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Old 11-16-2018, 06:48 PM
CastletonSnob CastletonSnob is offline
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Hanna-Barbera.

What are your thoughts on Hanna-Barbera? On one hand, they did make Tom and Jerry, which was genuinely good, they essentially created the animated sitcom with Flintstones and Wait Till Your Father Gets Home, and Butch Hartman and Seth MacFarlane came from HB. On the other hand, they made a lot of cheaply animated cartoons and recycled a lot of their own premises. I mean, how many times did they copy the Scooby-Doo formula?
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Old 11-16-2018, 07:17 PM
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The worst Hanna-Barbera show I watched was the Scooby Doo crossover show. Let's face it even the campy 60's Batman was too serious for this show and it showed. Most of the shows I've seen were fairly decent. Let's be honest here Hanna Barbera didn't invent recycling ideas.
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Old 11-16-2018, 07:22 PM
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What they perfected though was cutting costs by recycling cells, starting with scrolling backgrounds and then reusing character cells as well. They drove dialogue driven cartoons.
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Old 11-16-2018, 07:27 PM
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HB was a TV animation factory, and most of their output was pretty dire. Who remembers Peter Potamus, Magilla Gorilla, Lippy the Lion (and Har-de-Har Har), Snooper and Blabber, Augie Doggie and Doggie Daddy, or Yakky Doodle ? Even their better known product was pretty mediocre. Unlike Jay Ward, they didn't use the limits of their budget as a chance to write creative scripts. Instead they stuck to repetitive jokes and plots.

Their best -- probably The Flintstones -- waw no more than just OK. The Jetsons were just the Flintstones in the future and wasn't as good (primarily because The Flintstones concentrated on the Flintstones at home where George Jetson spent most episodes at work.

Scooby Doo was pretty bad, but I had outgrown HB long before it came on.
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Old 11-16-2018, 07:30 PM
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Originally Posted by CastletonSnob View Post
What are your thoughts on Hanna-Barbera? On one hand, they did make Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry was Hanna and Barbera, but not Hanna-Barbera. They created them when they were working at MGM, before creating their own studio.

HB's properties are currently owned by Warner Brothers, while T&J are still owned by MGM.

Anyway...HB is hit and miss. The reuses of the Scooby-Doo formula generally don't work, but the Yogiverse is generally mediocre to good, Wacky Races was way better than it deserved it be, Flintstones and Jetsons were solid, if not overly sparkling sitcoms, and Scooby's all over the place.

But the Hanna-Barbera Beyond and HB/DCU crossover comics justify the existence of the source material.
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Old 11-16-2018, 07:55 PM
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Tom and Jerry was Hanna and Barbera, but not Hanna-Barbera. They created them when they were working at MGM, before creating their own studio.

HB's properties are currently owned by Warner Brothers, while T&J are still owned by MGM.

Anyway...HB is hit and miss. The reuses of the Scooby-Doo formula generally don't work, but the Yogiverse is generally mediocre to good, Wacky Races was way better than it deserved it be, Flintstones and Jetsons were solid, if not overly sparkling sitcoms, and Scooby's all over the place.

But the Hanna-Barbera Beyond and HB/DCU crossover comics justify the existence of the source material.
One thing I was not aware of until recently is Wacky Races was supposed to be a kid's game show. That's why HB co-produced it with Heather-Quigley Productions who were also responsible for The Hollywood Squares. The cartoon segments were to be interspersed with a taped live-action portion featuring child contestants placing bets on who would be the winner. However, children's TV watchdogs objected when they found out about the premise since it condoned minors gambling and the game show aspect was quickly scrapped in favor of the all-animated show we know now.

As for Hanna-Barbera, it's been said often they were the McDonalds of animation. I can't disagree with that assessment.
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Old 11-16-2018, 07:59 PM
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Huckleberry Hound, Yogi Bear and Quickdraw McGraw were great. Everything else, meh. Except Snagglepuss. And Space Ghost.
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Old 11-16-2018, 08:13 PM
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Huckleberry Hound, Yogi Bear and Quickdraw McGraw were great. Everything else, meh. Except Snagglepuss. And Space Ghost.
These were among my favorites growing up. I still use "Exit - stage left" and "Heavens to Murgatroid" which totally baffles my students.
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Old 11-16-2018, 08:21 PM
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The Hanna-Barbera studios were two blocks from where I used to live in the Cahuenga Pass of Los Angeles in the 1970's. I once met one of their inkers at the local laundromat, who told me that the bean counters were so ubiquitous that she was scolded for using purple paint instead of blue to color in the character's clothes, since purple paint cost more. Heavens to Murgatroid, Snagglepuss!
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Old 11-16-2018, 09:57 PM
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My favorite HB creation is Arabian Knights.
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Old 11-16-2018, 10:44 PM
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Why has no one mentioned "Jonny Quest"? It was the rose plucked from the mountain of cartoon crap.
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Old 11-16-2018, 10:51 PM
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I was introduced to the wide cast of H-B by way of the Laff-A-Lympics on the USA Network in the 80s. I have pleasant memories of watching it. I especially liked Grape Ape. I don't reckon I'd find it to be high-class entertainment if I saw it again these days.

I also liked Scooby-Doo, the Jetsons and Flintstones as a kid. But beyond those shows and the Laff-A-Lympics, I don't have much to say about H-B cartoons.

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Old 11-16-2018, 10:55 PM
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I was watching a YouTube video compilation of 60s and 70s Saturday morning cartoons, and let me tell you, Filmation made Hanna-Barbera look like Disney-Pixar. They uncanny-valleyed everything by overuse of rotoscoping.
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Old 11-16-2018, 10:59 PM
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^ Filmation=suckfest
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Old 11-16-2018, 11:14 PM
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Hanna-Barbera's finest hour was probably Jonny Quest.

The 70s in particular were a dismal time for American animation. H-B, Ruby-Spears, Filmation, and DePatie-Freleng were in a race to the bottom to see who could produce shows for the Saturday morning network cartoon ghetto the quickest and the cheapest.
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Old 11-16-2018, 11:48 PM
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I found Jonny Quest to be too serious to rate my attention. Cartoons are simply moving comix, and comix are supposed to be FUNNY!
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Old 11-17-2018, 12:10 AM
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I loved the Banana Splits and all the animation shorts they had. The Arabian Knights and Danger Island and The Three Musketeers and Gulliver's Travels (my favorite character was Glum, who kept saying, "It'll never work." NO ONE GETS IT when I say that.). And I loved Yankee Doodle Pigeon and Penelope Pitstop and ...

OK, whaddaya want. I grew up on 70s cartoon shows.
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Old 11-17-2018, 02:48 AM
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Few people remember The Jetsons was actually a commercial failure as it was cancelled after one season of 24 episodes in 1962. It was only when they brought it back in the mid-80's with 50 new episodes that it became a success.
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Old 11-17-2018, 03:19 AM
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What are your thoughts on Hanna-Barbera? On one hand, they did make Tom and Jerry, which was genuinely good, they essentially created the animated sitcom with Flintstones and Wait Till Your Father Gets Home, and Butch Hartman and Seth MacFarlane came from HB. On the other hand, they made a lot of cheaply animated cartoons and recycled a lot of their own premises. I mean, how many times did they copy the Scooby-Doo formula?
I think that my initial impression, as a kid, was that the animation sucked. Pretty soon after I determined that plot-wise, I'd encountered everything they had to offer.

Between watching The Flintstones or going outside, I'd probably go outside.
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Old 11-17-2018, 03:58 AM
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Few people remember The Jetsons was actually a commercial failure as it was cancelled after one season of 24 episodes in 1962. It was only when they brought it back in the mid-80's with 50 new episodes that it became a success.
Between the 60s and the 80s, The Jetsons were rerun on Saturday mornings which is where the show picked up its following.

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Huckleberry Hound, Yogi Bear and Quickdraw McGraw were great. Everything else, meh.
In retrospect, the H-B shows from the late 50s were actually fairly good. Not as good as Jay Ward's subversive animation from the same period but there was still a glint of wit to them that was mostly absent from the stuff they later churned out for Saturday morning.
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Old 11-17-2018, 04:11 AM
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The 70s in particular were a dismal time for American animation. H-B, Ruby-Spears, Filmation, and DePatie-Freleng were in a race to the bottom to see who could produce shows for the Saturday morning network cartoon ghetto the quickest and the cheapest.
This, and it continued in the 80s, although the forces that turned two decades into a cartoon wasteland were not limited to budget and speed. Moralists trying to "sanitize" cartoons and the half-hour toy commercials played their part. I was a child of the 70s and 80s, but I was exposed to better quality cartoons first--classic Looney Tunes, the good Tom & Jerry cartoons, even Rocky and Bullwinkle. Consequently, even as a kid, I was aware that the quality of cartoons had taken a dive in terms of animation, humor, and storytelling. Cartoons were cripplingly infantilized. They were almost universally some combination of saccharine, badly animated, and obnoxiously repetitive (not to mention often direly stupid). I mostly watched and rewatched old cartoons and ignored the new ones.

The 90s saw a cartoon renaissance. Animation started to improve, and cartoons were allowed to have serious themes and actual stories again. And, although I dislike most of Hanna-Barbera's productions, I have to give credit where it's due: I think one of the first attempts to get the revolution rolling was an H-B production, The Pirates of Dark Water. It was still plagued by many of the ills of the previous decade's "story" cartoons, like the inevitable bumbling, annoying "comic relief" character, but it at least had an overarching story and made progress along its arc.

Predictably, it didn't last long. Fortunately, others were in the works--Batman: The Animated Series came along soon after, and Gargoyles a couple of years later. These were cartoons where people were allowed to die, and (perhaps more significantly) to change. They had real stories. They had classical references (especially Gargoyles). The early 90s broke us out of the cartoon doldrums and opened the medium up for the proliferation of cartoon styles that followed.
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Old 11-17-2018, 05:55 AM
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On one hand, most of their later stuff was cheap crank-em-out crap.

On the other hand, without them we would never have had Space Ghost Coast to Coast.

Brak! Go to your room!

But Im not animated to do that!
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Old 11-17-2018, 09:19 AM
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Unlike Jay Ward, they didn't use the limits of their budget as a chance to write creative scripts. Instead they stuck to repetitive jokes and plots.
Im still not going to say a word against Hong Kong Phooey.
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Old 11-17-2018, 09:44 AM
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This, and it continued in the 80s, although the forces that turned two decades into a cartoon wasteland were not limited to budget and speed. Moralists trying to "sanitize" cartoons and the half-hour toy commercials played their part. I was a child of the 70s and 80s, but I was exposed to better quality cartoons first--classic Looney Tunes, the good Tom & Jerry cartoons, even Rocky and Bullwinkle. Consequently, even as a kid, I was aware that the quality of cartoons had taken a dive in terms of animation, humor, and storytelling. Cartoons were cripplingly infantilized. They were almost universally some combination of saccharine, badly animated, and obnoxiously repetitive (not to mention often direly stupid). I mostly watched and rewatched old cartoons and ignored the new ones.

The 90s saw a cartoon renaissance. Animation started to improve, and cartoons were allowed to have serious themes and actual stories again. And, although I dislike most of Hanna-Barbera's productions, I have to give credit where it's due: I think one of the first attempts to get the revolution rolling was an H-B production, The Pirates of Dark Water. It was still plagued by many of the ills of the previous decade's "story" cartoons, like the inevitable bumbling, annoying "comic relief" character, but it at least had an overarching story and made progress along its arc.

Predictably, it didn't last long. Fortunately, others were in the works--Batman: The Animated Series came along soon after, and Gargoyles a couple of years later. These were cartoons where people were allowed to die, and (perhaps more significantly) to change. They had real stories. They had classical references (especially Gargoyles). The early 90s broke us out of the cartoon doldrums and opened the medium up for the proliferation of cartoon styles that followed.
Didn't Adventures of the Gummi Bears, Ducktales and New Adventures of Mighty Mouse start an animation renaissance?
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Old 11-17-2018, 09:55 AM
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Didn't Adventures of the Gummi Bears, Ducktales and New Adventures of Mighty Mouse start an animation renaissance?
John Kricfalusi was one who put the art back into animation with the highly expressive Ren & Stimpy. Too bad MTV ran it on Nickelodeon in some markets who tried to water it down and forced John K out.
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Old 11-17-2018, 11:11 AM
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Didn't Adventures of the Gummi Bears, Ducktales and New Adventures of Mighty Mouse start an animation renaissance?
I will acknowledge DuckTales as a breath of fresh air in the late 80s--it had quality animation and genuine humor. I regard it more as a return to form than as the beginning of the change, however. It was what cartoons should have been in those two decades, not what they were about to become. It was fluff--good fluff, and I'm not denigrating fluff in general, as it certainly has its rightful place in the medium--but it was firmly within Disney's wheelhouse in a way that Gargoyles, seven years later, was decidedly not.

The cartoons of the 90s began to tell stories that were not "safe". They allowed characters to change and grow. They experimented with forms of humor, storytelling, and art that were previously regarded as out-of-bounds for their audience. They branched out, exploring the range of the medium--this was the decade that brought us both the grim noir stylings of Batman:TAS and the surreal absurdities of Courage the Cowardly Dog. The industry didn't just return to making good cartoons; they began making entirely new kinds of cartoons.
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Old 11-17-2018, 01:11 PM
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The cartoons of the 90s began to tell stories that were not "safe". They allowed characters to change and grow. They experimented with forms of humor, storytelling, and art that were previously regarded as out-of-bounds for their audience. They branched out, exploring the range of the medium--this was the decade that brought us both the grim noir stylings of Batman:TAS and the surreal absurdities of Courage the Cowardly Dog. The industry didn't just return to making good cartoons; they began making entirely new kinds of cartoons.
While true, they were highly influenced by Jay Ward, whose Rocky and Bullwinkle were doing that sort of sophisticated humor in the 60s. I'm sure most of those 90s creators would cite Jay Ward as an influence.

Thing is, HB mass produced cartoons. A few of them were adequate to good. But they also did a ton of crap that no one remembers.
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Old 11-17-2018, 01:16 PM
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I'm surprised no one's mentioned "Top Cat," another HB attempt at prime time success which ran on ABC in the 1961-62 season. It was all about a gang of alley cats who were always trying get-rich-quick schemes to improve their lot in life, but under the watchful eye of the local beat cop, who was wise to their tricks. It took place in New York City, and in its own way was a sort-of cross between Damon Runyan and Sergeant Bilko. It had some great voice actors too. Unfortunately "TC" only lasted one season, and except for a time of Saturday morning re-runs on NBC, pretty much disappeared.

Huckleberry, Quick Draw and Yogi...those were classics. They were syndicated and ran on whatever local TV stations wanted to buy them. In fact, I remember watching them on the very same TV station that employs me today, nearly 60 years later.
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Old 11-17-2018, 02:06 PM
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Why hasn't WB done more with the Hanna-Barbera characters?
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Old 11-17-2018, 02:22 PM
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They put out Future Quest and Future Quest Presents. Which were pretty good. They've tried modernizing several of the HB characters. Scooby Apocalypse seems popular. So far nearly all the rest have sank after a couple of issues.
I really enjoyed the Dastardly and Muttley mini-series. Too bad they'll probably never bring it back.
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Old 11-17-2018, 02:30 PM
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They put out Future Quest and Future Quest Presents. Which were pretty good. They've tried modernizing several of the HB characters. Scooby Apocalypse seems popular. So far nearly all the rest have sank after a couple of issues.
I really enjoyed the Dastardly and Muttley mini-series. Too bad they'll probably never bring it back.
I'm talking about rebooting old HB shows.
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Old 11-17-2018, 03:09 PM
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Filmation deserves praise for the animated Star Trek. Yes, the animation itself was cheap-o, but the writing and the voice talent were excellent. Fans consider it the last two years of Kirk's five-year mission.
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Old 11-17-2018, 03:16 PM
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I loved both Top Cat and The Jetsons when I was a kid. I don't know if it wasn't better for them to end when they did, though, rather than get old and stale. The same goes for Jonny Quest, another great favorite. The best shows always seem to go out when they know they're on top.
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Old 11-17-2018, 03:51 PM
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While true, they were highly influenced by Jay Ward, whose Rocky and Bullwinkle were doing that sort of sophisticated humor in the 60s. I'm sure most of those 90s creators would cite Jay Ward as an influence.
Certainly Ward influenced the humor, and that humor is one reason I mentioned Rocky and Bullwinkle in my earlier post. The changes went well beyond humor, though, and in many different directions.

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Thing is, HB mass produced cartoons. A few of them were adequate to good. But they also did a ton of crap that no one remembers.
Yes, Sturgeon's Law applies, beyond a doubt.
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Old 11-17-2018, 04:27 PM
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what people forget is hanna barbera was sold at least 3 times before ted turner bought them and the various owners changed the formula of the shows


that's why all the slapstick humor of the 50s and 60s changed in the 70s ……. because af some point jayne barbera took over and she didn't like "violent" cartoons …… so that's how and why we received yogis ark and all the crud after ….until turner and then warners bought hb and the cartoon network
although

they did have success with syndicated specials like "yogis first xmas, "top cat goes to Hollywood " and others

turners reign was hit and miss.....anyone remember "two stupid dogs" and tom and jerry kids? well the tom and jerry part anyways …. the droopy shorts got their own show eventually ….. the johnny quest remake would of been good except it got bogged down in an cheesy vr concept ….

actually you know what saved Saturday animation in the 80s? the smurfs … when they first came on they had higher ratings several nbc shows other wise theyed of had the same schedule on Saturdays they have now …..a weekend today show sports and local syndicated fluff …….

Last edited by nightshadea; 11-17-2018 at 04:28 PM.
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Old 11-17-2018, 04:32 PM
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but jay ward wasn't making cartoons for kids the flinstones and jetsons was hbs last attempt at at adult fare for decades

and even they made the flintstones kid friendly eventually
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Old 11-17-2018, 04:39 PM
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I recall watching the Hanna Barbera cartoons when they first came out -- by the way, nobody mentioned their FIRST show, pre-=Huckleberry Hound. It was Ruff and Ready:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9jN6j8NC7w

Even as a kid I could see they were cheaply made and not terrifically funny. We watched them because they were on. They made me wonder for several years why their cartoon animals had collars and cuffs. It was so that they could recycle body and head motions and not have the joint between them being obvious.

well, they were a step above those also motionless Cambria productions Space Angel and Clutch Cargo, with that damned Synchro-Vox. I'll give them points for the adventure show JOhnny Quest, which was cool, and they get an Attaboy for trying to branch out with Wait 'til your Father Gets Home, but H-B was pretty predicatble, boring stuff for the most part "McDonald's of animation," indeed. No wonder the advertisers loved them.


Gimme Jay Ward's stuff. Or even Shull Bonsall (whose Capital Enterprises got control of the characters and made the later CRusader Rabbit episodes, but still with wonderful punning and wit.
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Old 11-17-2018, 05:42 PM
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I loved both Top Cat and The Jetsons when I was a kid. I don't know if it wasn't better for them to end when they did, though, rather than get old and stale.
I take it, then, that you didn't see the Jetsons revival in the mid-1980s, as well as the theatrical movie (with singer Tiffany as the voice of Judy)?

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John Kricfalusi was one who put the art back into animation with the highly expressive Ren & Stimpy. Too bad MTV ran it on Nickelodeon in some markets who tried to water it down and forced John K out.
Er, Ren & Stimpy ran on Nickelodeon nationwide; it was one of the "original three" Sunday morning cartoons (along with Doug and Rugrats), and ran until 1997, when it was replaced on Sundays by Hey Arnold!. But you're right about Nickelodeon watering it down. However, I don't think Nick "forced John K out" as "drove him to the point where he left the show."
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Old 11-17-2018, 05:52 PM
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Talk about recycling...

Am I remembering correctly that every episode of Scooby Doo was essentially the same? The crew goes somewhere/stumbles onto something that they shouldn't. Scary things ensue, with some friendly person/persons you were introduced to in the opening scenes inevitably being unmasked as the instigators of said scary happenings, and their plot to take over the world, or whatever, is upended.

If I am, I hated Scooby Doo for this reason. If I am not, never mind...
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Old 11-17-2018, 06:13 PM
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Scooby Doo drove me away from watching cartoons. It was horrible, and yet it was very successful, showing up lots and lots and lots.

The 70s were awful for cartoons, as mentioned. The late-80s and early-90s saw a return of decent cartoons, with the aforementioned Duck Tales, followed by Darkwing Duck and the brilliant Animaniacs. How such wonderful stuff ended up being swallowed up by the likes of Ed, Edd n Eddy, I will never know.

Last edited by DSYoungEsq; 11-17-2018 at 06:13 PM.
  #41  
Old 11-17-2018, 06:19 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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Originally Posted by That Don Guy View Post
I take it, then, that you didn't see the Jetsons revival in the mid-1980s, as well as the theatrical movie (with singer Tiffany as the voice of Judy)?


Er, Ren & Stimpy ran on Nickelodeon nationwide; it was one of the "original three" Sunday morning cartoons (along with Doug and Rugrats), and ran until 1997, when it was replaced on Sundays by Hey Arnold!. But you're right about Nickelodeon watering it down. However, I don't think Nick "forced John K out" as "drove him to the point where he left the show."
my memory may be faulty, but I thought it was on MTV in at least some markets. I'm probably mis-remembering. It probably should have been on MTV, though.
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Old 11-17-2018, 07:28 PM
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Talk about recycling...

Am I remembering correctly that every episode of Scooby Doo was essentially the same? The crew goes somewhere/stumbles onto something that they shouldn't. Scary things ensue, with some friendly person/persons you were introduced to in the opening scenes inevitably being unmasked as the instigators of said scary happenings, and their plot to take over the world, or whatever, is upended.

If I am, I hated Scooby Doo for this reason. If I am not, never mind...
No, that's mostly accurate. However, Scooby Doo did mix things up a few times. There was one episode where the "ghost" turned out to be a good guy who was trying to scare off some real estate scammers.

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Originally Posted by jz78817
my memory may be faulty, but I thought it was on MTV in at least some markets. I'm probably mis-remembering. It probably should have been on MTV, though.
Don't worry, your memory's fine. MTV and Nickelodeon are both owned by Viacom and because much of Ren & Stimpy's viewership overlapped with MTV's, MTV also ran the show.
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Old 11-17-2018, 07:36 PM
nightshadea nightshadea is offline
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in the early to late 00s cartoon network ran a series of movies that for the first 5 or 6 movies the monster was real even if there was a scam involved

like scooby doo on zombie island the one where they were looking for aliens in nm and the two that helped them were aliens sent t o stop what was going on …..and once those were popular the movie came out and then whats new scooby doo.... and it returned to original form more and less
  #44  
Old 11-17-2018, 07:58 PM
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Whatever your feelings about Scooby-Doo, it deserves credit for one thing: no matter what sort of creature they ran up against, it always, without exception, had a rational explanation. It was never ghosts, it was always some person trying to pull some sort of a scam. Later iterations of the show, including ones that were objectively better In other ways, eventually dropped that, but for all its cheap production values and formulaic plots, its worth noting that at heart, the show was originally all about rational skepticism.
  #45  
Old 11-17-2018, 08:00 PM
Two Many Cats Two Many Cats is online now
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I liked their cartoons growing up. Liked, not loved.

But I heard a story once. It seems a daycare center put up pictures on their walls of Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck and other Disney characters. Somehow, Disney found out, and sicced their lawyers on the daycare, making them take down the pictures. Hanna Barbera heard about it, and sent the daycare free wall pictures of the Flintstones and Scooby Doo and Snagglepuss.

I love that story. I always felt Hanna Barbera had class.
  #46  
Old 11-17-2018, 08:47 PM
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They've tried modernizing several of the HB characters. Scooby Apocalypse seems popular. So far nearly all the rest have sank after a couple of issues.
The only one that might have 'sank after a couple of issues' is Wacky Raceland. (Or the unsatisfying ending may have just been a matter of being ill-paced.)

The other finished series from the first wave, Flintstones and Future Quest, were always meant to be 12 issue series, and Future Quest spun off a second series after it ended.

Everything after the first wave has run exactly as many issues as they were solicited for (6 or 12).
  #47  
Old 11-17-2018, 08:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Two Many Cats View Post
I liked their cartoons growing up. Liked, not loved.

But I heard a story once. It seems a daycare center put up pictures on their walls of Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck and other Disney characters. Somehow, Disney found out, and sicced their lawyers on the daycare, making them take down the pictures. Hanna Barbera heard about it, and sent the daycare free wall pictures of the Flintstones and Scooby Doo and Snagglepuss.

I love that story. I always felt Hanna Barbera had class.
According to Snopes, that story is true.

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/da...center-murals/
  #48  
Old 11-17-2018, 11:02 PM
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I take it, then, that you didn't see the Jetsons revival in the mid-1980s, as well as the theatrical movie (with singer Tiffany as the voice of Judy)?
No, I was in grad school then and didn't have much time for cartoons. I remember being vaguely aware they were back on and that there was a movie, but I never saw them.

I recall fans being upset that Judy was being voiced by some pop star, but I had no idea who Tiffany was until she posed for Playboy. (I still have that issue. )
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  #49  
Old 11-18-2018, 12:05 AM
Derleth Derleth is online now
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Ah, Hanna-Barbera! Has Sturgeon's Law ever applied more to the output of a single company? Maybe some Poverty Row film studios, and that's what Hanna-Barbera was: Strictly Poverty Row, making lots of product, product in job lots, and probably never losing money on any of it. Never making a lot of money, either; certainly never making enough money to add some more cardboard to their characters, or to buy another joke book, or to draw a few dozen more original frames of animation.

We have them to thank for the Renaissance of American animation: By the 1990s, Hanna-Barbera was ripe for reaction, and boy did it get it in the end. They thought animation should be bland and interchangeable? We'll make it outrageous and unmistakable! They thought animation was strictly for kids? Suck on South Park and Beavis and Butt-Head! They thought animation should be cheap and conserve every resource? Say what you will about Ren & Stimpy, its lovingly-detailed gross-out gags were definitely not done with an eye to sparing the pencil. They thought animation couldn't have story, characterization, or intelligent humor? Batman: The Animated Series, Animaniacs, Daria, Mission Hill... why, it's almost like the form doesn't dictate quality after all!

Am I picking on Hanna-Barbera? At least two whole shows on Cartoon Network/Adult Swim picked on it as their entire basis: Space Ghost: Coast to Coast and Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law. Both of them did more worthwhile with those characters than Hanna-Barbera ever did, and that's not even talking about the weird Jonny Quest pseudo-spin-off that is the Venture Brothers.

Yes, we still remember their characters. They rode the fell engines of mass media homogenization as well as they could be rode, and as long. They got their characters onto as many surfaces as possible, and the best work anyone ever did with them was defacing them.
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  #50  
Old 11-18-2018, 12:11 AM
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