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Old 04-10-2019, 09:10 PM
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What effects of global warming have you personally noticed?


What effects of global warming have you personally noticed where you live?

From northern Belgium:

-Winter as a distinct season seems to be quickly disappearing here. We have always had a moderate climate thanks to the North Sea, but nowadays winter feels like either autumn or spring, with the occasional snow at +1C or rain at -1C. It's not just ordinary warming, I read on a weather forum that the wind directions in recent decades are increasingly coming from the south or the west, while for sustained winter weather we need humid cold from Scandinavia or dry cold from Eastern Europe.

-Mosquitoes are now active in december/january/february

-There are lizards everywhere now. These lizards are native to the Walloon river valleys where there is a warmer micro-climate and lots of rocky areas. In the northern half of the country, they were first spotted in Brussels in 2004 and since then they've spread all over Flanders. On a warm and sunny day I can see/hear dozens of them while riding my bicycle 3km to visit my parents. They're even active in "winter" (my mom's neighbor told her that her cat had already captured 2 of them in february). They need an average July temperature of at least 17C to breed, I guess we achieved that some time ago.

-Last summer I went into my parents garden to pick some grapes. I quickly noticed giant wasp-things (hornets) feasting on the grapes so I made a tactical withdrawal and sent my mom into the garden to collect the grapes for me (I have a phobia for bees/wasps/etc). Neither me nor my parents had never seen things before. My uncle, who has a large garden with fruit trees, had also never seen them before and showed off the corpse of one to family members. I hope these hornets are not going to become a yearly phenomenon, lizards are cute and I can deal with mosquitoes, but fuck those things.
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Old 04-10-2019, 10:50 PM
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I have not noticed any effects I could definitely attribute to ACC. I am writing though to suggest that effects, if present, are likely to show up in viticulture. Different wine grapes varieties do better at different levels of temperature. (This is a gross oversimplification, bear with me.) Temperature over a growing season is often expressed in the number of degree-days the vineyard has per year. http://wine.wsu.edu/extension/weathe...g-degree-days/ As growing seasons can be long, 220 plus days in some climates, each degree rise in temperature on average, if it occured every day, could shift a vineyard's suitable varieties that could best be grown there. See Winkler Index for more. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winkler_index

Anyway, that's where I'd expect to first see specific definite changes from climate change.

Last edited by Gray Ghost; 04-10-2019 at 10:51 PM.
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Old 04-10-2019, 11:46 PM
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Changes in the distribution of birds. When I was a kid in the 1960s Mockingbirds and Red-bellied Woodpeckers were nearly unknown in New York City, being mostly found farther south. Now they are very common.

A cloud forest area at about 3000 feet near Panama that I have been visiting since the 1970s has become noticeably drier, and several species of high altitude birds that used to be common there have disappeared or become rare.
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Old 04-11-2019, 03:44 AM
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When I bought my house 19 years ago, my daffodil plants came out of the ground in mid-March. Every year since, theyíve come up earlier. This yearís crop showed up around Thanksgiving 2018. Iím pretty sure this is due to global warming. Itís possible that the daffs will keep coming up earlier every year and eventually get back to where they started.

Azaleas here used to bloom in June. They are blooming now (early Ė mid April).

Since I moved here, there has been a huge loss of various birds, frogs, turtles, and bees. However, this is probably due to development and loss of habitat. It's sad and frightening.


* I live in a semi-rural lakeside community. The lake is suffering too.
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Old 04-11-2019, 06:52 AM
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Strawberries from the same regions are coming in earlier and earlier. OK, so that might be due to agricultural techniques…





I bought a house on the skirts of the Pyrenees in 2007. The town is tiny but, due to a glitch of history, happens to be the equivalent of an American county seat: it's got services and stores which would correspond to a town ten times its size. It's also less than half an hour from the region's capital, Pamplona, with its own stores and services.

A long-standing feud between City Hall and the Regional Government is that we happen to be the lowest village considered to be "over the snow line" (we get some road-clearing services we wouldn't get if we were considered to be "below the snows"); in fact, on the summer I bought my house I called my mother and said "you know how once or twice a year we've seen the weathermen put snowflakes in this particular town in July or August and thought it was some sort of in-joke? It's not! My car is wearing a snow beret right now and it's August 3rd!" For many years I'd see my neighbors coming from spending the morning at the public pool (bikini top, cutoff jeans, one kid hanging from each hand) and hear them worry that "it's so hot! We might break 30!" (85F rounding); meanwhile my mother and brothers, a mere 90km/55m south, were roasting in temperatures that surpassed 40 (105F, again rounding) in the day and might not go below normal body temp at night.

For the last three years we've broken 30. And 36. Repeatedly. You tell anybody in that village that global warming doesn't exist, you might come out having learned a few new words. In fact, anybody who's bought into the notion that "the Basque language doesn't have swearwords" is hereby cordially invited to tell any of my Basque-speaking neighbors that global warming does not exist: you'll learn how to cuss in Basque real quick.
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Old 04-11-2019, 07:04 AM
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In 1989 I hikes on Mt. Rainier and visited the Paradise Ice Caves -- long caves cut trough the Paradise Glacier by water runoff. I had to hike several miles from the trailhead because the glacier had melted so much that a lot of the caves were simply gone, but at least I got to see their beautiful blue interiors

https://www.pandotrip.com/top-10-ice...he-world-5023/

Now the caves are gone altogether.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradise_Ice_Caves

https://glacierchange.wordpress.com/...ce-caves-lost/


It's because of the global retreat of the glaciers due to global warming. Almost all the world's glaciers are in retreat, and have been for decades. To deny this, in the face of massive photographic and documentary evidence, seems absurd.


https://www.nationalgeographic.com/e...ming/big-thaw/

https://climate.nasa.gov/climate_res...-glacier-melt/

https://nsidc.org/cryosphere/glacier...s/climate.html
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Old 04-11-2019, 07:16 AM
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We have more frequent violent hurricanes, hotter summers, and more unstable weather patterns.

Wikipedia: "Officially, the decade with the most Category 5 hurricanes is 2000Ė2009, with eight Category 5 hurricanes having occurred: Isabel (2003), Ivan (2004), Emily (2005), Katrina (2005), Rita (2005), Wilma (2005), Dean (2007), and Felix (2007)." Keep in mind that this is somewhat dated and this decade is not complete.
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Old 04-11-2019, 08:28 AM
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We have more frequent violent hurricanes, hotter summers, and more unstable weather patterns.

Wikipedia: "Officially, the decade with the most Category 5 hurricanes is 2000Ė2009, with eight Category 5 hurricanes having occurred: Isabel (2003), Ivan (2004), Emily (2005), Katrina (2005), Rita (2005), Wilma (2005), Dean (2007), and Felix (2007)." Keep in mind that this is somewhat dated and this decade is not complete.
I believe in climate change, but I am skeptical of using small data points such as this. This decade is nearly over and there were only three.
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Old 04-11-2019, 08:35 AM
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Admittedly, I'm in Charleston, South Carolina so it's damn hot no matter what.

However,

Our downtown sees more flooding these days. The downtown and the Battery is pretty much RIGHT at sea level so a high tide or heavy rain can cause flooding sufficient to shut things down. But such events are increasing in frequency.

That and my roses. They now bloom year-round. Less in Dec/Jan but there's always something blooming.
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Old 04-11-2019, 09:04 AM
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We used to have snow in winter. 5-8 feet on the ground.

My parents told me that there was a winter back in the 1960s when very little snow fell and the grass was visible on Christmas eve. Normally, around the start of April, we've had 6 feet of snow on the ground. For the last 4-5 years, pretty much nothing. We do get snow falling, but the balance between melting and accumulation have tilted towards melting, so it doesn't stay. Stuff on the roads and pavements get compressed into ice, and rained on. The ice on the roads then gets worn away by spiked tyres, after which they gnaw up the tarmac, filling the air with a massive amounts of dust. The ice on the sidewalks stay for the winter, fed by the occasional snowfall and freeze. We've actually had a reasonable amount of snow this year, maybe 2-3 feet. first time in several years. I thought winters like that were gone. It is much less than last decade, but it is actually snow rather than ice and rain.

We have new insects and animals showing up. Ticks, ants, Raccon Dogs. Giant mutant radioactive arthropods. Although that last is the Soviets fault not the climate.

Evergreens like pine are showing up. It used to be, they would thrive if planted, but not quite manage to reproduce well. Areas that used to be treless and tundra-like now have trees growing. All of the trees in these areas look about the same age. The green line is going higher up on the mountains. The bare stone bits are smaller.

Glaciers are shrinking and retreating. Or vanishing. Areas that tended to keep snow cover through the summer don't any more. Archaeologists are swarming these days, picking over areas that were last exposed to light around 6000 BC and finding all sorts of stuff.

Summers are warmer, which is pleasant.

Avalanches seem to be more frequent, and may happen in places where they previously didn't which can be lethal.
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Old 04-11-2019, 09:04 AM
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I haven't seen it myself, but one of the more obvious manifestations is the flooding in Miami:

https://www.businessinsider.com/miam...lutions-2018-4

https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-...erwater-future



A similar thing that HAS affected me is the incredible reach of flooding during superstorm Sandy a few years back. It effectively wiped out my in-law's beachfront property down at Seaside Heights, NJ, but it also send unprecedented levels of flooding in my home town much farther north (and the neighboring town). Water had NEVER been recorded this far uphill, reaching well into the downtown region and devastating businesses that everyone would have thought safe. One bank had its vaults flooded and rusted into uselessness. A great many homes and businesses had to be torn down (including what had been my aunt and uncle's business, although they had moved from there many years before).

You could argue, I suppose, that this was a mere statistical anomaly, but if so, it's an incredibly outlier -- water levels rose MUCH higher than they had in the entire recorded history of the town, flooding things thought to be safely above any conceivable reach of the water (like those bank vaults).
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Old 04-11-2019, 09:10 AM
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I don't know if it's directly attributable to AGW, or even if my observations are backed up by actual data. BUT, it seems to me that, here in my part of the Midwestern US, the seasons are shifting later. That is, winter begins and ends later, as do spring, summer, and autumn.

Winters also seem considerably milder and more forgiving than the punishing ones of my youth. Similarly, summers seem longer and more brutal. Again, could just be faulty memory though.
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Old 04-11-2019, 09:35 AM
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Smoke. Every summer and fall: Smoke. I used to love backpacking season. You could get to the top of a mountain and see for miles through clear skies. Now you better go while there is still snow on the ground if you want to get those views.
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Old 04-11-2019, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by yellow sausage bandit View Post

-Last summer I went into my parents garden to pick some grapes. I quickly noticed giant wasp-things (hornets) feasting on the grapes so I made a tactical withdrawal and sent my mom into the garden to collect the grapes for me (I have a phobia for bees/wasps/etc). Neither me nor my parents had never seen things before. My uncle, who has a large garden with fruit trees, had also never seen them before and showed off the corpse of one to family members. I hope these hornets are not going to become a yearly phenomenon, lizards are cute and I can deal with mosquitoes, but fuck those things.
It wasn't one of these was it? Asian hornet? If so, that's not a global warming thing, as it happens, it's an accidental introduction to Europe from China, that's just got no effective natural predators.

Round here, I've certainly noticed an increase in weather unpredictability; crazy warm spells in February, then snow (which often means things start getting active for spring then get blasted by the cold). Plants flower out of season more, and we seem to get more extremes of weather, though our extremes are still a lot milder than most places, having over a month with not a drop of rain is not normal for such a wet climate, but we managed it last year. It's a big problem if you're not geared up for it, as well as the effects on nature.
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Old 04-11-2019, 10:40 AM
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We used to have snow in winter. 5-8 feet on the ground.

My parents told me that there was a winter back in the 1960s when very little snow fell and the grass was visible on Christmas eve. Normally, around the start of April, we've had 6 feet of snow on the ground. For the last 4-5 years, pretty much nothing. We do get snow falling, but the balance between melting and accumulation have tilted towards melting, so it doesn't stay. Stuff on the roads and pavements get compressed into ice, and rained on. The ice on the roads then gets worn away by spiked tyres, after which they gnaw up the tarmac, filling the air with a massive amounts of dust. The ice on the sidewalks stay for the winter, fed by the occasional snowfall and freeze. We've actually had a reasonable amount of snow this year, maybe 2-3 feet. first time in several years. I thought winters like that were gone. It is much less than last decade, but it is actually snow rather than ice and rain.

We have new insects and animals showing up. Ticks, ants, Raccon Dogs. Giant mutant radioactive arthropods. Although that last is the Soviets fault not the climate.

Evergreens like pine are showing up. It used to be, they would thrive if planted, but not quite manage to reproduce well. Areas that used to be treless and tundra-like now have trees growing. All of the trees in these areas look about the same age. The green line is going higher up on the mountains. The bare stone bits are smaller.

Glaciers are shrinking and retreating. Or vanishing. Areas that tended to keep snow cover through the summer don't any more. Archaeologists are swarming these days, picking over areas that were last exposed to light around 6000 BC and finding all sorts of stuff.

Summers are warmer, which is pleasant.

Avalanches seem to be more frequent, and may happen in places where they previously didn't which can be lethal.
This, but a bit further south, so it's not evergreens showing up, but evergreens claiming higher ground. Given more time they might be pushed out of lower elevations, but established evergreen forest takes more time to undergo succession than just a couple decades.
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Old 04-11-2019, 10:49 AM
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It wasn't one of these was it? Asian hornet? If so, that's not a global warming thing, as it happens, it's an accidental introduction to Europe from China, that's just got no effective natural predators.
The range of the European hornet, the largest one endemic to Europe, is expanding due to global warming. There were no confirmed observations between 1911 and 2007 in Norway, and now it is believed to have established itself permanently in multiple areas.

It's possible that is what yellow sausage bandit saw, and although I expect this hornet has been present in Belgium all along, it's plausible it's becoming more numerous. But I'm not an entomologist, and definitely not one well versed in Belgian hornet distribution.
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Old 04-11-2019, 10:57 AM
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I believe in the science, but I have not noticed anything different here in Ottawa: winters are cold, summers are hot, and we have rainy springs and cool autumns. It snowed again two days ago. It's easy to be skeptical when you don't see the effects. I do believe in the underlying science however.
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Old 04-11-2019, 11:24 AM
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I've noticed a change in the quantity and quality of snow on natural (non-snowmaking) trails at ski areas. What used to be normal conditions in MA, one typically now finds in VT and the northern New England ski areas which used to get mostly snow, now get more snow and rain. There used to be a ski area on long Island and in the Bronx, and one or two in Putnam County which used natural snow. While some skiing or sledding would happen here during the winter after a random storm, it's no where near enough to make a ski area viable like it once was.
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Old 04-11-2019, 11:40 AM
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Ticks. One used to be able to play outdoors basically care free. These days, vigilance and tick checks are necessary.
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Old 04-11-2019, 11:50 AM
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Ticks. One used to be able to play outdoors basically care free. These days, vigilance and tick checks are necessary.
More ticks over on this side of the states as well. It's gotten so bad that I Frontline myself when I do the dog.
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Old 04-11-2019, 11:56 AM
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High tides are getting closer and closer to my front door.

Another 6 to 12 inches and we'll have to build a dyke of some sort. Or move....
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Old 04-11-2019, 12:01 PM
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I've been watching glaciers recede and my swimmin' holes dry up for 20 years. The glacial retreat at the Columbia Icefields is marked out, year by year.
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Old 04-11-2019, 12:14 PM
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The range of the European hornet, the largest one endemic to Europe, is expanding due to global warming. There were no confirmed observations between 1911 and 2007 in Norway, and now it is believed to have established itself permanently in multiple areas.

It's possible that is what yellow sausage bandit saw, and although I expect this hornet has been present in Belgium all along, it's plausible it's becoming more numerous. But I'm not an entomologist, and definitely not one well versed in Belgian hornet distribution.
Yes, they were definitely European hornets. Red-brownish upper body, huge curvy lower body. They are native to Belgium but rare (my parents and uncle are around 70 years old and had never seen one). That said, while 2018 was a record-breaking year temperature wise (which is hardly unusual these days), it was also extremely dry (our ground water reserves still haven't recovered) which is unusual. It's possible they were forced to leave their regular habitats to find food/water due to the drought. So their appearance might simply be an anomaly aided by climate change, rather than a permanent habitat change.
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Old 04-11-2019, 12:33 PM
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Well, there was this drought recently...
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Old 04-11-2019, 01:21 PM
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If flying insect deaths are due to climate change rather than other possible causes (pesticides, for instance), then I have noticed that.

Firstly, I can drive up to my inlaws two hours out in the country with barely a single insect going splat on my windscreen. Twenty years ago, we were cleaning it constantly on long drives.

Same sort of thing when we went on holidays last year right around the other side of the world to Iceland. We were told before we visited that we should go see Lake Myvatn because it was gorgeous - but midges everywhere, bring your mosquito nets. That might have been true twenty years ago when my mother visited - hardly enough to notice, for us.
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Old 04-11-2019, 01:25 PM
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We were told before we visited that we should go see Lake Myvatn [...]
I missed the part where you wrote you were in Iceland and started looking up Lake Myvatn to see if it was an Australian pleonasm or just a coincidence.

Last edited by naita; 04-11-2019 at 01:25 PM.
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Old 04-11-2019, 01:30 PM
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We do steal place names from all over the world...
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Old 04-11-2019, 01:39 PM
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We used to have mild winters that were 6-10 weeks long. They're much shorter than that now, and contain more days of extreme cold. Periods of long heavy rain are more frequent than they once were.

I notice a lot of birds that I have never seen before.

We get a certain type of fine, warm, long-lasting rainshowers that I don't remember getting when I was a kid.
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Old 04-11-2019, 05:36 PM
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In the 1970s, I lived in Kansas City and performed with a group that gave an outdoor concert every year on Thanksgiving. It was always fucking freezing, and I remember dressing in many layers for the concert and desperately trying to figure out ways to keep warm.

Because of that, I always notice the weather in Kansas City on Thanksgiving. It just doesnít get that cold any more.
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Old 04-11-2019, 06:14 PM
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With one exception, I have spent 2-3 weeks in Barbados every winter. For the first 8-10 years my wife and I could take long walks down the beach (from north of Holetown at least as far as Sandy Lane, if you are familiar with the area). There was one spot that was hard to navigate at high tide. Now it is impossible; there just isn't enough beach. Also about half of the low tides are actually above "mean sea level", which is absurd.

In Montreal we see cardinals all winter, which is a new thing over the past 20 years. I think other birds are extending their season, but cardinals are really obvious. There is an insect (brown, lady bug shaped) that has appeared during the last ten years. It stinks when you kill it.
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Old 04-11-2019, 06:27 PM
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Texas summers are milder now, and have been so for 4-5 years now.......wonder if some polar vortex thing.
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Old 04-11-2019, 08:07 PM
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Texas summers are milder now, and have been so for 4-5 years now.......wonder if some polar vortex thing.
Agreed. Iím from the coastal area of south Texas. I remember when I was a kid in the 80s we often reached 100F. These days the low to mid 90s are more typical. Regarding the seasons, itís again hard to say I notice any specific pattern of change. A few years ago we had a bad drought (2016 IIRC), but since then the rains have returned, maybe a little above average the last couple of years. Luckily that rain has been spread out rather than having one or two major rain events with long dry spells in between. Weíve also had two winters with snow (2004 on Christmas and 2017 in mid-December) but before that there hadnít been any snow since before I was born in 1977. As far as ocean levels rising I canít say that Iíve noticed it. The beaches of Padre Island donít seem any different to me now than they were when I was a kid. If they have changed itís nothing dramatic like buildings having to be abandoned to the rising sea levels.
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Old 04-11-2019, 08:25 PM
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Agreed. Iím from the coastal area of south Texas. I remember when I was a kid in the 80s we often reached 100F. These days the low to mid 90s are more typical. Regarding the seasons, itís again hard to say I notice any specific pattern of change. A few years ago we had a bad drought (2016 IIRC), but since then the rains have returned, maybe a little above average the last couple of years. Luckily that rain has been spread out rather than having one or two major rain events with long dry spells in between. Weíve also had two winters with snow (2004 on Christmas and 2017 in mid-December) but before that there hadnít been any snow since before I was born in 1977. As far as ocean levels rising I canít say that Iíve noticed it. The beaches of Padre Island donít seem any different to me now than they were when I was a kid. If they have changed itís nothing dramatic like buildings having to be abandoned to the rising sea levels.
Year-round fire season in California.
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Old 04-12-2019, 11:36 AM
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Lots of rain and pooling/flooding in places I've never seen water build up before.

Seems to get dry and dusty really fast after a few days without rain though.
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Old 04-12-2019, 11:53 AM
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I live in North Central Thailand. I'm not competent to describe the usual flow of seasons but locals tell me things are happening at different times than usual. (Some of these timings involve interesting lore; e.g. the quest for the delicacy cone mushrooms ó our neighbors would even brave our dogs to pick such mushrooms from our old orchard at the picking time if they think we've overlooked them.) My sister-in-law even made a joke: Thailand is described as having three seasons, but "We've become like a developed Western country now ... we have four seasons!"

Increased heat is the most obvious change. December is the coldest month: we usually have a few weeks of cool, and some days where I'll want to wear socks and sleep with a double blanket. There were Zero such days this year.

April is the hottest month. I previously reported on the April three years ago. In March 2016 there were eleven consecutive days of 40į+ heat recorded at the nearest major weather station (484000). This was a record, but the record was immediately beaten: April 2016 had twenty-seven consecutive days of 40į+ heat recorded at the same weather station. There were 22 days of 42į+ heat that month (and an average daily high of 41.9į, demolishing the previous record (40.5į) for hottest month set April 1992.

The records from that weather station start in 1949 and show 19 days with 43į+ heat. Fifteen of the 19 were from April or May 2016.

2019 has seemed very hot, but the records at weather station 484000 show nothing special. However that station is an hour away from us with hills in between; where I live we had at least one 44įC day a few weeks ago.
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Old 04-12-2019, 12:12 PM
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More ticks and an extra cycle for fleas, so those aren't fun.

For me personally, I'm a winter sports guy, so the ski slopes are opening later and closing earlier. They almost never get all of the trails open and the snow is rarely powdery. As an ice fisherman, it's killing my seasons. It used to be Christmas until March, now we're lucky to get mid-January to mid-February. It's playing a lot more with dangerous ice as well due to freeze thaws and cavities. I don't care for it. At the same time, there is less salt on the roads and times when roads are impassable have largely gone away, so that's nice.
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Old 04-12-2019, 06:44 PM
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Severe flooding in my old neighbourhood, where we never had flooding before.

More snow in the winter. Completely unbearable heat in the summer, to the point where many in my area died from it.
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Old 04-13-2019, 04:14 AM
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Weather is becoming more and more unpredictable, also more extreme. Record heat, both in temps and duration, but also exceptional cold spells, due to Polar Vortex issues. Summer storms are more violent and more frequent, as evidenced by the downed tree messes I encounter on a regular basis these days.

Oak trees are sprouting up aplenty in places where there were no oak trees whatsoever 25 years ago. Subboreal is changing into Temperate.

Hunting, I see roe deer in places that had none before. Studies show roe deer are spreading throughout the country as the 2000's commence. Lack of snow depth is the main cause here.

Ticks are more numerous than before, with new subspecies, due to milder, wetter weather.

Some common bird species from my childhood have almost vanished from my surroundings. Studies tell that many of them have become endangered, even critically so, over the past couple of decades, although climate change is only one factor of many here.

The number and spectrum of insects in my garden, greenhouse and veranda has decreased dramatically from the past, although climate change is only one factor of many here.
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Old 04-13-2019, 10:32 AM
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new rivers are appearing daily (it seems like) on and in the Greenland ice sheet. We can see them in satellite images. Greenland is melting-fast. Most of the "global warming" effects will be relatively subtle and/or small. A couple of weeks less winter, a degree or so increase in average temp, etc. If the Greenland ice cap melts everyone in the world will be impacted. It is one of the 2 big chunks of ice in the world-the other being Antarctica-that are perched above current sea level. So all that water is going to raise sea level. A lot. Real fast.
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Old 04-13-2019, 12:18 PM
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Just some observations over the past decade or so:

Summer heat ( and humidity ) lingers on longer and longer, often well into fall. The arrival of September no longer gives you that "there's light at the end of the tunnel" sense that it used to bring.

While warmer days in winter here and there were not uncommon, now the spurts are warmer and longer. Lots of tree pollen in February. Tree pollen season used to be mid-late March through April. Now it's Feb-May.

Jet stream shift has been causing double the monthly rainfall totals for 8 months in a row now. In addition to the "normal" rain, every week or so a blob of precipitation on the radar the size of Europe moves slowly across the eastern US. The ground is completely saturated.
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Old 04-13-2019, 01:37 PM
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Mass Hysteria.
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Old 04-13-2019, 01:43 PM
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Well, in my state, Republican dominated legislatures have had to enact laws to prevent encroaching high tides from destroying real estate value. So, now the high tide and low tide lines are set by law, and cannot be changed by such trivial things as actual tides.

And you thought the Republicans weren't doing anything about climate change!

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Old 04-13-2019, 03:26 PM
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Just two unusually hot seasons. One might be an anomaly but the chances of both being so are much lower.

I was in New York State for a couple family events during the summer a decade or so ago and it was so hot that I couldn't do any of the hiking I had planned, it got into the 90s for several days straight and my sister's graduation was broiling as well: thankfully my brother's wedding was mostly at nighttime!

This year's winter was unusually hot here in Florida. There were only a few weekends that were clement enough for me to do a long-distance run without being hampered by the heat, and none which required me to have my shirt on throughout the run nor a hat except during warmup. Usually there are several weekends like this in a season, and several others where I can run comfortably without a shirt (which again, only happened a handful of times this season.) Sometimes there are even weekends where I need a long sleeve shirt or hat on throughout the run and that didn't happen at all.

And the weekdays were no colder this season either: usually there are 10 or so days where it is cold enough that it is more comfortable to wear a winter jacket or overcoat to work for the parking lot walk, and that didn't happen at all this year.
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Old 04-13-2019, 04:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatopescado View Post
Mass Hysteria.
Actually, in terms of actual effective action sufficient to deal with the size of the problem, mass apathy.
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Old 04-13-2019, 05:03 PM
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Since the OP asks for personal observations, this is necessarily subjective and unscientific, but there's what I think I've noticed. Frequent record-breaking high temperatures in spring, which seems to start earlier than normal, and fall, which goes on longer than normal. Not sure I've noticed that much change in hot summer temperatures although I understood we've broken records quite a few times in recent years. Periods of unusually heavy rains in summer, but actually less snow than ever in winter, to the point that I'm wondering if a plow service for the driveway is even worth it any more. More extreme weather -- we've have multiple periods in the past few years of winds strong enough to be destructive in an area accustomed to benign, boring weather.
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Old 04-20-2019, 10:45 PM
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I don't know if it's directly attributable to AGW, or even if my observations are backed up by actual data. BUT, it seems to me that, here in my part of the Midwestern US, the seasons are shifting later. That is, winter begins and ends later, as do spring, summer, and autumn.
...
Noticed that also. Also have seen a trend towards fewer *cat tracking snows. Most snow now is in storms.
The wooded swampy area we started hunting about 30 years ago was really wet the first few years. As in hip boots and waders to get some of the downed deer out. Then about 15 years ago, when my kids started, we were going through in knee boots and if you knew where to go you could get by in hiking boots. Now we are back to knee boots if you are careful and hip boots available in the cabin if needed. All this assumes the swamp and creeks haven't frozen over yet. Some years are, some aren't. Haven't been out in T-shirts and vests in years.

*cat tracking snows are dustings heavy enough for a cat to leave tracks in. One time about 35-40 years ago my dad kept note of over 85 snows one winter.
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Old 04-21-2019, 01:26 AM
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Over the course of 16 years in the Caribbean I noticed changes in coral coverage such as a sharp drop in staghorn coral outcroppings and bleaching events that are typically attributed to warmer surface waters.

On the other hand I lived on the shore of a Caribbean island all that time with no perceptible change in sea level or frequency of particularly high tides.
  #48  
Old 04-21-2019, 03:52 AM
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Hawaii used to have fairly predictable climate. Cold and rainy in December, pleasantly mild in March, hot days and warm nights in July, etc. Now, it's just...screwy. During the really bad part of the year, roughly late September to December, it can be uncomfortably humid one night and a freaking steam room the next. The early spring period is usually pretty good, unless a thunderstorm comes up, in which case it's almost freezing. Thankfully that's a rare occurrence, especially compared to the days where it's like a damn pressure cooker that pop up completely at random.

Oh, and there are never sustained heavy rains anymore. Anything longer than 30 minutes is a damn flash flood warning nowadays. A typical "rainy season" nowadays is one pretty heavy shower, four or five moderate showers, and four or five light showers, and the rest is the same dinky drippy-drip tinklers we get all the time the rest of the year.

Don't get me started on the hurricanes.
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Old 04-21-2019, 06:04 AM
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When I first moved here, the Australian summers were very predictably similar each year. A slow ramp up to hot, starting mid November to January, then a few months of very hot, then ramping down March to late April. It varied a little there were heatwaves or wet Januarys sometimes, but they were notable anomalies.

Now the summers are volatile in the variation. Inconsistent starts and ends, weeks where it will be 35įC one day, 12 the next, then right back to 35 again. Heatwaves are hotter, but shorter, and cold rainy days are more frequent. It's been this way for the last five years, and it seems like this is the new normal now.

I was just in Tasmania in the last week of March and had amazing weather almost every day, even though that used to be the start of chilly autumn by then.
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Old 04-21-2019, 07:08 AM
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South africa:

In my youth, one could rely on a windy early spring, followed by a solid week of light rain in early-mid spring.
It was so predictable there were local kite-flying festivals in august.

Since about 2005, these have become irregular, then vanished completely. Now it is cold dry winter, followed by mild *dry* spring, followed by earth-shattering midsummer thunderstorms.
Ok, we always had those thunderstorms, but previously they would dump their water on verdant grasslands fed by the spring rains. Now the same summer rain just washes mud around, and causes flooding.

In short, spring winds and rains have become unreliable or nonexistent, and autumn stays damp for longer before the onset on winter.
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