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Old 12-15-2018, 06:17 PM
Mangosteen Mangosteen is offline
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Got Your Flu Shot? 40% say, "No, Thanks."

http://www.fox5ny.com/news/over-40-p...u-vaccinations

I'm sorry, but I never get a flu shot. Not because I'm afraid it will give me the flu, but because I never get sick. I'm 65 and own a landscape company and have never missed a day of work since I bought the business 30 years ago. I'm working outside 5 days a week. I get up at 5 am everyday to work out. I don't eat junk.

Why do you (or don't you) get a flu shot?
  #2  
Old 12-15-2018, 06:23 PM
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I don't get one because I have a debilitating needle phobia--like, vomiting, spasming, fainting and concussing.

Flu Mist saves me, because the vaccine is really freakin' important, and you should get one for herd immunity if nothing else.

I really, really hope Flu Mist remains available.
  #3  
Old 12-15-2018, 06:23 PM
Velocity Velocity is offline
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I get the shot everytime. The $30 is worth it to offset what might be a week of misery and time out of work. Plus, the flu kills fifty thousand times more Americans annually than Ebola, or something like that.
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Old 12-15-2018, 06:25 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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I get the shot everytime. The $30 is worth it to offset what might be a week of misery and time out of work. Plus, the flu kills fifty thousand times more Americans annually than Ebola, or something like that.
My mom was one of the people who died after getting the flu in 2016. Needless to say, I get my flu shot.
  #5  
Old 12-15-2018, 06:29 PM
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I am required to get a flu vaccine every year. I probably wouldn't bother getting it if I weren't otherwise required by my employer.
  #6  
Old 12-15-2018, 06:39 PM
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I've had the flu. Getting the flu really sucks.

Getting a shot is fast and easy. It's also free (either through insurance or the city department of health). Why wouldn't I get it?
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Old 12-15-2018, 06:46 PM
suranyi suranyi is offline
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My dad got horribly sick from the flu a few years ago. Took him over a month to recover. I get a flu shot every year, like clockwork.
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  #8  
Old 12-15-2018, 07:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Mangosteen View Post
Why do you (or don't you) get a flu shot?
I'm allergic, so I don't get them. Hives are bad enough, but when it moves from wheezing to being unable to breathe... well, I'll take my chances with the flu, thanks.

Wish I could get them safely, though - with my asthma I'm at higher risk for complications like pneumonia than the average person. Also, getting the flu sucks.
  #9  
Old 12-15-2018, 07:26 PM
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They offer it free every year on campus, so sure. After catching the flu last year I'm never skipping it again. That was rough.
  #10  
Old 12-15-2018, 08:03 PM
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My sister died from the H1N1 flu in 2014. She was 50 years old and left behind six year old twin daughters. She didnít get a shot and she got it from someone who didnít get a shot and so on.

Other than people who, like Broomstick, have a valid medical reason not to get one, youíre a fucking idiot not to do so.
  #11  
Old 12-15-2018, 08:09 PM
Tempe Jeff Tempe Jeff is offline
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I'm a Foster Parent and, it is STRONGLY recommended to help protect the children in our care. Heck yes, I get one every year. I even get a $25 gift card for Fry's/Kroger for doing it through my workplace.
  #12  
Old 12-15-2018, 08:09 PM
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I've never gotten one before. I may decide to one of these days/years, but there's a fair amount of inertia I'd have to overcome. I'd have to figure out where, when, and how to get one, and take the trouble to get there and do so, and find out whether, with my current insurance, I'd have to pay for it. I do not like doctors, shots, or medical anything. And some years I hear how there's a limited supply of the vaccine, and I figure there must be other people who need it way more than I do. Even without the vaccine, chances are good I wouldn't get the flu, and if I got the vaccine, I could still get the flu.
  #13  
Old 12-15-2018, 08:28 PM
Velocity Velocity is offline
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Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
I've never gotten one before. I may decide to one of these days/years, but there's a fair amount of inertia I'd have to overcome. I'd have to figure out where, when, and how to get one, and take the trouble to get there and do so, and find out whether, with my current insurance, I'd have to pay for it. I do not like doctors, shots, or medical anything. And some years I hear how there's a limited supply of the vaccine, and I figure there must be other people who need it way more than I do. Even without the vaccine, chances are good I wouldn't get the flu, and if I got the vaccine, I could still get the flu.
Where to get it - piece of cake, virtually any major pharmacy such as Walgreens or CVS in autumn/winter. Just stroll in, ask, fill out a form, and wait ten minutes.

Cost - insurance will often cover automatically, and even if not, it's just $30 at most out of pocket.

As for illness odds, sure, some have gotten flu even while vaccinated, but their odds are drastically lower of such than those who haven't.
  #14  
Old 12-15-2018, 08:39 PM
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Where to get it - piece of cake, virtually any major pharmacy such as Walgreens or CVS in autumn/winter. Just stroll in, ask, fill out a form, and wait ten minutes.

Cost - insurance will often cover automatically, and even if not, it's just $30 at most out of pocket.

As for illness odds, sure, some have gotten flu even while vaccinated, but their odds are drastically lower of such than those who haven't.
Not to mention, my CVS gives you a discount coupon if you get one. When I go to pick up a prescription I have to tell them that no thanks for a shot, I've done mine already.
  #15  
Old 12-15-2018, 08:41 PM
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I'm allergic, so I don't get them. Hives are bad enough, but when it moves from wheezing to being unable to breathe... well, I'll take my chances with the flu, thanks.

Wish I could get them safely, though - with my asthma I'm at higher risk for complications like pneumonia than the average person. Also, getting the flu sucks.
And that's exactly the reason more people should get flu shots - it would decrease the risk for people who can't get flu shots for good reasons, not laziness.
Same with any vaccine - not getting it when you can increases the risk for those who have medical reasons not to be vaccinated.
  #16  
Old 12-15-2018, 08:44 PM
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I got mine, since I never have side effects, my clinic makes it real easy to get one, it is paid for by insurance, and I understand the benefits.

And also because my wife has written two recent books on vaccines, (PM me for details) so I'd better.

She also write a book on the flu which got paid for but not published when the expected flu epidemic a few years back fizzled out. So every silver lining has a cloud.
  #17  
Old 12-15-2018, 08:53 PM
Velocity Velocity is offline
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Seemingly all obstacles or reasons not to get a flu shot are absent. Cheap? Yes. Readily available? Usually, yes. Wait time? Short to nonexistent. Common and potentially deadly or debilitating disease? Yes.

It's not like you are being advised to spend $400 to wait three hours in line for a shot to guard against Marburg hemmorhagic fever. The flu shot can't make a more compelling case for itself than already has.
  #18  
Old 12-15-2018, 08:54 PM
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I wonder what it'd do to have reverse payments for vaccines: increase taxes, and use the surplus to pay for $100 bills passed out to folks when they receive their annual flu vaccine. Folks who don't get the vaccine miss out on the payment.

A similar principle could be applied to childhood vaccines.
  #19  
Old 12-15-2018, 09:16 PM
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I haven't missed a flu shot in over 20 years.

I never got them growing up, for some reason...not sure why. After entering the Navy after college, they pushed the flu shot hard during my initial training, so I got them for a couple of years, but I was a fairly hit or miss after that, especially since the Navy used to administer the vaccine with those jet injectors, which I never liked. (I was worried about what would happen if I or the operator flinched, and I was also worried about cross-contamination...which is ultimately why the U.S. military finally stopped using them in 1997.)

Regardless, what made me a believer in the vaccine was actually getting the flu twice in the mid to late '90s. I was teaching then, so I was exposed to a lot of people. Both times are indelibly marked in my mind as two of the worst illnesses I've ever had in my life. I laid in bed in a sick delirium, unable to move. I never, ever, want to be that sick again, so I always get the flu shot now.

I've gotten the flu only once since, and that was after getting the flu shot that year. It must have had some effect, because the illness was much milder. I was still miserable, but was able to sit up and watch TV.
  #20  
Old 12-15-2018, 09:22 PM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is online now
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Flu shots are mandatory for health care workers at the hospitals where I'm on staff. I'd get an annual flu shot anyway, as full-blown influenza* is a nasty illness which can kill, sometimes through secondary pneumonia.

Obligatory reminder to those who think their allegedly superior immune systems protect them: some groups especially hard-hit during past outbreaks (including healthy young people) have suffered due to over-active immune systems sparking damaging systemic reactions to flu infection (so-called cytokine storm).

*while it's well-known that flu vaccine is not one of the most effective vaccines out there (largely due to difficulty predicting which strains will be most active for a particular flu season and having to go into production with vaccines to hit those strains), it's less well known that even if you are vaccinated and get flu, the illness will likely be less severe than if you weren't immunized.

Fun side note: we will soon have another antivax Congressman in the grand tradition of Bill Posey - Mark Green (R) - Tennessee. He's also an ex-emergency room doc and should know better.

http://respectfulinsolence.com/2018/...s-to-congress/

Last edited by Jackmannii; 12-15-2018 at 09:22 PM.
  #21  
Old 12-15-2018, 09:31 PM
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I've been getting flu shots for several years now and consequently haven't had the flu since.
Also we've had a contractor working on our house since late October, but three weeks ago he came down with the flu. Yesterday he came by to apologize for his absence, and for not getting a flu shot. He looks like death warmed over and I don't think we'll be seeing him working until sometime in January.

Unless you wear a tin foil hat or have a valid reason, flu shots are a given.
  #22  
Old 12-15-2018, 09:40 PM
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I'm just not a high risk for it, and I don't get it for free like some workers. I am never around anyone who is at a high risk. The vaccine is indeed less effective, and doesn't have the same "eradicate the disease" motivation that the mandatory vaccines do.

If they do ever have a vaccine that could eliminate the flu, I would expect people to pressure for it to become mandatory. Then I would probably force myself to get one. If I become part of or am around high risk people, I would take one. But, as it is now, the benefits I see do not outweigh the hassle.

Especially given my past history with vaccines. Sure, I was a kid, and my body should be stronger now. But it's still frightening. I don't want seizures again.
  #23  
Old 12-15-2018, 09:42 PM
Nightfall1 Nightfall1 is offline
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I never got the shot. Got the flu at age 32. I finally knew why people said they were in so much pain they wish they were dead. I'm 65 now and have gotten the shot every year since. No flu since age 32.
  #24  
Old 12-15-2018, 09:44 PM
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I work at a hospital (non-clinical) and flu shots are a condition of employment. Hell yes I get a flu shot.
  #25  
Old 12-15-2018, 09:46 PM
Tamerlane Tamerlane is offline
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I've had the flu. Getting the flu really sucks.

Getting a shot is fast and easy. It's also free (either through insurance or the city department of health). Why wouldn't I get it?
Yep.

Now I'll note that last time I got the flu it was shortly after getting a shot. But that was the problem - I got the shot very late in the season and contracted the flu just a few days later, before I had time to properly develop antibodies. So I crapped out on that one.

Did that discourage me from getting future shots? Fuck no. Quite the contrary. As noted above the flu REALLY SUCKS. It was a week of massive misery, followed by another week of recovery before I was functioning at anything close to normal.

The flu shot is no panacea. But I get it for free and even if it were only 1% effective it would be well worth it to me.
  #26  
Old 12-15-2018, 10:07 PM
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The ACA mandates that all health insurance plans offer flu shots with no copay. It may be more convenient to pay $30 at a CVS or Walgreens, but if you're covered (and you should be) it's included with the premiums. Also, my experience is that doctors' offices will do it as a drop-in because A. It's so fast and B. It's so important. I know that YMWV.

Broomstick, have you got an albumen allergy? You may still be able to get flu shots:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-...y/faq-20057773

Last edited by TSBG; 12-15-2018 at 10:10 PM.
  #27  
Old 12-15-2018, 10:09 PM
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Also, some workplaces offer them for free--I wouldn't say it's usual (here in LA), but my wife does a lot of work for a company that brings in a nurse to give free flu shots. Enlightened self-interest.
  #28  
Old 12-15-2018, 10:24 PM
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Get mine every year. Unless you have a valid reason, such as an allergy, it would be stupid not to. Saying, "I've never had the flu," doesn't cut it as an excuse.
  #29  
Old 12-15-2018, 10:25 PM
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Yup, I’m immunocompromised, so it’s a necessity.
  #30  
Old 12-15-2018, 10:28 PM
Velocity Velocity is offline
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If I become part of or am around high risk people, I would take one. But, as it is now, the benefits I see do not outweigh the hassle.
How would you know who around you is high-risk? Do you interview every bystander in the vicinity?
  #31  
Old 12-15-2018, 10:59 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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I am never around anyone who is at a high risk.
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Originally Posted by Velocity View Post
How would you know who around you is high-risk? Do you interview every bystander in the vicinity?
Yeah, this is pretty much impossible. It would mean, BigT, that you were never around the elderly, pregnant women, babies and children, asthmatics, diabetics, people with heart disease, people with cancer, and people with auto-immune diseases. You don't have to hang out with them socially or at work - coughing near them in line at the store is enough to pass the flu along to them.
  #32  
Old 12-15-2018, 11:07 PM
pendgwen pendgwen is offline
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I'm an ER doctor. I get the flu shot every year and would even if it weren't required where I work. I'm around sick people all the time and I've seen up close how miserable real influenza is. Even to the extent of having young, previously healthy patients who died of flu. I make sure to get my shot early enough that I have time to develop antibodies before I start seeing a lot of flu patients.
  #33  
Old 12-15-2018, 11:09 PM
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Yes, I do. I wasn't always strict about it when I was younger. I've had pneumonia several times now (not from flu), and H1N1 made me incredibly ill. I get the shot every year, and make my family do it too.

(Ironically, my kids remember having H1N1 fondly. They remember it as the time they got to watch movies in bed and eat ice cream.)
  #34  
Old 12-15-2018, 11:20 PM
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Always get one; it's easy and free and convenient. I haven't had the flu in decades and it helps protect others
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Old 12-15-2018, 11:42 PM
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I keep meaning too, but didn't get around to it this year. A couple of places near me were offering shots, but they ran out of vaccine pretty quick. I could probably have got one at the doctor's office, but that means a lot of waiting. I plan to get it next year, but I'll have to get in earlier before they run out.
  #36  
Old 12-15-2018, 11:50 PM
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ZipperJJ ZipperJJ is offline
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I didn’t get the shot my first year of college, 1997. It was the first time I remember ever being told to get one (unless my mom had me get one at the pediatrician’s before then.) it was a stupid reason I didn’t get one - my stupid friend was like “my mom can get us one for free, she’s a nurse.” She didn’t.

I didn’t get the flu, but I did get a stomach bug and at the time I didn’t k now the difference. I was like “goddammit look what you did to me!” to my friend.

Anyway, I’ve gotten one every year since. The one year that it was scarce, 2009, was the year my niece was born. My mom and I stood in line for several hours to get one, to protect my SIL and niece.

I tend to feel a little poorly for a day or so after my shot. But I’ve read accounts of what the flu is like and I deal with it. Better than the flu. Better than passing the flu on.

My friend is a Type 1 diabetic and she doesn’t get one. It drives me insane. I honestly don’t know how her doctor or insurance let her get away with(out) it.
  #37  
Old 12-16-2018, 01:14 AM
kambuckta kambuckta is offline
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I had the 'flu (apparently) back in 1967 when I was 7 yrs old. Never since.

I'm 58 now and have no intentions of ever getting a 'flu shot unless I become immuno-compromised in my older age. I'm not afraid of needles/vaccines, I just get sick of the bloody hype when people with a sniffle moan that they have THE FLU.

I think I might have heard of maybe one of my acquaintances getting the real flu in the last 20 yrs. It's just not the threat to me that it is pumped up to be. I work from home (so no contact with workmates WHO PROBABLY AREN'T AT WORK IF THEY HAD THE REAL FLU anyway).

Last edited by kambuckta; 12-16-2018 at 01:18 AM. Reason: reasons
  #38  
Old 12-16-2018, 01:34 AM
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I had the 'flu (apparently) back in 1967 when I was 7 yrs old. Never since.

I'm 58 now and have no intentions of ever getting a 'flu shot unless I become immuno-compromised in my older age. I'm not afraid of needles/vaccines, I just get sick of the bloody hype when people with a sniffle moan that they have THE FLU.

I think I might have heard of maybe one of my acquaintances getting the real flu in the last 20 yrs. It's just not the threat to me that it is pumped up to be. I work from home (so no contact with workmates WHO PROBABLY AREN'T AT WORK IF THEY HAD THE REAL FLU anyway).
Iím embarrassed for you.
  #39  
Old 12-16-2018, 01:53 AM
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I have heard all the arguments why I should, and they seem reasonable on teh surface, especially as I am a huge advocate of all other vaccinations, immunisations, and herd immunity to protect children.

But:
  1. I don't trust the statistics of deaths from influenza each year. They are not telling the whole story, in that they are actually dying of other illnesses, of which the flu is only a single contributing factor. Exaggerated statistics to that degree automatically make me distrust them.
  2. I have never had the flu, ever, and though science tells me getting a jab will not cause me to start getting it, I don't want to risk it by rocking that boat.
  3. The odds of the strain being affected, of actually reducing the chances of the flu spreading, or even making a single damn bit of difference, are so slight compared to not getting the jab at all, I just don't see that there's any point.
  4. What people call the flu is usually not influenza, and they think it's more prevalent than it really is.

Sure, if you're susceptible, get a shot, but if you are not I really think it's better to stay out of its way.

Last edited by GuanoLad; 12-16-2018 at 01:55 AM.
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Old 12-16-2018, 02:27 AM
kambuckta kambuckta is offline
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Iím embarrassed for you.
Really? Go for it then, be fully ashamed for me.
  #41  
Old 12-16-2018, 04:47 AM
Tamerlane Tamerlane is offline
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I'm not afraid of needles/vaccines, I just get sick of the bloody hype when people with a sniffle moan that they have THE FLU.
I'm not really sure I get this. You're not getting a shot to somehow spite people who bitch about having the flu when they really just have a cold?

Quote:
I work from home (so no contact with workmates WHO PROBABLY AREN'T AT WORK IF THEY HAD THE REAL FLU anyway).
The problem one has with influenza is that it typically takes a couple of days to incubate during which time you'll mostly feel fine. It then usually hits suddenly and like a ton of bricks. Unfortunately people are infective while still asymptomatic.

When I left my house for work one sunny afternoon, I had zero symptoms. I stopped to pick up some food for me and my co-worker and while waiting for it to cook after ordering, started to feel very slightly queasy. Got to work ~30 minutes later and had lost all appetite - literally couldn't bring myself to eat a bite. ~45-60 minutes after that I had to lay down feeling seriously unwell. ~30 minutes after that I was feverish and experiencing severe alternating sweats/chills - I was barely able to drive myself home, where I proceeded to be a hermitic wreck for the next several days. If I had waited another hour to try and drive back, I probably couldn't have done it. Had to get a friend to leave me broth and meds on my front step, as I was literally incapable of getting out to fend for myself for a few days.

It's great that you work from home, but unless you are a complete shut-in you're just as likely to get infected from some poor asymptomatic bastard standing in line next to you at the market.

Last edited by Tamerlane; 12-16-2018 at 04:49 AM.
  #42  
Old 12-16-2018, 05:18 AM
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Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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The ACA mandates that all health insurance plans offer flu shots with no copay. It may be more convenient to pay $30 at a CVS or Walgreens, but if you're covered (and you should be) it's included with the premiums. Also, my experience is that doctors' offices will do it as a drop-in because A. It's so fast and B. It's so important. I know that YMWV.

Broomstick, have you got an albumen allergy? You may still be able to get flu shots:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-...y/faq-20057773
While I come up positive to eggs on a RAST test, meaning my immune system has IgE antibodies to egg proteins, I've never had a problem eating eggs.

The problem isn't an egg allergy - the problem is that I had a severe reaction to a flu shot. It's not theoretically a problem, it HAS been a problem.

Either my body can discern the difference between eating eggs and being injected with them, or it was something other than egg proteins that I've reacted to. Which is a possibility that folks seem reluctant to consider but might be an important one, as the formulations of such shots have changed over time.

I have tried to get one of "safe" flu shots but I have been unable to do so, and the insurance I had up until a year ago wouldn't cover them even if the doc could have gotten one. Either they plain just don't cover them, or they want extensive documentation there's a problem - but this happened forty years ago, the clinic where it happened no longer exists, and neither do the medical records. Paying out of pocket for extensive testing would have been prohibitive. Paying for the "safe" shot out of pocket would also have been prohibitive if, again, I could have obtained one.

Since I've had a reaction to the actual shot no one who gives the shot has shown any inclination to try another and see if the first reaction was just a fluke. One of the pharmacists where I work more or less said that while he has no trouble using an epi-pen in an emergency he'd rather avoid creating such emergencies in the first place.

Maybe if I could afford to see an allergist it could be determined for certain whether or not I'm allergic to the current shot and if one of the alternatives out there would be OK for me, but even now I just don't have the money for that - coverage for allergies under my insurance sort of sucks when it comes to seeing specialists.
  #43  
Old 12-16-2018, 05:25 AM
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Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigT View Post
I am never around anyone who is at a high risk.
I'm sure the literally thousands of people I come into face-to-face contact with at work have absolutely no idea that I'm an at-risk person. I look like a healthy woman somewhere between 45 and 55.

You can't tell by looking at someone. You probably DO come into contact with people who are high risk of problems from the flu because we're probably at least as common as people who are, say, left-handed. It's not just feeble old people in nursing homes, plenty of folks out in the community working for a living can't get a flu shot for whatever reason, or are still at high risk even if they do (folks who have had organ transplants, for example, remain at risk because their immune systems are compromised).
  #44  
Old 12-16-2018, 07:22 AM
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FairyChatMom FairyChatMom is online now
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My husband and I just got back from a 10-day cruise. We got our flu shots about a month before we left. I've started getting them annually anyway, but before being in a confined space with lots of strangers from all over the world, you bet I'm going to protect myself.

Not to mention the new grandbaby in the house. I've never had the flu, and I hope I never do.
  #45  
Old 12-16-2018, 07:38 AM
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Bullitt Bullitt is offline
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I’m like the OP but a little younger, 57, and I too don’t get sick. I used to never get the flu shot — I would say that being exposed to sick people was “good for my immune system, it makes it stronger”. But then I read The Great Influenza by John M. Barry, about the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, and that pandemic killed the people with strong immune systems! It explained how that pandemic got a strong person’s own immune system excited and over-activated, to kill its own host.

Since then I get it every year.
  #46  
Old 12-16-2018, 09:48 AM
monstro monstro is online now
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I got the flu once. It was the worst week and a half of my life. I have vowed to do whatever I can do to keep it from happening again.

Every year, my workplace brings in technicians who will give us the flu shot on site. Makes it very convenient.
  #47  
Old 12-16-2018, 10:25 AM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GuanoLad View Post
I have heard all the arguments why I should, and they seem reasonable on teh surface, especially as I am a huge advocate of all other vaccinations, immunisations, and herd immunity to protect children.

But:[LIST=a][*]I don't trust the statistics of deaths from influenza each year. They are not telling the whole story, in that they are actually dying of other illnesses, of which the flu is only a single contributing factor. Exaggerated statistics to that degree automatically make me distrust them.
It's impossible to know precisely how many flu deaths there are each year, but the estimates are not created to benefit The Flu Shot Industry.

"CDC does not know exactly how many people die from seasonal flu each year. There are several reasons for this. First, states are not required to report individual seasonal flu cases or deaths of people older than 18 years of age to CDC. Second, seasonal influenza is infrequently listed on death certificates of people who die from flu-related complications. Third, many seasonal flu-related deaths occur one or two weeks after a person’s initial infection, either because the person may develop a secondary bacterial co-infection (such as bacterial pneumonia) or because seasonal influenza can aggravate an existing chronic illness (such as congestive heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Also, most people who die from seasonal flu-related complications are not tested for flu, or they seek medical care later in their illness when seasonal influenza can no longer be detected from respiratory samples. Sensitive influenza tests are only likely to detect influenza if performed within a week after onset of illness. In addition, some commonly used tests to diagnose influenza in clinical settings are not highly sensitive and can provide false negative results (i.e. they misdiagnose flu illness as not being flu.) For these reasons, many flu-related deaths may not be recorded on death certificates. These are some of the reasons that CDC and other public health agencies in the United States and other countries use statistical models to estimate the annual number of seasonal flu-related deaths."

http://cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/us_...ted_deaths.htm
Quote:
Sure, if you're susceptible, get a shot, but if you are not I really think it's better to stay out of its way.
I marvel at the folks who are "not susceptible" or think they can tell when they're becoming immunocompromised (like kambuckta). Too bad it doesn't work that way.

Last edited by Jackmannii; 12-16-2018 at 10:25 AM.
  #48  
Old 12-16-2018, 10:39 AM
Athena Athena is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kambuckta View Post
I work from home (so no contact with workmates WHO PROBABLY AREN'T AT WORK IF THEY HAD THE REAL FLU anyway).
I work from home, too. That said, I don't see it as protecting myself; rather, I don't get out in crowds a lot, so if anything, I feel like my immune system isn't as good as when I was around people all the time. At least, I seem to get sick every single time I DO end up around big crowds - I can pretty much count on being sick the week after I travel for work, for example.

I always get a flu shot. I just don't see the downside; getting sick sucks. Getting a flu shot takes about 10 minutes. Even if it's not always super effective, the chances it'll keep me from the misery of even relatively benign flu is worth it to me.
  #49  
Old 12-16-2018, 10:54 AM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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But thing is you might still get the flu. Isnt it at best 30-40% effective and this year only about 10%. The yearly vaccine is only a best guess.
  #50  
Old 12-16-2018, 10:56 AM
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Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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My wife and I are 71, and I'm Type 2 diabetic. We get the high dose flu shot every year, and exercise other precautions such as carrying hand sanitizer in a coat pocket during flu season, avoiding touching common public surfaces and the like. Volunteer work puts you in contact with a lot of people, all of whom are possible sources of infection.
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