2018, 06:08 AM
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I had to replace the sump pump in my basement, and didn't feel like calling a plumber. I went to the hardware store and bought a new pump (lifetime warranty!), 4 ft. or so of replacement pvc pipe and a few rubber connectors that had hose clamps built in. None of that was hard at all. The only thing I missed was the glue used for pvc, the 2 stage stuff, one's a primer and the other is a glue. My neighbor set me straight on that, he even had it in his garage.
I drained the residual water from the old pump setup, hacksawed through the pipe in an arbitrary place that I felt would be easy to reach, and pulled the whole works out of the pit. I took the new pump with freshly glued pcv connected, and hacksawed through the pipe at a place that would make the overall height from the floor to the cut the same as the one I removed from the pit.
Put the new one in the pit, connect to the existing piping with one of the rubber/hose clamp connectors. Done.
Nowhere near as difficult as I initially feared.
  #44  
Old 11-09-2018, 07:00 AM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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Originally Posted by bobot View Post
I had to replace the sump pump in my basement, and didn't feel like calling a plumber. I went to the hardware store and bought a new pump (lifetime warranty!), 4 ft. or so of replacement pvc pipe and a few rubber connectors that had hose clamps built in. None of that was hard at all. The only thing I missed was the glue used for pvc, the 2 stage stuff, one's a primer and the other is a glue. My neighbor set me straight on that, he even had it in his garage.
I drained the residual water from the old pump setup, hacksawed through the pipe in an arbitrary place that I felt would be easy to reach, and pulled the whole works out of the pit. I took the new pump with freshly glued pcv connected, and hacksawed through the pipe at a place that would make the overall height from the floor to the cut the same as the one I removed from the pit.
Put the new one in the pit, connect to the existing piping with one of the rubber/hose clamp connectors. Done.
Nowhere near as difficult as I initially feared.
There must be loads of things like this. Plumbing can be so disastrous when done badly that it seems like it's best left alone, but with info about which bits are easy, sawing and reconnecting pipes needn't always be regarded as witchcraft!
  #45  
Old 11-09-2018, 10:11 AM
SkyRangerRich SkyRangerRich is offline
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I have my Private Pilot's Licence and own my own aircraft.

People think that private aviation is reserved for the very wealthy. I'm a 36 year old man from Yorkshire with a regular job and a young family. My pilot pals are made up of a pest exterminator, a builder and a car mechanic - all also own aircraft.

Learning to fly was remarkably easy, I had a lesson a week and it took about 10 months.

My aircraft has two seats, cruises at about 100mph, a range of over 600 miles and cost less than people spend on a decent car.

If you've ever fancied flying an aeroplane, go for it, it's remarkable accessible.
  #46  
Old 11-09-2018, 11:31 AM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is offline
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Originally Posted by SkyRangerRich View Post
If you've ever fancied flying an aeroplane, go for it, it's remarkable accessible.
Sure but your username does seem to give off a different message!

  #47  
Old 11-09-2018, 11:37 AM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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Originally Posted by SkyRangerRich View Post
I have my Private Pilot's Licence and own my own aircraft.

People think that private aviation is reserved for the very wealthy. I'm a 36 year old man from Yorkshire with a regular job and a young family. My pilot pals are made up of a pest exterminator, a builder and a car mechanic - all also own aircraft.

Learning to fly was remarkably easy, I had a lesson a week and it took about 10 months.

My aircraft has two seats, cruises at about 100mph, a range of over 600 miles and cost less than people spend on a decent car.

If you've ever fancied flying an aeroplane, go for it, it's remarkable accessible.
Wow. Really? That's got to be worth a look!

I'm an only-ever-so-very-slightly older than you man from Yorkshire with a regular job and a young family. I haven't got a great deal of excuse...
  #48  
Old 11-09-2018, 11:41 AM
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puddleglum puddleglum is offline
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Originally Posted by Yorkshire Pudding View Post
Good one. I had a boss years ago who told me - a total non gambler - the rules of what overround was permitted for UK bookies, and therefore how to spot strangely long odds. More sports knowledge needed of course, but as sports was his thing, he could spot an unlikely looking price on a fairly obscure team/horse buried a long way down the list, made a tidy long-term profit.
Could you explain this? It sounds interesting and like it should be impossible.
  #49  
Old 11-09-2018, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Shoeless View Post
Juggling. I'm about the most uncoordinated doofus there is, and I learned how to juggle in an afternoon from one of those Klutz books that a college roommate had. It's not nearly as difficult as people think.
I tried the same way, using a learn to juggle book, and practicing against a wall. I still couldn't do it.
  #50  
Old 11-09-2018, 01:01 PM
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terentii terentii is offline
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Originally Posted by Yorkshire Pudding View Post
Actually, I'd contend that the oil is a) optional, b) not needed in huge quantities if opted for and c) need not be particularly good. I do use oil, but I have it on good authority from a Neapolitan chef that I needn't (and that proper old-school Italian pizza doesn't feature it).

The classic method is to use a tin of San Marzano tomatoes and absolutely nothing else. I use cheapo supermarket own-brand tinned tomatoes which are nothing like as flavoursome, and therefore boil them down with (at least) salt, pepper, garlic-infused olive oil, basil and oregano to enhance and intensify flavour. But honestly, keeping it as simple and unadulterated as possible is best if you've got the good stuff.
For "classic," I'd substitute "rustic," which is also good. I can go either way, but I do love me some quality olive oil.

I used to have a pizza cookbook that said the tomatoes should be crushed ("smuhsed") in a pan with butter and salt and pepper. Diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks.
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