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Old 06-07-2019, 09:04 PM
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Have you reached a point in your career where you just want to ride it out until retirement?


I've been reading the thread in Mundane about people's careers today vs. 2000.

It occurred to me that I'm no longer interested in any major career changes. The computer field has changed so much since I started in the late 1980's. I started as a COBOL programmer and now do SQL and other query languages. I no longer have any interest in learning a new language or development tool. Programming for the web has never interested me. I do a little HTML updating the dept's web page and that's enough.

That doesn't mean I don't want to learn and grow as a person. I'm deeply involved in studying music and reviving my passion for performing. I've even considered college classes in music after retirement. My wife & I have discussed relocating to Austin where there's a thriving arts & music scene.

I've got a few more years until retirement. I'll continue giving my best effort. I'm not interested in changing jobs or moving into a new technical area. I'm not forty anymore. That ship sailed awhile ago. I was still ambitious and career driven in 2000. Today, not so much.

Last edited by aceplace57; 06-07-2019 at 09:08 PM.
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Old 06-07-2019, 09:30 PM
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yes
  #3  
Old 06-07-2019, 10:38 PM
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To me the decision to retire wasn’t the work, it was the people I worked for. When your boss tells you that his boss said the the best chance he had at promotion was to eliminate my job, teamwork kinda went out the window. Interestingly, at least 2 of my former “leaders” got canned after I left. You’d think a couple of born again Christians would understand the “thou shall not steal” thingy.
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Old 06-07-2019, 10:48 PM
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Coasting is a perfectly rational response. They know you're not going to be finding another job with a few years to go, so they don't need to give you raises in order to keep you.
My last four years I designed and built from scratch a system which was vital to our division. I had some help in stuff I didn't feel like learning, but it was 80% mine. Everyone used it and I had a blast doing it. Was I rewarded? Nah. But though I warned them I was retiring, they ignored me, and I got it all back by them letting me work one day a week for full pay for the last four months while it got taken over by others.
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Old 06-07-2019, 11:01 PM
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I'd enjoy one last project that I could develop.

I've done some work on a separate database for reporting. Queries on the big database require complicated table linking & selections to get the current job records and deductions.

A reporting database would only have current active employees, their current job record and deductions. Eliminating a lot of work to create accurate reports

I've purposed getting training on MYSQL or it's open source replacement MariaDB. I'll proceed if the Admin budgets for training and developer support.

I'd have to create the database and then migrate all the reports. Then train the staff that write reports. Easily a year long job.

It would be a satisfying end to my career in a few years.

Last edited by aceplace57; 06-07-2019 at 11:04 PM.
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Old 06-07-2019, 11:03 PM
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I'm there now. Six more years and I qualify for a pension. After that I can't see working more than part-time, if that. I get paid too well to leave; public libraries pay a lot less and I can't get licensed in other school systems without taking several classes (which would be pure hell for someone who always disliked school. Unless I feel like the kids are being cheated by me staying I'll stick it out.
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Old 06-08-2019, 01:21 AM
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No.

Right now I'm (again) at the phase of "ok, these people don't really want what I bring to the table, so I'm gonna look for someone who does". I appear to be biologically incapable of being at the office looking busy and serious while not actually having anything to do.

I've had jobs where it was acceptable to have nothing job-like to do. I can coast in those: I'll sign up for another course in whatever, look for instructional videos, watch cat videos, read or paint my nails, then when something does come up solve it ASAP so I can finish the two nails I hadn't painted yet. But the combination of "every iron I'm supposed to have on the fire is blocked by people who aren't interested in it moving along" with "needing to look busy" kills me.
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Last edited by Nava; 06-08-2019 at 01:22 AM.
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Old 06-08-2019, 02:26 AM
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I reached that point at around age 50. I was mid-level management and the company was beginning what evolved into a failed reorganization. My position offered little challenge or interest and I coasted for the next 5 years and now the company pays me monthly to never return. Fortunately, their benefits and 401K were pretty darn good.

I left at the right time and have never been more content with my life.
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Old 06-08-2019, 05:50 AM
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I reached that point around 2012. I had been working on the same software, for the same group, in the same cubicle for literally ten years. Any attempt to change, grow, or branch out was quashed. My ranking continued to decline and eventually reached a low enough point that I was denied raises and in the layoff pool.

In late 2012, I was briefly loaned to a faraway business unit which did research projects (mainly for DARPA). I saw what they were trying to do for a flight test and offered to write some control code to solve a problem. It worked, the test was successful, and I was offered a position immediately. I accepted, and my ranking went from the bottom to the highest in one year. Since then I've been getting the largest raises of my career, consistently. I'm also working on some of the most advanced software (to me anyway), AI, UAVs, image and pattern recognition, you name it.

So I got back in the game, so to speak. I've never enjoyed work this much, or had so much control over my projects, time, and equipment.

But... as I mentioned in another thread, I still get frustrated by the micro-humiliations of corporate life. No matter how good my immediate supervisors are, a bunch of useless suits above them continue to work at making employees' lives miserable -- ratcheting the misery up, one tiny indignity at a time. Despite the enjoyable work and my fantastic co-workers, I finally reached maximum lifetime degradation and turned in my retirement papers last month. For those few who I respect (my group) I worked pretty hard to complete my obligations and projects thru end of June. They're done now, and for the next few weeks I'm coasting and gathering loose ends (mainly documenting what I've done).

When I attend meetings and they are stressed and discussing flight test schedules, and travel and milestones, it's different for me now. It's a lot like being on a business trip and watching the local news in your hotel room. Mildly interesting, but none of it applies to me.

Last edited by pullin; 06-08-2019 at 05:53 AM. Reason: punctuation
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Old 06-08-2019, 06:43 AM
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I reached that point at about 50, sometimes I would feel motivated to try and move up but it didn't last long. I felt secure safe and was looking forward to not jeopardizing my retirement. I am 70 now and still have many personal goals I pursue.
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Old 06-08-2019, 12:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nava View Post
No.

Right now I'm (again) at the phase of "ok, these people don't really want what I bring to the table, so I'm gonna look for someone who does". I appear to be biologically incapable of being at the office looking busy and serious while not actually having anything to do.
Can you create a project for yourself? I had times when I didn't have much to do, so I poked around, found some gaps, and wrote some code for them. Some of it worked, some of it didn't, but it was a lot more fun than sitting around.
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Old 06-08-2019, 01:23 PM
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Yes, I’m just riding it out until retirement . But I have my own business and I’m retiring in 5 months. I’m basically winding down some aspects of the business and transferring out others.

But I definitely have one foot out the door. If my home improvement contractors weren’t so freaking slow, I might be out by now. But renovating my current place is a vital part of the “ retiring and moving away” project, It would be very disadvantageous to try sell or rent my place in its current condition.
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Old 06-08-2019, 01:31 PM
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In the federal government, there is a phenomenon called "retired in place".

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Old 06-08-2019, 02:16 PM
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I have mixed feelings.

Educational administration in NC is pretty bad. It's so politicized--the board of education is a constant political football, and our state superintendent is an ambitious, dishonest weasel. Yesterday on the last day of school I got two glossy flyers with his face on them that I was supposed to send home with students; they were barely-disguised campaign flyers and included a URL to a website that provides very distorted information about the public education budget in NC. (I made them available to students who wanted to take them, and encouraged my third graders to read what he said, and then to Google responses to what he said. Any more than that, and I figured I'd be crossing the same line that he was tapdancing over).

Also yesterday he announced the end to a major K-3 educational policy, which involves his signing all K-3 students in the state up with a different private corporation for testing. It's unclear how frequent the testing will be, but folks who've worked with this company in other states report literal daily testing of kindergarteners using this online system. He announced it only to principals, but some principals reposted the announcement online. None of us had any idea this change was coming, because we sure as hell weren't consulted.

****

And I love my job.

We ended the school year in chaos. On Wednesday, we planned to hold our capstone economics project (a Tailgate Market where third graders sold real goods and services for real money, with proceeds going to our garden program and field trip scholarship program, as a way to learn about economics and entrepreneurial ventures). But a broken water line meant that we left school early, because please believe me that nobody wants to be in a building with 500 children and no flushing toilets. We returned on Thursday to a boil water advisory (awesome for our kids selling lemonade), to a school community that hadn't been reminded to bring money for a second day given the postponement, to unannounced EOG testing in the building that required modified movement through the school, and to a FREAKING BEAR wandering through our parking lot.

And we ROCKED that market so hard, earning far more than we had in any previous year.

I was so exhausted on Friday (which due to the early release on Wednesday was unexpectedly turned from a noon-release into a 2:45 release). So tired. But I told my students what an amazing year I had, how proud I was of each of them both academically and in terms of the support they showed each other, and I gave and got all the hugs and sent them home.

Am I coasting? Hell no. I've learned to devalue certain things that the state wants me to prioritize (EOGs can suck...an egg, let's say). And I can roll with the day-to-day craziness inherent in the profession. But so much of the job is amazing.

I hope I never coast.

Last edited by Left Hand of Dorkness; 06-08-2019 at 02:17 PM.
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Old 06-08-2019, 02:22 PM
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I had the feeling a few years ago. Now I'm retired.
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Old 06-08-2019, 02:23 PM
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Nope. The more experience I get, the more interesting cases I get.
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Old 06-08-2019, 02:27 PM
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No! I’ve got 15-20 years probably, and I hate my job with the passion of a million burning suns.

Even if I wanted to ride it out, I wouldn’t. The Chicago office isn’t growing and the company is starting to get cheap again. They cancelled the annual summer employee party and have put in even tighter business travel restrictions.

I hate job hunting but I have to do it.
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Old 06-08-2019, 02:41 PM
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Yes, in EVERY CAREER I’VE EVER BEEN IN. Four, to date. Unfortunately, I’ve been laid off four times. Which is the life-stress-equivalent of having four parents die.

The last time was five years ago. The Ukulele Lady said to me “What with my munificent salary, our real estate and investments...you don’t need to get another job.” So I retired. Now she’s saying “DON’T YOU WANT TO WORK?”

No. Cooking and cleaning, taking care of a Brooklyn brownstone with two tenants, waiting around for electricians and plumbers, fills up my time.
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Old 06-08-2019, 02:44 PM
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There's no way I can go up in my current workplace without being management, and I'm just not interested in that. So I guess you can say I plan to "ride it out" in terms of not climbing any more ladders.

But I'm not content with just doing the bare minimum. I've got 18 more years before I can retire, so it would be premature for me to become wallpaper right now.
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Old 06-08-2019, 03:29 PM
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I don't know how to answer this. My job had three parts: teaching, research, administration. The last was boring and I wasn't very good at it and did as little as I could. Especially towards the end. I enjoyed teaching well enough, but was not passionate about it and, when the financial incentive for early retirement got too large I took it. Nineteen years later I still love research and still do it, although there are no financial rewards for doing so. I am, in fact, just putting the final touches on a paper.
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Old 06-08-2019, 03:32 PM
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I reached that point the day I entered the workforce. *shrug*
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Old 06-08-2019, 04:22 PM
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Riding it out is exactly what I'm doing.

I am eligible for social security in 9 months, but I'll probably work another 3-6 years.

There is literally not a day that I don't think about retirement.


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Old 06-08-2019, 04:28 PM
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I'm looking for the next thing to do, but that's probably not going to be in my primary field of employment. I'm probably going to fade slowly away at that. I'm eligible to retire early, and thinking I might do that and take up teaching, or work part time and see if I can get a tutoring gig.
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Old 06-08-2019, 05:25 PM
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I was planning to coast after I hit 50. Then I got laid off, found another job for three years, got laid off again, spent a year doing contract work, got another job, was laid off after a year, and financed two kids final years of college with loans while scrambling to find enough work to pay my health insurance until I was finally old enough for Medicare.

I guess that makes my answer, "yes and no."
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Old 06-08-2019, 05:57 PM
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I'll be retiring soon, and returning as a high priced consultant, part time. Patient care only, no administration (which is what's truly been sucking the life out of me). I plan on 3 months off to recharge my batteries a bit before I return.
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Old 06-08-2019, 06:25 PM
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Like the OP, I started out as a COBOL programmer in the 1970s. It was a great gig and, despite narratives to the contrary, I worked for and with honorable men who were willing to give a female neophyte a chance. Not just that, but they took an active and supportive interest. I didn't need much help to generate product, but appreciated their willingness to make room for me and accommodate comradeship.

Later on, I moved into Assembly language, C, SQL, SAS, Informatica, toyed with web development, upgraded databases and did some sysadmin work for a bit. It has been diverse.

I'm in my 60s now and I work for a great team and a great company and great management, but I find myself becoming grumpy. I don't mind chaos at all - it gets the juices flowing. Currently, I'm in boring mode and rewriting a poorly-designed and poorly-written application. That's ok, I can pretty much do that with my brain tied behind my back.

I have little to no patience for bureaucracy, and even less patience for being patronized by officious HR training courses. After 40+ years in the corporate world, if you offer it I've probably already seen it.

As a result of these nuisances, I find myself getting impatient and grouchy at times. Thankfully, working from home has made it possible for me to curse and swear and tell them what I think - all with no repercussions.

As an older woman, I seem to be invisible to other people (unless they want money). It's so weird, let me tell you. When I was younger and pretty and a bit unique for my time, people were interested. I've always had a strong personality, but am friendly and easygoing. That hasn't changed, so I don't know what the difference is, except for age.

At least people listen to me at work. It's the only place where my ideas matter. Within work, our team shares a comraderie and respect for each other's ideas. Plus, work pays me well to contribute my ideas and they are interested in my insights. In the outside world, I'm just another invisible old lady. I'll hang around for a while longer.
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Old 06-08-2019, 06:51 PM
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I am retired (emeritus professor), but I still teach one-half or one class a year. Most of my time I send writing an on-line text. I'm not going to another publisher ever; that's the retired part.
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Old 06-08-2019, 07:06 PM
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No.

Turning 60 this year and have no plans to stop at any particular point. I have fun at my work.
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Old 06-08-2019, 08:00 PM
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I'm a low level grunt in the warehouse of a manufacturing plant. I have no hope of advancement so the answer is yes. I'm getting the job done. It's a comfortable rut. I make enough to keep my life running. At 62 I have no illusions of advancing at my current job and no desire to go out looking for something new at this point.
  #30  
Old 06-08-2019, 08:22 PM
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But... as I mentioned in another thread, I still get frustrated by the micro-humiliations of corporate life. No matter how good my immediate supervisors are, a bunch of useless suits above them continue to work at making employees' lives miserable -- ratcheting the misery up, one tiny indignity at a time.
This is my predicament.
I have a ways to go before i think of retiring but my upper management ( I work for a large multinational corporation) has successfully adopted the "engagement survey" way of doing work.
We do these engagement surveys every year (they are supposedly anonymous) and then based on how we scored upper mgt (they want to see that they improved every year) we are punished with "roundtables and discussions" until we cry uncle.
There are no ways that we are told how to make more $$ because apparently engagement means you don't want to get paid more.
Meanwhile they use these "scores" to advertise the company as great for work environment because it is so engaged. They also use the inclusion push to make sure they hire any and all .... as long as you are under 38 years old.
  #31  
Old 06-08-2019, 11:14 PM
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I am 50 and just left my job of 12 years yesterday, to start another job in the same field at a much higher salary on Monday. I'd like what I do (immigration law) much better of we didn't have the current Federal administration that we do, but it's been sucking the life out of me. (I quit my old job because I simply can't hack dealing with asylum cases, deportation, domestic violence-related cases, etc., which the new employer doesn't handle at all. Plus a gigantic raise for the first time in a looooong time didn't hurt, either.)

I feel like my work is interesting, has a real purpose, and improves people's lives. However, it stresses me out. Every once in a while, Tom Scud and I ask each other, "if we cashed out everything we own, is there anywhere in the world where we could live on the proceeds for the rest of our lives?" So far the answer is "maybe a village in India." Of course, then you're living in a village in India, and we are first-world city people, so we aren't in a position to retire just yet.

Given my current skillset and lack of a law degree, there isn't really anything I can be promoted to in my current field except maybe law firm administrative management, and I think I would hate that. So until my job becomes a felony, the plan is to stick it out until I retire or inherit an unexpectedly large amount of money. Otherwise I am about to start what is probably close to the highest-paying job in the city for someone with my skillset on Monday.
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Old 06-08-2019, 11:19 PM
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I'm retiring from teaching after one more semester, and I want to go out on a high note. So I'm going to have the most field trips, the most potlucks, the most classes outdoors that I've ever had.

But tell ya what I'm "coasting" about... anything EXCEPT the students. Meaningless paperwork? Interminable meetings? Joining multiple committees that don't really do anything? ... Sorry, I guess I forgot.
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Old 06-09-2019, 06:41 AM
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I've been at the same place for 26 years and have no intention of changing. I've got at least 5 till retirement maybe more.

Yes, I'm going to 'ride it out' but there will be plenty of new developments in my field (GIS) that I will need to learn. It changes very, very fast.
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Old 06-09-2019, 06:42 AM
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Mixed. I'm 62 and am guessing I'll retire at 66.5 but that's not a hard plan yet.

I have a very nice job. It's interesting and stimulating and is the reason I meet many wonderful people. I have a lot of freedom to grow intellectually and professionally, and the work/life balance is good.

On the other hand, I've been working pretty solidly since 1974, and there are ways in which I'm tired. It only takes a little bit of having to do dog-and-pony shows, or acting ambitious for people half my age, to feel annoyed. And I have health issues that make me wonder how many years I will get once I can choose where to spend an additional 40 of my best hours every week.

Some years ago I got the performance review conversation where they told me that, given my years there, they know what they're likely to get out of me. I have a friend a couple years older at the same company, and she applied for a leadership position when she was 60, and the team told her the position was reserved for 30 to 45 year olds (apparently this is a common thing and what makes it remarkable is only somebody not realizing they're supposed to keep the requirement secret).

So, I'm pretty happy, and with good cause. I do good work and I care about the people I'm helping. But I also realize that it wouldn't take much negative change there to change my mind.
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Old 06-09-2019, 11:44 AM
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Before I retired from my DOD career, I made it clear to my boss that I had no desire to be a supervisor or a manager. I was perfectly happy being a worker-bee. Thankfully, he accepted that. I'm not so sure that was coasting, exactly, but it was a comfortable way to spend my last few years there - doing what I knew how to do and not worrying about what the next step would be.

Similarly, in my post-retirement job (I got bored being retired) I made it clear to my boss that I want to be a drafter, not an engineer. The tedious parts of being an engineer overshadow the fun stuff for me, but as a drafter, I don't have to deal with meetings, budgets, travel, or design reviews. I just take the stuff from the young engineers and give them the drawings they need to have their stuff built and assembled. They'll occasionally ask me to do some modifications to their designs, so I get to play with the modeling software, but that's about it. This bit of coasting is (theoretically) going to take me to December when I re-retire. Theoretically.
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Old 06-09-2019, 02:28 PM
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OP, except for your field of work, I could have written that post. I'm 63, and looking forward to my retirement, because I'll have a lot of time to pursue what I want to pursue, which is music. I spent 20 years in my first career (respiratory therapy -- good job but not rewarding in the long term). I love my current job as a children's librarian, and I feel like I've left my legacy and given to my community with years of highly entertaining children's programs, and I love the people I work with and the work I do, but 20 years... I'm ready for the next thing. I had a meeting with my manager last week about my 1 year and 5 year goals. I said my work goals are this: 1 year goal -- don't get fired. 2 year goal -- don't get fired. 3 year goal -- be retired. We had a good laugh (she's a great manager) and she understood exactly where I'm coming from. I had to take a long break from music to address my son's ongoing medical issues, but I'm at a place now where I'm ready to get back into it in new and exciting ways. Good luck to you, aceplace57!
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Old 06-09-2019, 02:47 PM
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No. If I want to eat, I'll have to work until I die.
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Old 06-09-2019, 03:07 PM
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I was planning to retire at 59, which was the first year that I could get a full pension with no reduction (well, a 3% reduction over waiting until 62). But I never made it. My company's management changed, and became completely dysfunctional. Our engineering group was completely remotely managed by people who had no idea what they were doing. So the last five years of my work were so frustrating that it just sapped all the will to keep working in software out of me.

Then the bad management caught up to us, and mass layoffs showed up. Our entire development office was shut down. Because at this time I was a couple of years from earliest retirement, they gave me early retirement, and now I'm not working. And in my city, there's really not a lot of work for a near-retirement software developer. And of course, just about anything else doesn't pay as well. My early retirement salary will be significantly lower than it would have been if I could have stayed working for another three years, but I never got the choice.

It's very hard to stay engaged as you near retirement, especially when you are already feeling sidelined by change and being forced to implement stupid decisions every day.
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Old 06-09-2019, 03:32 PM
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I have about a year and a half or less to retirement. I have been with the company for forty years. I have to admit that I am coasting a bit.
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Old 06-09-2019, 03:47 PM
Sam Stone is online now
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Hell, after forty years you should be racing downhill going "Squeee!"
  #41  
Old 06-09-2019, 04:24 PM
Gatopescado is offline
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Location: on your last raw nerve
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I'm just biding my time waiting to die.
  #42  
Old 06-09-2019, 04:38 PM
velomont is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
Can you create a project for yourself? I had times when I didn't have much to do, so I poked around, found some gaps, and wrote some code for them. Some of it worked, some of it didn't, but it was a lot more fun than sitting around.
I work for a very large Canadian company with locations around the world and I was hired by a group of people who badly wanted my skills and experience. A number of reorgs later and that completely changed. I know, Voyager, that you weren't asking me your question, but my company has a charge-code system that makes it really hard to work on big-picture/global things which are actually necessary.

To the OP, more or less. I just turned 60 a couple of months ago and after a couple of brilliant back-stabbings by a coworker who apparently can do no wrong, I'm done and will coast for another five years while preparing for an emergency exit in two if necessary.
  #43  
Old 06-09-2019, 05:26 PM
Tempe Jeff is offline
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"I am 50 and just left my job of 12 years yesterday, to start another job in the same field at a much higher salary on Monday. I'd like what I do (immigration law) much better of we didn't have the current Federal administration that we do, but it's been sucking the life out of me."

I agree, it's MUCH easier doing Immigration Law with a pro-illegal alien Administration. How do the poor migrants afford your services? Or, are you paid by a benefactor?
  #44  
Old 06-09-2019, 05:28 PM
Tempe Jeff is offline
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In other news, I'm 57 work in a warehouse in the Shipping Department. Only complaint, other than management; is 30 year olds complaining how tired they are at the end of the day. Kinda sucks not playing on your phone all day.Eh, kid?
  #45  
Old 06-09-2019, 06:12 PM
Jackmannii is offline
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Not that "coasting" is really an option in medicine, but there are mindset changes that occur as the retirement light begins to glimmer at the end of the tunnel.

Will health insurance companies find a new, sleazy way to deny reimbursements for services rendered? Is this the year Congress will finally decide not to override the automatic pay cut for Medicare at the last minute, thus triggering 10%+ cuts for doctor fees?

Will my medical staff "colleagues" continue to do stupid shit that makes my day unnecessarily onerous?

I find it more and more difficult to summon up the usual angst.
  #46  
Old 06-09-2019, 06:57 PM
Red Wiggler is offline
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I'm putting my coasting gear into overdrive (underdrive?) for the final one year non-sprint beginning Wednesday. Fifty years of pretty much always having a a job is about my limit.
  #47  
Old 06-09-2019, 07:24 PM
nightshadea is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Left Hand of Dorkness View Post
I have mixed feelings.

Educational administration in NC is pretty bad. It's so politicized--the board of education is a constant political football, and our state superintendent is an ambitious, dishonest weasel. Yesterday on the last day of school I got two glossy flyers with his face on them that I was supposed to send home with students; they were barely-disguised campaign flyers and included a URL to a website that provides very distorted information about the public education budget in NC. (I made them available to students who wanted to take them, and encouraged my third graders to read what he said, and then to Google responses to what he said. Any more than that, and I figured I'd be crossing the same line that he was tapdancing over).

Also yesterday he announced the end to a major K-3 educational policy, which involves his signing all K-3 students in the state up with a different private corporation for testing. It's unclear how frequent the testing will be, but folks who've worked with this company in other states report literal daily testing of kindergarteners using this online system. He announced it only to principals, but some principals reposted the announcement online. None of us had any idea this change was coming, because we sure as hell weren't consulted.

****

And I love my job.

We ended the school year in chaos. On Wednesday, we planned to hold our capstone economics project (a Tailgate Market where third graders sold real goods and services for real money, with proceeds going to our garden program and field trip scholarship program, as a way to learn about economics and entrepreneurial ventures). But a broken water line meant that we left school early, because please believe me that nobody wants to be in a building with 500 children and no flushing toilets. We returned on Thursday to a boil water advisory (awesome for our kids selling lemonade), to a school community that hadn't been reminded to bring money for a second day given the postponement, to unannounced EOG testing in the building that required modified movement through the school, and to a FREAKING BEAR wandering through our parking lot.

And we ROCKED that market so hard, earning far more than we had in any previous year.

I was so exhausted on Friday (which due to the early release on Wednesday was unexpectedly turned from a noon-release into a 2:45 release). So tired. But I told my students what an amazing year I had, how proud I was of each of them both academically and in terms of the support they showed each other, and I gave and got all the hugs and sent them home.

Am I coasting? Hell no. I've learned to devalue certain things that the state wants me to prioritize (EOGs can suck...an egg, let's say). And I can roll with the day-to-day craziness inherent in the profession. But so much of the job is amazing.

I hope I never coast.
werent you guys having a strike vote or was that another teacher on here ?
  #48  
Old 06-10-2019, 05:02 AM
pullin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjankis630 View Post
This is my predicament.
We do these engagement surveys every year (they are supposedly anonymous) and then based on how we scored upper mgt (they want to see that they improved every year) we are punished with "roundtables and discussions" until we cry uncle.
There are no ways that we are told how to make more $$ because apparently engagement means you don't want to get paid more.
Meanwhile they use these "scores" to advertise the company as great for work environment because it is so engaged. They also use the inclusion push to make sure they hire any and all .... as long as you are under 38 years old.
At my salary review early this spring I discovered the following: Every co-worker, lead, and manager for whom I'd done work wrote effusive praise. In every case, they stated that my software was not only vital to the completion of their programs, without my contributions schedules would not have been met. I've had several good years, but this was by far the most praise I've received in my career. My managers recommended the highest ranking (and raise) and my senior manager agreed. When all this was submitted, the next suit up the chain quashed it, removed most of my raise, and lowered my rating to average. The reason? I hadn't shown enough "engagement". Apparently I didn't attend enough employee cookouts or something.

Last edited by pullin; 06-10-2019 at 05:02 AM. Reason: punctuation
  #49  
Old 06-10-2019, 06:59 AM
Machine Elf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MoonMoon View Post
I reached that point the day I entered the workforce. *shrug*
This. Occasionally something comes across my desk that's academically interesting (i.e. I'm interested in working on it for reasons other than being told to do so), but the rest of the time it's stuff that I wouldn't consider doing if they didn't pay me. My job is primarily just a way to gather money to pay for the things I do when I'm not at work, and this includes saving aggressively for retirement. When I reach a point where I have high confidence that I will more than enough money to live well for the rest of my life, I'll retire.
  #50  
Old 06-10-2019, 12:51 PM
blondebear is online now
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Having just submitted my 2 week notice, I am definitely in coasting mode. To be honest, I pretty much made up my mind back in December, so I've been riding it out for the last 6 months.
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