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Old 12-14-2018, 12:04 PM
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Is this taking recycling just a little too far?

My wife and I have been separating our recyclables for years. Before the city started curbside recycling, we'd take it to the local Wal-Mart which had a recycling drop-off, and later we hired a local guy who would pick it up from the curb once a week. So we've always been a little more environmentally conscious than average.

However, my wife takes it much more seriously than I do. I will rinse out cans, plastic yogurt cups, etc and throw them in the recycling. In my opinion stuff doesn't need to be squeaky clean as long as you make some effort to get the food off. I don't even bother with things like peanut butter jars, margarine tubs, etc because they're just too hard to get clean, so in the trash they go. My wife, on the other hand, will throw them in the sink and wash them with all the other wash-by-hand dishes. Which is fine if she wants to do it, just don't expect me to follow suit.

Because of the recent news about the giant floating island of plastic and garbage out in the ocean, she is now refusing to use plastic straws when we eat out. She bought a set of metal reusable straws that she keeps in her purse and washes them out when she gets home. She hasn't started keeping forks and spoons from home in her purse to use instead of the plastic ones, but I figure it's only a matter of time.

But here is where I think she's starting to take it a little too far. The other night we took the grandkids to Chick-fil-A for dinner, and as we were leaving my wife started collecting the plastic salad containers and the kids' chocolate milk bottles so she could take them home and throw them in the recycling. "I don't want them winding up in the ocean!" she said. She's apparently been doing this for a while now when she takes the grandkids out for lunch, it's just the first time I had noticed it. And I guess it just seems a little extreme to me, but I don't know... What do you think?
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Old 12-14-2018, 12:12 PM
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I wash out everything that goes in my recycling, just like your wife does yours.

Where I grew up, we didn't throw a lot of food away in the trash: too many bugs and critters that could and would get into it. And where I lived in the late 1980s when municipal waste recycling began, it was made clear that all that food and whatnot on stuff would compromise and increase the costs of the program.

It's just a habit that I have now that I see no reason to break. And lots of times when I'm out I'll take my trash home so I can put it in the recycling rather than throw it in a nearby trash can.

ETA: TL;DR: No; I don't think what your wife is doing is extreme.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 12-14-2018 at 12:14 PM.
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Old 12-14-2018, 12:25 PM
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I would avoid telling her that a very large fraction of plastic pollution in the oceans may be making it there from the washing machine.
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Old 12-14-2018, 12:30 PM
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I'm sure she already checks pockets before running a load of wash. Or is it supposed to be coming from somewhere else?

Also, are you saying that your local fast food places don't have recycling bins?
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Old 12-14-2018, 12:44 PM
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Is washing recyclables at home actually better for the environment than washing them industrially at the recycling center?
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Old 12-14-2018, 12:47 PM
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I'm sure she already checks pockets before running a load of wash. Or is it supposed to be coming from somewhere else?
It is polyester microfibers being shed into the sewer from the cloth (of course, if you are on a septic system, it would be a different story).

Last edited by eschereal; 12-14-2018 at 12:47 PM.
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Old 12-14-2018, 01:21 PM
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But here is where I think she's starting to take it a little too far. The other night we took the grandkids to Chick-fil-A for dinner, and as we were leaving my wife started collecting the plastic salad containers and the kids' chocolate milk bottles so she could take them home and throw them in the recycling. "I don't want them winding up in the ocean!" she said.
#1: if milk bottles and solid containers in the regular trash would somehow end up in the ocean, then so would the regular trash they were mixed with. If that's the case, then she must be privy to a much larger problem the rest of us are totally unaware of.

#2: Assuming you really do live in "The Sunflower State" (i.e. Kansas - I had to look that up), then I wonder how your regular trash (or any plastics mixed in with it) might make its way to the ocean. Kansas has 50 landfills; Chick-Fil-A's trash is probably not leaving the state.

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Originally Posted by Yllaria
Also, are you saying that your local fast food places don't have recycling bins?
I think recycling bins in FF restaurants in the US is, at present, still a rare thing.

https://www.quora.com/Why-dont-McDon...recycling-bins
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Old 12-14-2018, 01:22 PM
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Plastic in the oceans is not coming from plastics thrown in a garbage can. If she throws her straws in a trash can, the likelihood of it ending up in the ocean is vanishingly small.

The vast majority of ocean plastics is coming from southeast Asia. According to this source China puts out about 32 times more plastic in the ocean than the US does. That is because the US (generally) properly handles our plastics.
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Old 12-14-2018, 01:26 PM
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It depends on where you live, but the chances of any trash I throw out ending up in the ocean are effectively zero. I'm about as far from either shore as you can get.
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Old 12-14-2018, 01:34 PM
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I think recycling bins in FF restaurants in the US is, at present, still a rare thing.
That's been my experience, as well. The only fast food chain here in the Midwest that I've seen with separate recycling bins next to the trash is Culver's.

That said, it looks like Yllaria, who asked the question, may be in California, and it wouldn't surprise me if California has laws requiring recycling by restaurants.
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Old 12-14-2018, 01:54 PM
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I say 'too far'.
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Old 12-14-2018, 02:53 PM
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The "garbage island is not a big pile of milk jugs floating out there. It's a bunch of very tiny to microscopic chunks, and they're not a big slurry but an extremely low-density patch over a large area. You could probably swim through it and not notice it, the issue is that it doesn't move away.

The reason to recycle is more about saving resources than worrying about where it will all end up. And while I recycle as much as possible, plastic is quite frankly not worth recycling that much.
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Old 12-14-2018, 03:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Machine Elf View Post
I think recycling bins in FF restaurants in the US is, at present, still a rare thing.
We have a FF chain in this area that uses materials formulated for composting, including plastic forks and sauce cups. Only a few items, like commercial condiment packs and one or two other things, do not go into the compostable-waste bins.
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Old 12-14-2018, 03:10 PM
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I must be a bad person - I don't wash my recyclables. I just throw them into the bin. I can't believe I'm the only person who does that.

According to what I've read, it gets washed after it's shredded anyway.

OTOH I brought my empty shampoo bottle home from the gym and tossed it in the recycle bin rather than in the trash at the gym. I also pick up Leet the Wonder DogTM's poops when we go for Nice Walks with the plastic bags I get from Wal-Mart and toss them in the trash, bag and all. Where, I assume, they go into a land fill. I suppose I should put the poop into the toilet, wash the bag, and recycle. Or maybe not - you can't recycle recycled plastic, and those bags might be recycled already.

It's not easy being green, as Kermit tells us.

Regards,
Shodan
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Old 12-14-2018, 04:33 PM
SpoilerVirgin SpoilerVirgin is offline
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I live in San Francisco, where all restaurants (all businesses of any kind), including the little takeout sandwich and salad places that I visit regularly, have separate bins for landfill, recycling and compost, along with signs indicating what goes where.

It's strange when I'm traveling outside of the city and I instinctively look for the bins to separate garbage. It now feels wrong to toss everything into one bin.

Shoeless - Has your wife thought about getting involved with any organizations promoting recycling in Kansas?
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Old 12-14-2018, 04:45 PM
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Actually recycling is low priority on the things you can do to help the environment. For example food waste. Why would anyone have more than a very small amount of food waste? Yet you see children routinely take more food than they will eat and leave a large amount of food waste on their plate. You ask the older generation and they were raised to eat everything on their plate. Or you see people carefully packaging up leftovers and putting them in the refrigerator--and later throwing much of those leftovers away after they get old.

Last edited by PastTense; 12-14-2018 at 04:46 PM.
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Old 12-14-2018, 04:56 PM
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But here is where I think she's starting to take it a little too far. The other night we took the grandkids to Chick-fil-A for dinner, and as we were leaving my wife started collecting the plastic salad containers and the kids' chocolate milk bottles so she could take them home and throw them in the recycling. "I don't want them winding up in the ocean!" she said. She's apparently been doing this for a while now when she takes the grandkids out for lunch, it's just the first time I had noticed it. And I guess it just seems a little extreme to me, but I don't know... What do you think?
Doesn't the restaurant have a compost bin? Obviously, the employees can do whatever they want with the trash - but I am assuming that when I throw food waste into the compost bin at a fast food restaurant, it gets composted.

After finishing the thread - Is this that rare off of the west coast? I expect compost, recycling, and trash bins in places.
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Old 12-14-2018, 06:27 PM
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After finishing the thread - Is this that rare off of the west coast? I expect compost, recycling, and trash bins in places.
Recycling bins at fast-food restaurants are pretty rare here in the Midwest, and I don't think that I've ever seen a compost bin at one.

I saw a separate compost bin in a food court when I was at the Atlanta airport earlier this week, and I think that was the first time I can remember seeing that.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 12-14-2018 at 06:28 PM.
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Old 12-14-2018, 06:30 PM
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Your wife is just out of place in Kansas & needs to move to California.

In our town (and many others in the Golden State), plastic straws, plastic bags, & plastic utensils have been outlawed. If you get take out food from a restaurant, you get no straw, bamboo utensils & paper containers (styrofoam is also not allowed). Dine in and you might get a metal or paper straw. And you must bring your own reusable bags to the grocery store to avoid harsh glares from other shoppers.

I know numerous people who bring their own containers to restaurants, either for take out food or leftovers. Your wife would fit in perfectly here.
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Old 12-14-2018, 06:50 PM
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I think recycling bins in FF restaurants in the US is, at present, still a rare thing.

https://www.quora.com/Why-dont-McDon...recycling-bins
I haven't clicked on the link (yet) but I do remember when McDonald's tried that, back in the 1980s, and it was a big waste of time, because for the most part, everything just ended up in the garbage anyway.

I reuse plastic, metal, and glass as much as possible, and if I can't, I do wash it first if I'm going to put it into my recycle bin.
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Old 12-14-2018, 06:56 PM
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I must be a bad person - I don't wash my recyclables. I just throw them into the bin. I can't believe I'm the only person who does that.

According to what I've read, it gets washed after it's shredded anyway.

OTOH I brought my empty shampoo bottle home from the gym and tossed it in the recycle bin rather than in the trash at the gym. I also pick up Leet the Wonder DogTM's poops when we go for Nice Walks with the plastic bags I get from Wal-Mart and toss them in the trash, bag and all. Where, I assume, they go into a land fill. I suppose I should put the poop into the toilet, wash the bag, and recycle. Or maybe not - you can't recycle recycled plastic, and those bags might be recycled already.

It's not easy being green, as Kermit tells us.

Regards,
Shodan
My cat's main litterbox is right next to the toilet, so I can just check it for solid waste while I'm using the potty myself, scoop it up, and flush it along with whatever I produced. Unlike most people, I subscribe to a dead-tree newspaper (see footnote) and that usually comes wrapped in a plastic sleeve; I save those, and take the majority of them to my local animal shelter, for the purpose Shodan described. I've put other plastic bags in there as well, and I also use the sleeves for cleanup when my cat decides that her dinner belongs on the floor or furniture.

Footnote: I used to recycle my newspapers along with the other items; I have a booth at a local antique mall, and they recently put up a request on Facebook for newspapers. I've taken them 2 paper grocery bags full of them so far; other recyclable paper goes into another bag.
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Old 12-14-2018, 07:00 PM
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Doesn't the restaurant have a compost bin? Obviously, the employees can do whatever they want with the trash - but I am assuming that when I throw food waste into the compost bin at a fast food restaurant, it gets composted.

After finishing the thread - Is this that rare off of the west coast? I expect compost, recycling, and trash bins in places.
The closest I've seen to compost bins at a restaurant is recycling oil into biofuel, and not many people do that. However, the restaurants are always happy to have someone who can haul off their used cooking oil, because they have to pay for that service (and that oil is often made into other products).

When I was in college in the early 1990s, I worked with a woman who had lived in Toronto for a while, and she said that a lot of restaurants there gave their food waste to farmers, who would then feed them to animals. I've heard of some independent restaurants doing that, although they didn't donate plate scrapings; it was things that didn't get served in the first place, like meat or vegetable trimmings.
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Old 12-14-2018, 07:54 PM
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Shoeless - Has your wife thought about getting involved with any organizations promoting recycling in Kansas?
That is an excellent idea. She's semi-retired these days, and might enjoy getting involved in something like that.
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Old 12-14-2018, 08:11 PM
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Very rural, here. I have a garbage can and a burn barrel. We don't have trash pickup here. I have to haul my own trash to a landfill. I burn what I can. I know it's not socially acceptable. The landfill is at least 30 min. away. Gotta do what I gotta do.
ETA I wash out cans and containers too. I don't think your wife has gone too far, in that. Maybe hauling trash home from a restaurant is over the top.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 12-14-2018 at 08:13 PM.
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Old 12-14-2018, 09:51 PM
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I must be a bad person - I don't wash my recyclables. I just throw them into the bin. I can't believe I'm the only person who does that.
You're better than me. We have no recycling here. Zero. When I tried taking glass and cans to a neighboring town I was told they would not take my recyclables. My garbage goes to work with me and I put it in my dumpster. Cardboard and paper goes to our burn barrel.
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Old 12-14-2018, 10:32 PM
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I must be a bad person - I don't wash my recyclables. I just throw them into the bin. I can't believe I'm the only person who does that.
You aren't. And it never even occurred to me to do such a thing. I would expect everything to be melted/shredded/whatever following some process that might or might
not includes washing for eliminating whatever garbage sticks to it. I definitely wouldn't expect that your meticulously cleaned garbage would not go through the same process as the rest, so even now that I'm considering it, I would assume washing the recyclables to be a complete waste of time.
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Old 12-14-2018, 11:06 PM
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My understanding is that a lot of plastics might not be accepted for recycling anyway. It depends entirely on who's processing the stuff (but any sort of food contamination usually gets stuff rejected ).

Might be more effective to spend the time and effort trying to persuade shop and restaurant chains not to use plastic in the first place, and energy companies to look at using waste anything as fuel for communal heating and power stations.
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Old 12-14-2018, 11:30 PM
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We have a FF chain in this area that uses materials formulated for composting, including plastic forks and sauce cups. Only a few items, like commercial condiment packs and one or two other things, do not go into the compostable-waste bins.
I'm curious: what is the chain?
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Old 12-15-2018, 03:08 AM
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I'd venture that the amount of (formerly) clean potable water that's now polluted + the energy use to heat the washing water together outweigh any environmental benefits to recycling the plastic items in the first place.

So to me, that's going too far: when your actions make things worse instead of better.
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Old 12-15-2018, 06:24 AM
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Is washing recyclables at home actually better for the environment than washing them industrially at the recycling center?
No; you're supposed to rinse out any chunky stuff but there's no point in washing them carefully, as they will get washed anyway. So, it's not even washing at home instead of at the recycling center, you're wasting soap and water.
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Old 12-15-2018, 10:00 AM
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I just throw them in the sink after I do the dishes, and put them on a towel to dry, don't think I'm wasting much.
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Old 12-15-2018, 10:06 AM
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#1: if milk bottles and solid containers in the regular trash would somehow end up in the ocean, then so would the regular trash they were mixed with. If that's the case, then she must be privy to a much larger problem the rest of us are totally unaware of.
The sources of plastic pollution in the ocean are also sources of "regular trash". The difference is that that regular trash is some combination of heavier than water and/or degrades quicker, so the problem is more local and doesn't accumulate in the same way.
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Old 12-15-2018, 10:59 AM
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That is an excellent idea. She's semi-retired these days, and might enjoy getting involved in something like that.
If your local schools use styrofoam trays in the lunchroom, moving to reusable trays would be a huge win. Requires a dishwasher at the school, though.
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Old 12-15-2018, 04:45 PM
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Cardboard lunch trays would also be a solution to the biodegradable issue, although they probably cost more than styrofoam.
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Old 12-16-2018, 07:18 AM
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.After finishing the thread - Is this that rare off of the west coast? I expect compost, recycling, and trash bins in places.
These bins are nonexistent in SE Louisiana, for what itís worth. Itís common for offices and other white-collar workplaces to recycle plastic and paper, though.

Reusable grocery bags are available these days, but rarely used. I might see someone use their own shopping bags at a grocery store maybe once or twice a year.
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Old 12-17-2018, 01:56 AM
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My understanding is that the problem with plastics isn't the ocean problem, but how it can affect the local environment. Plastic bags get blown away by the wind. Straws don't make it all the way to the trash can.

I do not get, however, why they aren't just using paper replacements everywhere, rather than inviting people to carry their own. Paper, if it does leak into the environment, will degrade quickly. Neither need to last all that long.

Oh, and I can't remember if I've ever even seen a proper recycle bin in real life. Definitely not in fast food places around here.

(Not saying no one recycles, or no one has their own bins. But I can't remember if I've ever seen those actual blue bins out in the wild.)

Last edited by BigT; 12-17-2018 at 01:58 AM.
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Old 12-17-2018, 02:11 AM
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Plastic bags get blown away by the wind.
Exactly. They get blown away by the wind and never end up in the landfills where they are a problem. They just freely roam the land like carefree pixirs and enjoy the nature they experience around them.

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Straws don't make it all the way to the trash can.
I also have never seen a straw in the trash. Piled up by the billions next to the trash, sure, but never in the trash or the landfills where they would be a problem.

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I do not get, however, why they aren't just using paper replacements everywhere,
Me neither, as obviously paper water and drink bottles are the way to go instead of those evil plastics.

Quote:
Oh, and I can't remember if I've ever even seen a proper recycle bin in real life.
I know I never have.

Quote:
But I can't remember if I've ever seen those actual blue bins out in the wild.
I know I never have. Especially not in front of peoples houses in neighborhoods in cities where recycling is mandatory.
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Old 12-17-2018, 10:28 AM
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(Not saying no one recycles, or no one has their own bins. But I can't remember if I've ever seen those actual blue bins out in the wild.)
Around here, the municipal recycling bins that every homeowner is assigned are green. Never used in restaurants or fast-food places, though.
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Old 12-17-2018, 11:04 AM
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You aren't. And it never even occurred to me to do such a thing. I would expect everything to be melted/shredded/whatever following some process that might or might
not includes washing for eliminating whatever garbage sticks to it. I definitely wouldn't expect that your meticulously cleaned garbage would not go through the same process as the rest, so even now that I'm considering it, I would assume washing the recyclables to be a complete waste of time.
I agree - it seems like a waste of water to me.

And I am so glad that a few posters mentioned that it's not us (USA) polluting the water with plastics and garbage. I've watched some documentaries (not about pollution) that showed in the background beaches in a few different Asian countries. There was so much garbage all over the that it was ridiculous. Plastic bottles and bags were everywhere. It's time for the other countries to step up to the plate. It's not the "Evil Americans".
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Old 12-17-2018, 11:25 AM
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Oh, and I can't remember if I've ever even seen a proper recycle bin in real life. Definitely not in fast food places around here.
Come visit Seattle. They're everywhere. Stadiums, fast food places, people's homes. If someone can't find one you'll see them walking around with the trash until they do. And compost bins too. Lots of stuff here is compostable.
  #41  
Old 12-17-2018, 11:46 AM
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Seems a bit over the top. But whatever floats your boat. Washing your recyclables first may be wasting water.

My Wife and I do pretty good and recycle all our aluminum, plastic and glass. We have a box for old magazines and such too.

I try to rinse out beer cans and bottles, but just cause it can get a bit stinky and it only takes a second and not even an ounce of water.
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Old 12-17-2018, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Beckdawrek View Post
Very rural, here. I have a garbage can and a burn barrel. We don't have trash pickup here. I have to haul my own trash to a landfill. I burn what I can. I know it's not socially acceptable. The landfill is at least 30 min. away. Gotta do what I gotta do.....
I used to be in that situation, got to say there was something satisfying about it, and amazing of how much reduction of volume there was. IIRC I maybe did one trip per year to get rid of the unburnable remains for the 'burnable' stuff.
  #43  
Old 12-17-2018, 12:35 PM
lingyi lingyi is offline
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Originally Posted by TRC4941 View Post
I agree - it seems like a waste of water to me.

And I am so glad that a few posters mentioned that it's not us (USA) polluting the water with plastics and garbage. I've watched some documentaries (not about pollution) that showed in the background beaches in a few different Asian countries. There was so much garbage all over the that it was ridiculous. Plastic bottles and bags were everywhere. It's time for the other countries to step up to the plate. It's not the "Evil Americans".
China just stopped accepting the import of trash from other countries and they (including the U.S.) are reeling from the effect as they try to figure out what to do with their trash, including some types of plastic. So in a roundabout way, they (including the US) contributed to the plastic in the ocean by overwhelming China's ability to handle their own trash.

https://money.cnn.com/2018/04/20/new...ent/index.html

Edit: If you have Amazon Prime, I highly recommend watching the psuedo-documentary (be some scenes are obviously stageed) Plastic China, to see where your good deed of recycling plastic ends up.

Note: I'm not saying don't recycle. I'm pointing out that it's not just "the other guys" that are contributing to the worldwide issue of what to do with plastic and other waste.

Last edited by lingyi; 12-17-2018 at 12:40 PM.
  #44  
Old 12-17-2018, 12:39 PM
DesertDog DesertDog is offline
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Originally Posted by Doug K. View Post
It depends on where you live, but the chances of any trash I throw out ending up in the ocean are effectively zero. I'm about as far from either shore as you can get.
I'm thinking Sunflower State means Kansas so, yeah.
  #45  
Old 12-17-2018, 12:58 PM
lingyi lingyi is offline
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Hawaii banned the use of non-reusable plastic bags in grocery and department stores over three years ago (small bags used in restaurants and convenience stores are okay), and this year banned all plastic bags in grocery and department store because they switched to heavier bags and claimed they were reusable (of course few people brought them back to the store since they were free). Now there's no plastic bags at all and you have pay $0.15 for a paper bag regardless of the size. Some stores like Longs (CVS in the mainland) don't have any bags at all. Either you have to bring your own, buy a reusable fabric bag or carry everything out by hand.

Individual residences have three trash bins with different pickup days. Dark gray is for regular trash, green is is for plastics, metal cans and paper, blue is for green waste (gardening trimmings and garden fruits and vegetables). You're supposed to rinse out all bottles and cans. I don't know how they would trace it back to the individual address, but you can be fined if you don't properly separate your trash and recyclables.

Restaurants and fast food places don't have separate bins because the labor cost of separating the recyclables from trash (trash can full, just toss it in the recycle bin) is too high.
  #46  
Old 12-17-2018, 05:51 PM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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Originally Posted by Shoeless View Post
Because of the recent news about the giant floating island of plastic and garbage out in the ocean, she is now refusing to use plastic straws when we eat out. She bought a set of metal reusable straws that she keeps in her purse and washes them out when she gets home. She hasn't started keeping forks and spoons from home in her purse to use instead of the plastic ones, but I figure it's only a matter of time.

But here is where I think she's starting to take it a little too far. The other night we took the grandkids to Chick-fil-A for dinner, and as we were leaving my wife started collecting the plastic salad containers and the kids' chocolate milk bottles so she could take them home and throw them in the recycling. "I don't want them winding up in the ocean!" she said. She's apparently been doing this for a while now when she takes the grandkids out for lunch, it's just the first time I had noticed it. And I guess it just seems a little extreme to me, but I don't know... What do you think?
The giant floating island of plastic isn't a floating island, and doesn't consist of straws and disposable plates from the USA.

It's a soup of degraded plastic fragments, coming down the Yangtze and Brahmaputra.(Assam) rivers and from poor coastal regions. The USA has good garbage collection and disposal systems, and your straws don't end up in the ocean.

When you buy new clothing, it comes labeled "wash before use". That's because the manufacturer doesn't wash the fabric. They don't wash the fabric because it turns the river blue (or whatever). You aren't subject to the same was disposal restrictions, so they want you to wash all the dye down your drain.

All the dye and the small nylon / polyester thread fragments and dust, which goes down your drain, into your treatment plant, into your river, and into the ocean.

That's your major contribution to ocean plastic, and the biggest contribution you can make is to wear and repair clothes, instead of buying new. Cotton is possibly not a solution, because it may be more energy intensive than artificial fabrics.

Anyway, the straws and disposable plates are a form of ritual purity. I'm not going to argue religion with your wife, and I don't know that you should either.

Last edited by Melbourne; 12-17-2018 at 05:55 PM.
  #47  
Old 12-17-2018, 06:32 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Originally Posted by Melbourne View Post
When you buy new clothing, it comes labeled "wash before use". That's because the manufacturer doesn't wash the fabric. They don't wash the fabric because it turns the river blue (or whatever). You aren't subject to the same was disposal restrictions, so they want you to wash all the dye down your drain.
I thought that washing clothing before wearing it was recommended to remove the sizing which helps clothing keep its shape in the store, and gives new clothes that very distinctive smell.

(Right now, I'm wearing a shirt I bought a couple weeks ago, and did not pre-wash it. It does indeed have "that smell.")
  #48  
Old 12-17-2018, 10:30 PM
Two Many Cats Two Many Cats is online now
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I get up at 4:30 am. Sometimes I don't get back home until 7 pm. I can barely keep up with the dishes and laundry. I sure as fuck am not washing my garbage and you can't make me.
  #49  
Old 12-19-2018, 11:00 PM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
I thought that washing clothing before wearing it was recommended to remove the sizing which helps clothing keep its shape in the store, and gives new clothes that very distinctive smell.

(Right now, I'm wearing a shirt I bought a couple weeks ago, and did not pre-wash it. It does indeed have "that smell.")
That too, but mostly in cotton or cotton-blend clothes. I get the "wash before wear" instruction on all kinds of fabrics.
  #50  
Old 12-19-2018, 11:19 PM
Ethilrist Ethilrist is offline
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The only composting here in the Twin Cities that I know of is a municipal site for yard waste, plus whatever people choose to do in their own back yards. When i was living in Berkeley, we had composting at the curb, alongside recycling and garbage. The garbage can was the smallest one, and usually only half-full while the others were overflowing.

Here in Saint Paul, just commingled recycling. I don't bother to rinse things out unless it's early in the cycle and I don't want it stinking up my kitchen for a week.
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