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Old 04-12-2019, 08:35 PM
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bands or musicians who used to be popular, then were mediocre or forgotten, then hit it big again


Meat Loaf had bat out of hell in the 70s, then his music wasn't too popular, then with bat out of hell II he became famous again.

Other bands or musicians like this? Maybe ones that used to be very successful and then either disappeared, or did music the public weren't interested in, then broke back into the mainstream years later?
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Old 04-12-2019, 08:48 PM
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Meat Loaf may be a decent example, but don't forget that Dead Ringer was a #1 album in the UK.

Several bands were re-invented in the 80s, including Heart and Cheap Trick, but I don't think that they meet your requirements. Boston took 10 years to release their (his) third album, but I don't think it's fair to say that the first two albums weren't appreciated in the interim.

So...I'm going to pick the Moodies. Seventh Sojourn was released in 1972 and they weren't (IMHO) big again until 1986.
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Old 04-12-2019, 08:55 PM
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OK, I have just been properly chastised by my wife. She reminded me that "The Voice" from Long Distance Voyager was very big in 1981. My defense is that it was generally considered to be a one-off from a band past its prime. I still maintain that the Moodies weren't "back" until 1986.
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:06 PM
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OK, I have just been properly chastised by my wife. She reminded me that "The Voice" from Long Distance Voyager was very big in 1981. My defense is that it was generally considered to be a one-off from a band past its prime. I still maintain that the Moodies weren't "back" until 1986.
I first got into the Moodies at the time of their 1983 album The Present. I kept paying attention after that, but I like 1981's Long Distance Voyager and 1983's The Present better than anything they did after that.


How about Roy Orbison, who hit it big again in the late 1980s, shortly before his death, with Mystery Girl and the Traveling Wilburys.
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:08 PM
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Yes were very successful in the early and mid seventies with over-sprawling prog rok, but the commercial success wound down til their massive comeback and biggest hit album 90125, with a very different sound.

That's one example. There are a lot more. Of course he never was gone, but Bob Dylan scored his first #1 album in the UK in 40 years with "Together Through Life" and his first #1 in the US in 31 years with "Modern Times".
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:15 PM
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Cher. Maybe the biggest resurgence ever from an American pop star?
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:46 PM
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The Bee Gees had a string of Top 20 hits in the U.S and U.K from 1967-1969 and then fell off the face of the earth. Robin went solo, then Barry and Maurice split up. They reformed, had a couple of hits, and then pretty much disappeared again by 1973. Finally in 1975, they turned to disco, Barry started singing in falsetto and they ended up selling 200 million records.
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:50 PM
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The Grateful Dead had a resurgence in popularity near the end of their run with Touch of Grey.
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:50 PM
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Aerosmith. Drug addiction and internal conflicts hit them and Joe Perry and Brad Whitford left for awhile. It wasn't until Perry and Whitford returned to the band in 1984 and they collaborated with Run-DMC on "Walk This Way" that Aerosmith became popular again.

Last edited by cochrane; 04-12-2019 at 09:51 PM.
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:53 PM
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How about Roy Orbison, who hit it big again in the late 1980s, shortly before his death, with Mystery Girl and the Traveling Wilburys.
A Baltimore band did a parody of "You Got It": Just when things got good, I bought it
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:54 PM
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The Beach Boy were considered has-beens by 1969. Brian Wilson's projects were delayed and he withdrew from the band. I went to see them about that time and they couldn't even draw 150 people to a free outdoor concert. They switched record labels in 1970 and then rebranded themselves as a nostalgia act and had a rebirth.

Mott the Hoople had success with their debut, but was on the verge of breaking up when David Bowie gave them "All the Young Dudes" and made them stars.

The Bee Gees were considered passe until they made a comeback with "Jive Talking." It was originally pitched to radio stations without telling them the artist so they would give it a chance.

Tony Bennett might fit: he was big in the 50s, but struggled to even find a record company in the 70s. He started recording again in 1986, and hit it big in the 90s, singing standards.
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:57 PM
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The Beach Boy were considered has-beens by 1969. Brian Wilson's projects were delayed and he withdrew from the band. I went to see them about that time and they couldn't even draw 150 people to a free outdoor concert. They switched record labels in 1970 and then rebranded themselves as a nostalgia act and had a rebirth.
Also, Brian Wilson finishing Smile in 2005 when he had been unable to in 1967.
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Old 04-12-2019, 10:01 PM
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Considering the title says "mediocre or forgotten", can we include bands that remained somewhat successful, but who's output went from acclaimed to mediocre and then back to acclaimed?

In other words, can my answer be Weezer? Even though their return to form was sadly short lived.
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Old 04-12-2019, 10:18 PM
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How about Roy Orbison, who hit it big again in the late 1980s, shortly before his death, with Mystery Girl and the Traveling Wilburys.
Roy would be my first nominee for this thread, as well. He had (I believe) ninteen top-40 hits in the US between 1960 and 1966, then only one song which even made the top 100 (#55, in 1980) between 1968 and 1986.

His re-recording of "Crying" with k.d. lang made #28 on the Adult Contemporary chart in '87; in '88 and '89, he hit #9 as a solo artist with "You Got It," and had two top 100 hits with the Traveling Wilburys, with two of those three songs charting after his death.

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Old 04-12-2019, 10:25 PM
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Kinda similar to Cher - Tina Turner, but with a smaller gap than Cher. Ike & Tina were over by 1976. She did not do well at the start on her own, but by 1983/84 she was a mega-star. I'd say she's one of the stars from the 80s that I would know as a star from the 80s, but my parents (Boomers) would consider her a star from the 60s.
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Old 04-12-2019, 10:37 PM
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Steely Dan had a great run in the 70's, didn't release anything for 20 years, then came back and won their only Grammy for an album that wasn't particularly good.
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Old 04-12-2019, 10:55 PM
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So...I'm going to pick the Moodies. Seventh Sojourn was released in 1972 and they weren't (IMHO) big again until 1986.
At least part of that was the direct result of the Moodies taking a three-year break from '74 to '77 -- though, the fact that the break came on the heels of a long world tour, and that it took them six months to record their first album after coming back together (Octave), meant that they effectively went for six years (1972-1978) without releasing new music.

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Old 04-12-2019, 10:59 PM
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How about Kiss? They were huge in the 70s, fell off in the 80s, then went huge again (at least as a touring band, if not records) in '96 when they returned to the original guys and the makeup. Even after letting Peter and Ace go again, they are still a pretty popular touring band as they wind through their final tour.

Blondie is arguably another. They were huge in the late 70s - early 80s then disappeared (due to Chris Stein's health issues) until reforming in '97 and having a top ten hit (in Europe) with "Maria" a couple years in. Not quite as huge as they were, but respectable.
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Old 04-12-2019, 11:27 PM
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Santana hadn't been doing so hot for some time, then released Supernatural.
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Old 04-13-2019, 01:41 AM
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Santana hadn't been doing so hot for some time, then released Supernatural.
I agree, that's another good example. While their peak was the early '70s, they were still consistently charting through the late '70s, into the very early '80s. But, then, for most of the '80s and '90s, they fell off the radar, until the huge success of Supernatural in 1999.

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Old 04-13-2019, 03:10 AM
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Tom Jones kind of disappeared for a while, and did a "hip irony" thing with Prince's "Kiss."
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Old 04-13-2019, 04:39 AM
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Sparks had a string of hit songs and albums in the mid-70's, were critically lauded, and were featured everywhere, from the Top of the Pops to Teeny Magazine covers. By the 80's they were pretty much forgotten, even though they kept on putting out (mostly mediocre) albums.

Come 2002, and Sparks released an album that Record Collector later described as:
Quote:
it really does feel like one of the best albums ever made
Ever since, Sparks has enjoyed hefty cult popularity, touring for packed out mid-sized venues all over Europe, and still putting out albums that do get noticed and do sell well.

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Old 04-13-2019, 05:21 AM
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Kylie Minogue. From one hit wonder with I Should Be So Lucky in 1987, back when she was a teen soap actress in Australia, to being pretty much remembered with slight embarrassment as an eighties thing, to her resurgence as an electropop diva in 2001 with hits like Can't Get You Out Of My Head or Slow.
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Old 04-13-2019, 05:44 AM
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OK, I have just been properly chastised by my wife. She reminded me that "The Voice" from Long Distance Voyager was very big in 1981. My defense is that it was generally considered to be a one-off from a band past its prime. I still maintain that the Moodies weren't "back" until 1986.
Huh. As a big Moodies fan myself, I'd regard "Your Wildest Dreams" pretty much the same way as you (and I) regard "The Voice." They were really mostly a legacy band by the late 1980s. I caught them at Wolf Trap in 1987, IIRC, and sure, they played a good deal of their more recent stuff before intermission, but the real draw was the songs from their classic period that ended after Seventh Sojourn.
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Old 04-13-2019, 07:18 AM
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The Grateful Dead had a resurgence in popularity near the end of their run with Touch of Grey.
It was no where near the end of their run. Jerry died ten years after that song became a hit.
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Old 04-13-2019, 08:06 AM
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Aerosmith has been mentioned already. Alice Cooper had a rough go of it in the early 80's with a couple of albums that only the diehards love. New wave kind of fucked him up, he sounded like he was struggling to fit in. (Plus fighting an alcohol problem.) When Metal got big, Alice found his new home.
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Old 04-13-2019, 08:24 AM
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It was no where near the end of their run. Jerry died ten years after that song became a hit.
In the Dark was the 12th out of 13 studio albums, not including the album with Bob Dylan. Jerry died in '95, eight years later.
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Old 04-13-2019, 08:33 AM
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Bob Dylan was popular in the early 1960's folk scene, crashed his motorcycle and went into seclusion in 1966, then hit the comeback trail as a totally different type of musician in the 1970's.
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Old 04-13-2019, 08:35 AM
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In the Dark was the 12th out of 13 studio albums, not including the album with Bob Dylan. Jerry died in '95, eight years later.
So not nearly at the end of their run.
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Old 04-13-2019, 08:45 AM
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The Beach Boy were considered has-beens by 1969. Brian Wilson's projects were delayed and he withdrew from the band. I went to see them about that time and they couldn't even draw 150 people to a free outdoor concert. They switched record labels in 1970 and then rebranded themselves as a nostalgia act and had a rebirth.
Granted, but as far as I can tell they only had one Top Ten hit in the 1970s: their cover of Rock and Roll Music, which made it to #5. Near as I can tell, that was the only time they cracked the Top Ten from the start of ‘67 to the end of ‘87.

But then, in ‘88, they hit #1 with Kokomo.
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Old 04-13-2019, 08:45 AM
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In the Dark was the 12th out of 13 studio albums, not including the album with Bob Dylan. Jerry died in '95, eight years later.
Since this is the Straight Dope, and it is apparently de rigueur here to out-nitpick each other on trivial minutiae, "Touch Of Grey" was written by Garcia/Hunter back in the early 1980's and first played live by the Grateful Dead in 1983, even though the hit album "In The Dark" that the song became the standout single on wasn't released until Summer 1987.
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Old 04-13-2019, 08:55 AM
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Not a band, but Andrew Lloyd Webber's first show Joseph went nowhere, he and Tim Rice hit it big with Jesus Christ Superstar, he and Alan Ayckborn's show Jeeves totally flopped, he and Rice did well with Evita.

THEN he did CATS and became a theatre composer superstar.
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Old 04-13-2019, 08:58 AM
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Think that Neil Sedaka deserves a mention here.
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Old 04-13-2019, 09:14 AM
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So not nearly at the end of their run.
If you think that one more studio album and touring with a declining Jerry Garcia who could barely sing by the 90's didn't mean they were near the end, there's nothing I can say to you. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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Old 04-13-2019, 09:57 AM
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Sparks had a string of hit songs and albums in the mid-70's, were critically lauded, and were featured everywhere, from the Top of the Pops to Teeny Magazine covers. By the 80's they were pretty much forgotten, even though they kept on putting out (mostly mediocre) albums.

Come 2002, and Sparks released an album that Record Collector later described as: Ever since, Sparks has enjoyed hefty cult popularity, touring for packed out mid-sized venues all over Europe, and still putting out albums that do get noticed and do sell well.
Their resurgence came earlier than that. The delightfully-titled Gratuitous Sax & Senseless Violins came out in 1994, and got quite a bit of airplay as I remember.
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Old 04-13-2019, 11:17 AM
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I'm amazed that the only mention of David Bowie here is as the man who revived Mott The Hoople's career. What about the man himself? Nothing between Space Oddity in 1969 and Starman in 1072 (not counting Oh! You Pretty Things as recorded by Peter Noone, which was a hit in the UK at least).

Roxy Music fit the pattern of successful, broke up, reformed, successful again.

But the one that I find most interesting is Ian Dury, because it was all on merit. After modest success in Kilburn and the Highroads, suddenly a star with Sex and Drugs and Rock and Roll et al, huge for a couple of years (77-79), lost his way completely. And then with Mr Love Pants (1998) an unexpected return to form and modest success cut short by illness and his untimely death. That's Rock n Roll for you.

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Old 04-13-2019, 11:54 AM
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Cher. Maybe the biggest resurgence ever from an American pop star?
Cher's carrer has been quite resilient. Sometimes she took a detour into television or movies. But her music has always remained popular.

She had a minor hit slump in the early eighties and then blew away the charts with If I Could Turn Back Time in 1989. Walking in Memphis in 95, and then Believe hit number 1 in 1998.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cher...es_discography
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Old 04-13-2019, 12:46 PM
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Do the Eagles count since they broke up for a while?
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Old 04-13-2019, 02:05 PM
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Do the Eagles count since they broke up for a while?
They didn't break up. They just took a 14 year vacation.
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Old 04-13-2019, 03:33 PM
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I'm amazed that the only mention of David Bowie here is as the man who revived Mott The Hoople's career. What about the man himself? Nothing between Space Oddity in 1969 and Starman in 1072 (not counting Oh! You Pretty Things as recorded by Peter Noone, which was a hit in the UK at least).
Three years isn't that long, many artists have had such a hiatus. You could make a case for his late, 10-year silence (2003-2013), though.
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Old 04-13-2019, 03:52 PM
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In 1986, Paul Simon was like an aged, washed up, all-but-forgotten ball player, limping up to the plate for seemingly one final at bat, long after the glory days of Simon & Garfunkel from the 60's were over and what remained of his career during the late 70's-early 80's was bland, forgettable mediocrity defined, but by G-D did he ever hit it out clean out of the park with the undisputed masterwork of "Graceland".
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Old 04-13-2019, 03:55 PM
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Fountains of Wayne had a few songs on the radio in 1997 or so, and then were almost forgotten only to resurge with Stacy's Mom in 2003.

I saw them in Orlando at a small club in the late 2000s and opening for them was ... New Found Glory. Who later staged a comeback of their own and are now back to headlining and/or large venues.
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Old 04-13-2019, 04:41 PM
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Dusty Springfield didn't chart anywhere after 1970, until she teamed up with Pet Shop Boys in 1987 and went to no.2 in the UK and US.

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Old 04-13-2019, 05:28 PM
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Johnny Cash.
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Old 04-13-2019, 05:35 PM
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If the Doobie Brothers ever get popular again, they'll fit here. I mean they have the forgotten thing down cold.
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Old 04-13-2019, 06:42 PM
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Cheap Trick had four U.S. Top 40 hits in 1978/79, then pretty much disappeared for seven years, after which they notched four more Top 40 songs, including a #1 hit, in 1986/1987.
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Old 04-13-2019, 08:25 PM
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Robert Johnson.
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Old 04-13-2019, 08:37 PM
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Ben E. King was largely forgotten until the movie Stand by Me came out.
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Old 04-13-2019, 08:59 PM
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Johnny Cash.
Yes. And didn't Glen Campbell have a comeback with Rhinestone Cowboy and Southern Nights?

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Old 04-13-2019, 09:35 PM
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Cher. Maybe the biggest resurgence ever from an American pop star?
And I think she did it at least twice.

Which reminds me of Tina Turner.
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