Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-10-2018, 01:42 PM
Jim B. Jim B. is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 1,907
Probation and Cooking Alcohol.

Can people on probation or parole use cooking alcohol, cooking Sherry, cooking Brandy and the like?

The reason why I ask is sometime back, while she was still on probation parole or whatever, I saw Martha Stewart use cooking Sherry on her show.

Immediately I thought "busted!". But then I thought for a moment is it legal?

Thank you in advance for your replies.

__________________
"Love takes no less than everything." (from "Love Is", a duet by Vanessa Williams and Brian McKnight)
  #2  
Old 12-10-2018, 01:48 PM
rat avatar's Avatar
rat avatar rat avatar is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Seattle, Wa
Posts: 5,329
Was "no drinking" one of the conditions of her specific probation?

Last edited by rat avatar; 12-10-2018 at 01:49 PM.
  #3  
Old 12-10-2018, 03:38 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
SDSAB
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: my Herkimer Battle Jitney
Posts: 80,453
Yes, it all depends on the order. The probation orders I've seen which prohibit the ownership or consumption of alcohol (and not all of them do) make no exceptions. Otherwise too many probationers would say, nudge nudge wink wink, "Oh, no, really, Your Honor - I just use it for cooking!"
  #4  
Old 12-10-2018, 04:26 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Under Oveur & over Unger
Posts: 11,758
IIRC the stuff bottled as "cooking" wine or sherry has a good bit of salt added to make it unpalatable, if not undrinkable. would that change things?
  #5  
Old 12-10-2018, 05:59 PM
SigMan SigMan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 854
Not if they distill it. (Can they do that?)
  #6  
Old 12-10-2018, 06:15 PM
Anny Middon Anny Middon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,008
Quote:
Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
IIRC the stuff bottled as "cooking" wine or sherry has a good bit of salt added to make it unpalatable, if not undrinkable. would that change things?
Salt water is an emetic. I've always assumed that they put enough salt in cooking wine to make it undrinkable, at least in the sense that you can't keep it down.
  #7  
Old 12-10-2018, 06:20 PM
Chronos's Avatar
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 80,841
No alcohol might make sense as a probation condition for, say, drunk driving. But it's tough to see the connection with insider trading.
  #8  
Old 12-10-2018, 06:26 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 11,771
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anny Middon View Post
Salt water is an emetic. I've always assumed that they put enough salt in cooking wine to make it undrinkable, at least in the sense that you can't keep it down.
The salt is a preservative, and from what my cursory Google search revealed, probably isn't enough to alter the taste that much. It takes a LOT of salt to make a person sick, so much that salt water is no longer recommended for people who have swallowed poison, because people, most of them small children, have died from hypernatremia because they didn't throw it up.
  #9  
Old 12-10-2018, 06:28 PM
Hilarity N. Suze Hilarity N. Suze is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Denver
Posts: 7,748
So at one point a family member was on Antabuse. This person was coming to dinner and I was planning to make my easiest meal, a pork roast. Very simple recipe, sear roast, add two cups of finely chopped onion and two cups of red wine. Later, when it's done, make gravy.

At the time there was an internet but I could not find the answer to the question of whether someone on Antabuse could handle a pork roast cooked in two cups of alcohol, given that it cooked a long time, that I fed it to my children who were pretty young at the time. I was so unsure that I cooked something else (about time I learned to cook something else, really).

I still don't know. This recently came up again. I made chili and was feeding it to someone who's on probation and who gets UAs every so often. I was like, should I make a separate chili for this guy? Should I at least tell him that before the chili cooked for an hour and a half I put in 3/4 of a cup of brown ale? Again, I was not hesitant to feed this to little children. I certainly wouldn't feed them anything alcoholic. But I don't know if it would (a) show up on a UA or (b) react with Antabuse.

I realize this is different that somebody on probation using booze to cook with. I can't see any reason that person couldn't cook with it unless they were prohibited from buying and/or possessing it. Ingesting it might be another thing, or would it?
  #10  
Old 12-10-2018, 06:34 PM
Anny Middon Anny Middon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,008
Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
The salt is a preservative, and from what my cursory Google search revealed, probably isn't enough to alter the taste that much. It takes a LOT of salt to make a person sick, so much that salt water is no longer recommended for people who have swallowed poison, because people, most of them small children, have died from hypernatremia because they didn't throw it up.
Ignorance fought. Thanks.
  #11  
Old 12-10-2018, 06:39 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 45,969
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anny Middon View Post
Ignorance fought. Thanks.
I've taken a swig of cooking wine. I can't imagine any human being, no matter how much they were jonesing for an alcoholic bite, could drink that in any amount that would give them a buzz. I see vanilla extract and mouthwash before I can see someone trying to down enough cooking wine to get them hammered.
  #12  
Old 12-10-2018, 06:40 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 11,771
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hilarity N. Suze View Post
So at one point a family member was on Antabuse. This person was coming to dinner and I was planning to make my easiest meal, a pork roast. Very simple recipe, sear roast, add two cups of finely chopped onion and two cups of red wine. Later, when it's done, make gravy.

At the time there was an internet but I could not find the answer to the question of whether someone on Antabuse could handle a pork roast cooked in two cups of alcohol, given that it cooked a long time, that I fed it to my children who were pretty young at the time. I was so unsure that I cooked something else (about time I learned to cook something else, really).

I still don't know. This recently came up again. I made chili and was feeding it to someone who's on probation and who gets UAs every so often. I was like, should I make a separate chili for this guy? Should I at least tell him that before the chili cooked for an hour and a half I put in 3/4 of a cup of brown ale? Again, I was not hesitant to feed this to little children. I certainly wouldn't feed them anything alcoholic. But I don't know if it would (a) show up on a UA or (b) react with Antabuse.

I realize this is different that somebody on probation using booze to cook with. I can't see any reason that person couldn't cook with it unless they were prohibited from buying and/or possessing it. Ingesting it might be another thing, or would it?
The chili wouldn't have been an issue; even if the alcohol hadn't cooked off, the amount he would have ingested would have been negligible, and metabolized almost immediately.

As for Antabuse, even the alcohol in a spoonful of an OTC cough syrup can make a person terribly sick, so that would have been a "when in doubt, leave it out" kind of thing, were you to make that recipe again.
  #13  
Old 12-10-2018, 06:50 PM
Hilarity N. Suze Hilarity N. Suze is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Denver
Posts: 7,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
...
As for Antabuse, even the alcohol in a spoonful of an OTC cough syrup can make a person terribly sick, so that would have been a "when in doubt, leave it out" kind of thing, were you to make that recipe again.
You can't leave out a third of the recipe (basically) without it being a different recipe. I would just make a whole different dish. But on the other hand isn't alcohol that has cooked for hours not really alcohol any more? That's what I don't know.
  #14  
Old 12-10-2018, 07:11 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 11,771
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
I've taken a swig of cooking wine. I can't imagine any human being, no matter how much they were jonesing for an alcoholic bite, could drink that in any amount that would give them a buzz. I see vanilla extract and mouthwash before I can see someone trying to down enough cooking wine to get them hammered.
Maybe this is what wineries do with the batches that go a bit off, but not far enough off to transform into vinegar?
  #15  
Old 12-10-2018, 07:16 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan's Avatar
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Slithering on the hull
Posts: 26,730
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
No alcohol might make sense as a probation condition for, say, drunk driving. But it's tough to see the connection with insider trading.
Consider that a lot of folks ask for mercy at sentencing time due to suffering from an addictive disease, which led them to impaired judgment/diminished capacity. So it's not at all unusual for probation/parole boards to make abstinence a condition of their release on probation. Or for sentencing judges to do the same.

Last edited by Qadgop the Mercotan; 12-10-2018 at 07:17 PM.
  #16  
Old 12-10-2018, 08:39 PM
Ann Hedonia's Avatar
Ann Hedonia Ann Hedonia is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
Yes, it all depends on the order. The probation orders I've seen which prohibit the ownership or consumption of alcohol (and not all of them do) make no exceptions. Otherwise too many probationers would say, nudge nudge wink wink, "Oh, no, really, Your Honor - I just use it for cooking!"
It would also depend on how the order was written. And she may not have violated it. Did she consume the alcohol, would taking a bite or two of chicken cooked in a little wine count? I doubt it. The court order may have prohibited her from keeping alcohol at home or purchasing alcohol but she didn’t do that. She’s not cooking in her home kitchen, she’s in a studio somewhere. She’s at work, she’s performing.

But it would all depend on how the order was phrased. If she pours some wine into a pan while she’s at work as part of her job.......she doesn’t own the alcohol and she’s not consuming it.
  #17  
Old 12-10-2018, 09:00 PM
TSBG TSBG is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 2,434
I'm sorry I don't have a more precise cite, but I read an article (probably in Cooks Illustrated) that alcohol does NOT fully cook off, even in stews. It's obviously not enough to get anyone even tipsy unless maybe you ate the entire pot of stew, but I don't know how sensitive Antabuse is.

I know that people in AA often don't eat foods cooked with alcohol even if they think it has "cooked off" because it's a potential first step onto a slippery slope.
  #18  
Old 12-10-2018, 09:53 PM
road_lobo road_lobo is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Behind you
Posts: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
Yes, it all depends on the order. The probation orders I've seen which prohibit the ownership or consumption of alcohol (and not all of them do) make no exceptions. Otherwise too many probationers would say, nudge nudge wink wink, "Oh, no, really, Your Honor - I just use it for cooking!"
Possession of hand sanitizer?
  #19  
Old 12-10-2018, 10:13 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
SDSAB
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: my Herkimer Battle Jitney
Posts: 80,453
Quote:
Originally Posted by road_lobo View Post
Possession of hand sanitizer?
Never seen that prohibited in a court order.
  #20  
Old 12-10-2018, 10:18 PM
Doug K. Doug K. is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Hutchinson, KS
Posts: 3,800
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSBG View Post
I'm sorry I don't have a more precise cite, but I read an article (probably in Cooks Illustrated) that alcohol does NOT fully cook off, even in stews. It's obviously not enough to get anyone even tipsy unless maybe you ate the entire pot of stew, but I don't know how sensitive Antabuse is.

I know that people in AA often don't eat foods cooked with alcohol even if they think it has "cooked off" because it's a potential first step onto a slippery slope.
You are correct. Unless you cook it bone dry there will always be some alcohol left.

Here's some cites:

https://www.eatthis.com/does-alcohol-cook-out/
https://www.oasas.ny.gov/admed/fyi/fyi-cooking.cfm
And a pdf from USDA:
https://www.nal.usda.gov/sites/defau...-Retention.pdf
concludes that 4-85% of the alcohol is retained after cooking.
  #21  
Old 12-10-2018, 11:17 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 11,771
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSBG View Post
I'm sorry I don't have a more precise cite, but I read an article (probably in Cooks Illustrated) that alcohol does NOT fully cook off, even in stews. It's obviously not enough to get anyone even tipsy unless maybe you ate the entire pot of stew, but I don't know how sensitive Antabuse is.
Antabuse (disulfiram) blocks the liver's ability to transform an alcohol metabolite, and this metabolite is extremely toxic and causes severe flushing, nausea, and vomiting that lasts for a few hours. It must be taken by the patient with their full cooperation (no sneaking it into a spouse's breakfast, that kind of thing) and obviously isn't used much because most alcoholics won't benefit from it, and the ones that are usually don't take it.
  #22  
Old 12-10-2018, 11:58 PM
Spoons Spoons is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Lethbridge, Alberta
Posts: 15,474
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
Never seen that prohibited in a court order.
To be honest, I've never heard ownership prohibited in a court order. Consumption of alcohol certainly is prohibited in pretty much all probation orders, as well as consuming drugs "except as prescribed by a licensed physician or dentist." In a few instances, I even recall the judge ordering the person not to attend at a place where alcohol is sold or served (bars, liquor stores, licensed restaurants, etc.).

But I don't recall ownership forbidden. Thinking about it, there are many household things containing alcohol that could run afoul of such an order: vanilla extract, mouthwash, cooking wine (labelled as such, and with a lot of salt), and so on. Even so-called non-alcoholic beer could contain up to 0.5% abv.

Of course, jurisdictions can and do differ in their approaches to the details. As long as the person in question understands that the no-ownership/no-consumption order applies to beer, wine, and spirits, then that's all that matters.
  #23  
Old 12-11-2018, 12:06 AM
needscoffee needscoffee is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 6,854
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
I've taken a swig of cooking wine. I can't imagine any human being, no matter how much they were jonesing for an alcoholic bite, could drink that in any amount that would give them a buzz. I see vanilla extract and mouthwash before I can see someone trying to down enough cooking wine to get them hammered.
Ditto. It's completely undrinkable. It may not seem like a lot of salt, but it REALLY is.
  #24  
Old 12-11-2018, 07:43 AM
kayaker's Avatar
kayaker kayaker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 30,467
How does anyone know what was in the bottle? If it was a problem with her parole/probation she could have had someone replace the cooking sherry in the bottle with colored water.
  #25  
Old 12-11-2018, 07:52 AM
bob++ bob++ is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Worcestershire UK
Posts: 6,328
I know that things are different in the US, but "cooking wine"? With added salt? Is 'cooking wine' more expensive than a cheap bottle of plonk from a supermarket?

When I use wine in a recipe it is vin ordinaire. I do have some "red wine flavour" which I bought for a dinner with a teetotal friend, but TBH it wasn't that great. As for salt, I want to control the amount in the food and have a tendency to glare at people who 'automatically' reach for the salt cellar.

<anecdote>
We used to be involved with the Girl Guides and sometimes helped with the catering on Brownie weekends away. For Sunday lunch we served roast meat etc and red or white grape juice as pretend wine. On one occasion we had an official complaint about serving wine to small children.

Last edited by bob++; 12-11-2018 at 07:56 AM.
  #26  
Old 12-11-2018, 08:10 AM
ftg's Avatar
ftg ftg is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Not the PNW :-(
Posts: 18,392
Given that you can easily get 40% of the alcohol still remaining in baked goods, the percentage remaining in stews/chilies/etc. has to be fairly decent.
  #27  
Old 12-11-2018, 08:49 AM
muldoonthief's Avatar
muldoonthief muldoonthief is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: North of Boston
Posts: 10,569
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob++ View Post
I know that things are different in the US, but "cooking wine"? With added salt? Is 'cooking wine' more expensive than a cheap bottle of plonk from a supermarket?

When I use wine in a recipe it is vin ordinaire. I do have some "red wine flavour" which I bought for a dinner with a teetotal friend, but TBH it wasn't that great. As for salt, I want to control the amount in the food and have a tendency to glare at people who 'automatically' reach for the salt cellar.

<anecdote>
Yes, cooking wine is something sold in supermarkets, which is far more expensive on a per volume basis than just buying a cheap bottle of wine. It's usually sold in smaller containers than wine (8 or 12 oz. vs 25 oz.), so the sticker price doesn't seem as bad however.

Note that in a lot of the USA, you can't buy wine in a supermarket, you have to make a special trip to a liquour store. So if you're just shopping for a recipe, it's a pain in the ass to make an extra stop just for wine, hence the creation of cooking wine.

Having said all that, I strongly doubt that Martha was actually using pre-salted cooking wine from a supermarket. She was probably using just wine, which is what every TV cook (and real cook) does.
  #28  
Old 12-11-2018, 08:51 AM
muldoonthief's Avatar
muldoonthief muldoonthief is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: North of Boston
Posts: 10,569
Quote:
Originally Posted by ftg View Post
Given that you can easily get 40% of the alcohol still remaining in baked goods, the percentage remaining in stews/chilies/etc. has to be fairly decent.
Your cite says that the 40% remaining alcohol applies to goods that are baked for 15 minutes. Goods baked for 2 1/2 hours only have 5% remaining alcohol. Stews & chili simmer for at least 2 hours IME, so they've probably closer to 5% than 40%
  #29  
Old 12-11-2018, 09:44 AM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Under Oveur & over Unger
Posts: 11,758
Quote:
Originally Posted by muldoonthief View Post
Yes, cooking wine is something sold in supermarkets, which is far more expensive on a per volume basis than just buying a cheap bottle of wine. It's usually sold in smaller containers than wine (8 or 12 oz. vs 25 oz.), so the sticker price doesn't seem as bad however.

Note that in a lot of the USA, you can't buy wine in a supermarket, you have to make a special trip to a liquour store. So if you're just shopping for a recipe, it's a pain in the ass to make an extra stop just for wine, hence the creation of cooking wine.

Having said all that, I strongly doubt that Martha was actually using pre-salted cooking wine from a supermarket. She was probably using just wine, which is what every TV cook (and real cook) does.
IIRC cooking wine/sherry also isn't subject to alcohol taxes nor is it controlled by state/regional "liquor control" boards.

not that you should use it, it's still junk.
  #30  
Old 12-11-2018, 09:59 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 45,969
Quote:
Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
IIRC cooking wine/sherry also isn't subject to alcohol taxes nor is it controlled by state/regional "liquor control" boards.

not that you should use it, it's still junk.
Yes it is absolutely repulsive. Our supermarket used to not have a liquor section, so, once--only once--I bought the "cooking wine" for a recipe, as I didn't feel like going to another store just to get wine. Never again. Thankfully, they have long since gotten the licensing to sell wine, beer, and spirits, so I can get sherry and port there, as well, without having to make a special trip.

The other thing is, at least around here, you don't get carded (asked for an ID to show proof of age) for cooking wine, so you can have one of your kids buy some while they're helping you run errands if you were so inclined to. But not that I would ever want to. Looking online, cooking wine contains as much as a teaspoon of salt per cup of liquid.

Last edited by pulykamell; 12-11-2018 at 10:00 AM.
  #31  
Old 12-11-2018, 10:40 AM
bob++ bob++ is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Worcestershire UK
Posts: 6,328
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
The other thing is, at least around here, you don't get carded (asked for an ID to show proof of age) for cooking wine, so you can have one of your kids buy some while they're helping you run errands if you were so inclined to. But not that I would ever want to. Looking online, cooking wine contains as much as a teaspoon of salt per cup of liquid.
Soy Sauce would probably be a better alternative.
  #32  
Old 12-11-2018, 01:44 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
SDSAB
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: my Herkimer Battle Jitney
Posts: 80,453
Blech. Never knew that about cooking wine. Thanks - ignorance fought!
  #33  
Old 12-12-2018, 01:31 AM
Gary T Gary T is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: KCMO
Posts: 11,314
Cooking wine is not considered an alcoholic beverage and does not have restrictions on its sale (age of purchaser, time of day, dry county, etc.) any more than the mouthwash or vanilla extract mentioned above. Similarly, it would not be of concern for probation or parole.
  #34  
Old 12-12-2018, 01:43 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: The snow is back.
Posts: 27,999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
Blech. Never knew that about cooking wine. Thanks - ignorance fought!
Count yourself lucky!

Disgustin' stuff.
  #35  
Old 12-12-2018, 03:36 AM
Nava Nava is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Hey! I'm located! WOOOOW!
Posts: 40,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob++ View Post
I know that things are different in the US, but "cooking wine"? With added salt? Is 'cooking wine' more expensive than a cheap bottle of plonk from a supermarket?

When I use wine in a recipe it is vin ordinaire.
First time I heard of such a thing as well. I mean, in Spain we do have the concept of "oh God that swill is barely good to cook with", but one reason my mother's stews used to be so good was that she used Dad's Christmas gifts from his job rather than the cheap stuff.

Piper, you have it in Canada too?
__________________
Evidence gathered through the use of science is easily dismissed through the use of idiocy. - Czarcasm.

Last edited by Nava; 12-12-2018 at 03:39 AM.
  #36  
Old 12-12-2018, 02:06 PM
Spoons Spoons is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Lethbridge, Alberta
Posts: 15,474
Not Piper, but I can attest that cooking wine exists in Canada too.

I see it as a convenience for those who, for whatever reason, never or rarely buy or consume alcohol. Remember, in most provinces of Canada, alcohol can only be purchased in liquor stores. There are some small exceptions (Quebec allows beer and wine in convenience stores and supermarkets, and I believe Ontario allows a small selection of beer and wine in a few supermarkets), but for the most part, if you want beverage alcohol in Canada, you go to a liquor store.

So, being able to buy cooking wine in a supermarket means that a non-drinker can still cook with wine. They can get it at the same time as they get groceries; they don't have to buy a full bottle, most of which won't be used in the recipe or subsequently consumed; or pay the cost (at my local liquor store, the cheapest bottle of plonk costs $10). A smaller bottle of cooking wine from the supermarket is more convenient and cheaper than a special trip to the liquor store for the real stuff.
  #37  
Old 12-12-2018, 03:27 PM
campp campp is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Arizona, USA
Posts: 3,058
I just came in to say that I miss-read the title as "Prohibition and Cooking Alcohol".

That might be interesting also.
  #38  
Old 12-12-2018, 04:04 PM
scudsucker scudsucker is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 256
FWIW, when making pastry, using vodka (or any white spirit) as 50% of the liquid (typically measured in teaspoons, so it's not a large amount)

The reason being that +/- 40 to 50% of the vodka (the alcohol content) will evaporate during baking, and the pastry will be much lighter in consequence.
  #39  
Old 12-12-2018, 06:40 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 30,587
Quote:
Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
IIRC the stuff bottled as "cooking" wine or sherry has a good bit of salt added to make it unpalatable, if not undrinkable. would that change things?
One thing it does change is that the supermarket will sell it to underage shoppers. And (at least in the supermarkets in California) they don't charge sales tax for cooking wine.

That's just an aside, and has no bearing on what restrictions paroled convicts face.
  #40  
Old 12-12-2018, 07:54 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Under Oveur & over Unger
Posts: 11,758
Quote:
Originally Posted by scudsucker View Post
FWIW, when making pastry, using vodka (or any white spirit) as 50% of the liquid (typically measured in teaspoons, so it's not a large amount)

The reason being that +/- 40 to 50% of the vodka (the alcohol content) will evaporate during baking, and the pastry will be much lighter in consequence.
I remember Alton Brown recommending vodka (or similar proof liquor) for pie crusts; his reasoning was that the 40% alcohol would reduce gluten formation (keeping the crust from being tough) while still being "wet" enough to make the dough workable.
  #41  
Old 12-12-2018, 08:11 PM
KMS94 KMS94 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by muldoonthief View Post
Your cite says that the 40% remaining alcohol applies to goods that are baked for 15 minutes. Goods baked for 2 1/2 hours only have 5% remaining alcohol. Stews & chili simmer for at least 2 hours IME, so they've probably closer to 5% than 40%
Rum balls aren't even baked. My dad used to plow the driveway of an elderly neighbor, and every Christmas time she would treat us with a batch. They would make my eyes water, holding the container in my lap on the ride home!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rum_ball
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:58 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017