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Old 08-10-2019, 12:51 PM
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Have mass shootings ever affected how you live or think?


I have never once been afraid, while in a shopping mall, school or movie theater, that someone might come in with a gun and starting shooting people up. It registers as low as airplane-crash likelihood while flying. I do have plenty of fears or worries - some which people might consider paranoid - but becoming the victim of an El Paso or Dayton has never been one of them.

Do any Dopers here get worried when doing everyday tasks like shopping at Walmart?
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Old 08-10-2019, 01:13 PM
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I was in high school when columbine happened and I had to stop singing songs about killing teachers and blowing up the school and now I can't teach them to my daughters.

Beyond that not really. A couple of years ago there was a nut case with a gun in Isla Vista , CA and I've got a buddy who's a cop there so I worried about him for a couple of seconds, I'm not sure that counts since it didn't really effect my life.
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Old 08-10-2019, 01:15 PM
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I wouldn't say I "get worried", but I carry a concealed weapon daily, and at least a small factor in that decision was the existence of spree shooters.
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Old 08-10-2019, 01:51 PM
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I don't think about it at all. I suppose if I lived someplace where folks like to carry their assault rifles around just because they can, then I might start packing a handgun. And when I come across one of the rifle packers I'd follow them around with my hand on my weapon. If they start getting agitated I'll draw on them and have someone call the cops to report a thwarted public shooting. Let 'em prove I'm wrong. Fucking rifles belong in a safe or on a gun range.
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Old 08-10-2019, 01:57 PM
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Not at all. I figure a) it's vanishingly unlikely that I'd ever get caught in one; and b) if it does happen, it's a matter of random chance and there is nothing meaningful I could do to reduce the likelihood of its happening, so it's not worth thinking about.

Car crashes, OTOH, terrify me and I think about the possibility every time I drive on a highway, to the point where it's totally counterproductive and makes me a much worse driver.
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Old 08-10-2019, 02:05 PM
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For the most part, no. The likelihood of me being involved in a mass shooting is so low that it simply doesn't factor into my daily activities. I've had to take some active shooter courses at work and speak to employees about it and we're planning on installing a panic button when we remodel HR. I don't believe any of our employees changed their habits as a result of those discussions. Prior to this active shooter course I did note that HR had no means of escaping a would be shooter because we only had access to one of the exits which is the same one a shooter would likely come through but we fixed that.
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Old 08-10-2019, 02:15 PM
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If the situation should ever arise, I'll deal with it to the best of my ability. But until then, it's totally not my concern. I refuse to allow this particular insanity to in any way take over my thoughts or feelings. For example, I refuse to even consider buying a gun. To do so would be implying that mass shootings are clear and present dangers, which they are not. Life consists of more than simply avoiding death.
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Old 08-10-2019, 02:37 PM
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No. They are very, very rare*. I am at a much higher risk of death or injury in the car on the way than I am at the destination.


(*The number of course should be completely zero, but across the whole population of the US, the odds of being a victim of a mass shooting is statistically pretty damn close to zero.)
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Old 08-10-2019, 02:46 PM
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One of my employees called out for a few days because one of her relatives was involved in the Dayton shootings, that was annoying being short staffed.

My community spent a whole bunch of money building a really cool observation tower over the fairgrounds. It was completed about a week before the Vegas shootings. It then was closed to the public. I don't know that I was ever planning on going up and seeing the view, but now I cannot.

Last night, there was an unexpected fireworks show (I think). I looked out my window and couldn't see anything, but there's bunch of trees in the way. Actually sounded like gunfire coming from the town square, but I figured that if someone was shooting it up, I'd be hearing sirens by now. Were it not for the recent shooting, that thought probably wouldn't have crossed my mind.
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Old 08-10-2019, 02:47 PM
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I couldn't function if I were that worried about something that could happen essentially everywhere.

But, I have children who hear about this stuff. They get anxious and sad about it, and I feel bad for them. And when I visit their elementary school, sad to say, I am scanning for ingresses, defensible positions, fields of fire, objects to use as improvised weapons.

I know it's statistically unlikely anything will happen, but after hearing about the unthinkable happening over and over and over, it's hard not to think about it.
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Old 08-10-2019, 02:53 PM
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In terms of how I go through my day and live my life, there's no great effect. I go to work, pay my taxes, obey the law as best I can and mostly try to be a good, responsible, gun owning citizen.

Every time one happens though, I get a little more convinced that my fellow Americans and I have the leadership we deserve.
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Old 08-10-2019, 03:15 PM
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Like others, it does not figure into my concerns. The odds just aren't there.

I'm pretty good at spotting people who are behaving oddly or appear to be out of place, and then compensating for that. Take in and evaluate your surroundings. Pay attention. It's just something I've always done.

I grew up in a rural community where there was lots of farming and hunting and people with gun racks in their pickup trucks. It's out of place today and you certainly can't display a gun in your truck's gun rack. Guns themselves don't bother me, but it's the context that's important. Anyone carrying a long gun in a shopping mall should obviously alert your spidey senses and cause you to get out.

Ultimately, though, the actual numbers don't justify the fear. If I was smart, I'd be more concerned about getting in the car and driving to work or school. It seems that going to the hospital (medical error) is far more likely to kill you than a spree killer. They are more mundane events, so people don't really think about how dangerous those things are.

Humans are visual creatures - big, splashy, in-your-face visual events make more of an impression than all of the numbers in the world.
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Old 08-10-2019, 03:54 PM
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Somewhat. The Parkland shootings was at a rival high school of mine. Yes, I’m well out of high school, but that one hit me hard.

My best friend was from Virginia and his mother worked at VA tech during that shooting.
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Old 08-10-2019, 04:06 PM
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has not impacted me.

Last year at a local mall there was a panic where some people thought there was a shooter but there was none. People were hiding in stores and calling loved ones saying goodbye. Some of the people were so upset they ended up with PTSD or close to that.
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Old 08-10-2019, 04:14 PM
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I avoid crowds more than I used to, but I'm really not worried about shooters. I am more worried that if anything at all happened (some kind of accident, for example) the crowd would be full of idiots that would freak out (like the ones Bijou Drains mentions) and stampede and trample me!
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Old 08-10-2019, 04:31 PM
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Not really. I am licensed to carry a concealed weapon and have more than one handgun suitable for that task, but I very seldom do, because my chances of needing it during my mundane everyday activities are so very small. I also pay close attention to my surroundings and if my spidey sense tingles, I leave.

People think that 'mass shootings' are a lot more common than they really are because the news media like to sensationalize them, and some people hammer on them because they have an axe to grind.
In fact Neil deGrasse Tyson got a lot of flack recently for pointing out that there are a lot of other things in our lives that have a better chance of killing us. For instance you're twice as likely to die from the flu as from a gunshot wound, but you hardly ever see the nightly news's lead off story about "6 people were killed by the flu today, video after the break."
He may have been 'tone deaf', but he wasn't wrong.
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Old 08-10-2019, 04:35 PM
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Not really. I am licensed to carry a concealed weapon and have more than one handgun suitable for that task, but I very seldom do, because my chances of needing it during my mundane everyday activities are so very small. I also pay close attention to my surroundings and if my spidey sense tingles, I leave.

People think that 'mass shootings' are a lot more common than they really are because the news media like to sensationalize them, and some people hammer on them because they have an axe to grind.
In fact Neil deGrasse Tyson got a lot of flack recently for pointing out that there are a lot of other things in our lives that have a better chance of killing us. For instance you're twice as likely to die from the flu as from a gunshot wound, but you hardly ever see the nightly news's lead off story about "6 people were killed by the flu today, video after the break."
He may have been 'tone deaf', but he wasn't wrong.
actually around here they talk a lot about flu deaths in the winter. Not a lead story but they seem to bring it up every week how many died last week of the flu
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Old 08-10-2019, 04:47 PM
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I worry a bit because these shootings aren't taking place in "bad areas" by gangs or a turf war. They happen in places like I may be at-- shopping malls, movie theaters, restaurants... So I make note of emergency exit markers if I'm in a new place.

Last edited by Locrian; 08-10-2019 at 04:47 PM.
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Old 08-10-2019, 06:46 PM
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They make me hate Republicans even more, with every passing one. And as a member of a racial minority, it's impossible to dissociate the violence from Trump's race-baiting and the rise of the American Nazi movement. It's pretty clear that a race war is what the Right wants, with ethnonationalism being their preferred strategy in times of global uncertainty -- immigrants/refugees, economic disparity, climate crisis, all connected, all answered by genocidal white supremacy. It's always the same cries after every shooting: we need more gun control, more mental health care, less racism, a less toxic vision of masculinity, etc., and it's always the same people, old white Republican men virtue signaling to lost young white boys, who forestall change because it works in their favor. Getting the working class to shoot each other based on skin color and birthplace is a great way to prevent them from working together towards political and economic power.

In the short term, that means I'm considering concealed carry as a last resort. But then chances are good I'd just be randomly shot by law enforcement instead. In the long term, it certainly feels as though a civil war looms ever closer, or another series of concentration camps. First the Indians, then the Japanese, then the Chinese, then the Muslims, then the Mexicans... who's next?

The mass shootings are statistically unlikely to directly harm me, but the ideology they espouse -- ethnonationalism enforced by genocidal capitalism -- has a lot of appeal to the Republicans, and that has absolutely measurable harm. I certainly no longer feel safe in the United States of America, even as a citizen, especially anywhere between the coasts. The shootings are just the vanguard, but the mainstream Right isn't far behind them. Whether by ammunition or by policy, their goals are the same.
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Old 08-10-2019, 06:53 PM
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I wouldn't say I "get worried", but I carry a concealed weapon daily, and at least a small factor in that decision was the existence of spree shooters.
So, if you're not worried, why then is it a part of your decision to carry?
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Old 08-10-2019, 07:00 PM
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A not too-distant cousin of mine got killed. I never met him, but it made me wonder how long before these things will hit closer.
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Old 08-10-2019, 07:13 PM
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Not at all.

Statistically death by mass shootings is too small to measure. A few hundred deaths out of an estimated population of 329,338,934. (Live number that constantly updates)
https://www.worldometers.info/world-...us-population/

Last edited by aceplace57; 08-10-2019 at 07:15 PM.
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Old 08-10-2019, 07:19 PM
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So, if you're not worried, why then is it a part of your decision to carry?
Waiting/hoping for the opportunity to kill someone.
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Old 08-10-2019, 07:27 PM
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Waiting/hoping for the opportunity to kill someone.
I'm willing to let him respond before I go there. But getting there is real easy.
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Old 08-10-2019, 08:02 PM
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I wouldn't say I "get worried", but I carry a concealed weapon daily, and at least a small factor in that decision was the existence of spree shooters.
I've carried almost daily since about 1979; around our rural area before that. The spree/mass shooter thing was never a factor. Even now its as much from force of habit as it is the odds of getting caught in something like that. But what has changed is my sense of my fellow humans; their humanity. That something like this has become common enough for this to even be a question disturbs me. It isn't effecting my life ---- but it does make me sad.
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Old 08-10-2019, 08:55 PM
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Spree shootings and terrorism have directly impacted my life 3 times. Upon reflection, it's not a top level thought but I do always check for exits, and spend a few quick seconds thinking about a plan to get out or hide. I'm teaching my kids to do the same.
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Old 08-10-2019, 09:17 PM
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actually around here they talk a lot about flu deaths in the winter. Not a lead story but they seem to bring it up every week how many died last week of the flu
The one person I have known personally who died from influenza was borderline-elderly and had several chronic health conditions. Even though her death was really not a big surprise, I still miss her.

I was a student at the University of Iowa when this happened, and had taken physics the previous semester. Neither my professor nor my TA were directly involved (i.e. shot) but I did remember seeing the three professors walking around in the building.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Univer..._Iowa_shooting

The night after it happened, my roommate and I went to a Halloween party hosted by another friend of mine. Nobody had much fun, and we didn't stay very long. Several years ago, I found out that the host's daughter, who is now 24 and graduated from there, had never heard about it at all.

p.s. The host lost her best friend in a murder/suicide at their school, by a boy who had relentlessly stalked her for a couple of years. Every time her family went to the authorities, SHE was told that SHE had to stay away from him, and AFAIK nobody ever told him to knock it off and leave her alone except her father.

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Old 08-10-2019, 10:56 PM
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It has somewhat. It gets worse when Maga-hat Fucking Mooks try their intimidation techniques while reaching into a pocket, and you don't know if they actually have a gun or are going for it for the Mook-Lulz.

It makes me wonder if I should pack, although that would probably end with some little shit crying on the ground, covered in his own blood and whining, "...but it was a prank! It was a prank...!"
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Old 08-11-2019, 08:10 AM
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Waiting/hoping for the opportunity to kill someone.
That's an unfair accusation make guys. Be cool.
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Old 08-11-2019, 08:20 AM
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I think it's fair to say that yes, the one that happened 4 miles from my house has affected how I live and how I think.
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Old 08-11-2019, 08:26 AM
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Not at all.

Statistically death by mass shootings is too small to measure. A few hundred deaths out of an estimated population of 329,338,934. (Live number that constantly updates)
https://www.worldometers.info/world-...us-population/
Ditto.
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:09 AM
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I saw this thread a few days ago, but didn't look at it right away. It seemed like the question merited some thought and I didn't want to be influenced by what other have said. In fact I still haven't read any of the replies and I am responding only to the question posed in the title.

On a day to mundane day level, no. Which is not to say that I have never given thought to them, but they don't really factor into my daily inner monologue.

In a more subtle, far reaching sort of way, perhaps the answer is yes. I worry about the state of society and the type of culture my kids and grandkids are going to live in and deal with and this is just one more thing that may be an indicator of how I think things are going. Its sort of difficult to say with certainty though how much impact it has compared to other things in my long term thinking. Predicting the future with accuracy right?
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:19 AM
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The only time I could say it did was during the Beltway Sniper attacks in 2002.

Not that I changed anything, but living in DC during that month you saw - and had to adjust to - some manner of things like some gas stations putting up screens around the pumps and so forth.

Why no other way? Because I can fucking do math. Humans are notoriously bad at assessing and responding to risk. Overreacting personally - and not politically - to spree shooting is an example of that poor judgement.
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:25 AM
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Last night we were headed to Yellow Bridge Brewing when we came to a serious roadblock; three fire trucks blocked the highway just 1/4 mile from the brewery. No problem, I know a backroad that will take me behind the brewery, but that road was blocked by a police car. I tried another way to get there and that road was blocked as well.

Then I recieved a text from a friend who was freaking out. The roadblocks and the police whizzing around in every direction was in response to an "active shooter" (how long has that been in our vocabulary?) in the area.

I calmly switched plans and we detoured to Devout Brewing and that was that. In retrospect I'm surprised we were so blasť about the situation.
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:28 AM
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How I live my life? No. How I vote? Yep.

Life events over the past few years have moved me to the left. Not the least of which is the spate of mass shootings changing my views on gun control. I'm still not in favor of repealing the 2nd Amendment or anything like that, but I definitely support closing loopholes that allow the mentally ill to get guns, for example, and other "common sense" gun legislation.
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:28 AM
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The only time I could say it did was during the Beltway Sniper attacks in 2002.



Not that I changed anything, but living in DC during that month you saw - and had to adjust to - some manner of things like some gas stations putting up screens around the pumps and so forth.



Why no other way? Because I can fucking do math. Humans are notoriously bad at assessing and responding to risk. Overreacting personally - and not politically - to spree shooting is an example of that poor judgement.
It's not a math problem though.
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:51 AM
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It is entirely a math problem, my friend. Just as so many things are when you look at them properly.

Death by mass shooting in the US: 1196 killed (2018 data)

So the incidence there becomes: 1196 divided by 327.2 million (2018 US population, US Census)

Incidence of death by mass shooting? 0.0036553%

Or three-one thousandth of a percent.

This will be a bit unbalance because the good data in 2017.

US Auto accidents in 2018 amounted to 2018. Yet people still drive.
Heart Disease kills about 650,000 per year. Yet people still eat fast food and smoke.
Speaking of smoking, Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease is the #4 killer.

You get the idea. Focus on what is actually going to kill people. Adjusting your behavior, unless it's locking yourself in your home and never ever leaving, to prevent being a part of random violence is a fool's errand. As mentioned above, it's a part of humans being bad at assessing risk. If we were GOOD at assessing risk Las Vegas and the Lottery would go out of business in a week.
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:54 AM
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Still not a math problem. And the people with a bullet in the head didn't fail some quiz.
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Old 08-11-2019, 10:13 AM
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No. They got unlucky.

But you're viewing it through a conclusatory lens. By putting the result at the front of the equation you're assuming those people would be killed. But that sort of thinking is a fallacy and exactly the sort of being poor at risk analysis I mentioned upthread.

Since the incidence of death by spree killing - whatever the motivation - is astonishingly low what would you expect could impact the outcome? Carrying a firearm doesn't seem to impact it. Police presence doesn't seem to impact it. In the recent Dayton shooting police responded within 30 seconds and still 9 people died and a few dozen were injured.

The scariest thing here is that it is random. Humans just don't understand that because it is frightening. But anyone conversant with probability and statistics knows that random things happen all the time. But hating that is the same way we get cries for our leaders to 'do something!' when there's really very little that can be done barring a huge change in American culture.

A few more fun stats.

In the US, the CDC reports that 500-600 people are struck by lightning every year. How should we react to that? Never go out or drive in storms? Place lightning rods every thousand yards (though I might argue cell towers are filling this role already!). The incidence of lightning strikes is about half the incidence of death by mass shooting. Should we devote time to preventing it?

The number of deaths in the United States by dog attacks is growing. It's small - about 40-50 each year - the the number of serious injuries (requiring hospitalization) is between 6000-1300 per year - but growing in incidence. I'm not sure anyone knows why. So the incidence of death by dog attack is floating about 1/30 to 1/20 of mass shootings. What should people do? Avoid dogs altogether?
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Old 08-11-2019, 10:56 AM
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I have never once been afraid, while in a shopping mall, school or movie theater, that someone might come in with a gun and starting shooting people up. It registers as low as airplane-crash likelihood while flying. I do have plenty of fears or worries - some which people might consider paranoid - but becoming the victim of an El Paso or Dayton has never been one of them.

Do any Dopers here get worried when doing everyday tasks like shopping at Walmart?
Answering that actual question, no. Seems a number of the other posts are answering a broader question, like whether mass shootings have changed or intensified their political views, given a more negative outlook on society, etc.

The actual experience of flying makes me unsettled. It's probably to do with a flight I had a reservation for years ago which crashed, everyone killed, I'd had to cancel my reservation at the last minute and book a later flight. Since then I have not been able to help worrying about flying although I know the odds are extremely in my favor. But I do fly.

With mass shooting I have no such emotional baggage, am able to just look at it in terms of probabilities, so I don't worry about being caught in one myself because it's so unlikely. Which doesn't mean I don't think about the issue in broader sense of feeling badly about it or what can be done, but not in terms of personal safety.
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Old 08-11-2019, 01:05 PM
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It is entirely a math problem, my friend. Just as so many things are when you look at them properly.

Death by mass shooting in the US: 1196 killed (2018 data)

So the incidence there becomes: 1196 divided by 327.2 million (2018 US population, US Census)

Incidence of death by mass shooting? 0.0036553%

Or three-one thousandth of a percent.
More are injured than are killed, and just because you survive doesn't mean that you fully recover. I would consider someone injured in a mass shooting to be fairly affected. I would also consider relatives of those injured or killed in a mass shooting to be affected. Maybe it's a stretch to say that the employer of a person who had a relative injured in a mass shooting is affected, but, due to the shooting in Dayton last weekend, I was down an employee most of the week.

As to the others, we are working on smoking deaths, and there's going to be some lag on that. Even though I quit smoking several years ago, it is not unlikely that in 20-30 years, I'll be counted as a smoking related statistic. Would that mean that smoking is still a problem, even if there are no smokers anymore? We kicked smokers out of pretty much all enclosed public spaces, we taxed the hell out of cigarettes, and forced the tobacco companies to pay for anti-tobacco ads.

Whenever I drive, I assume that everyone else on the road is trying to kill me. I take precautions, I drive carefully and defensively. I take active steps to lower the risk to myself and those around me. There are also cops out on the road that I see everyday, and they too are tasked with working towards making the roads safer.

We are focussing on those things, and it is working, both at a society level and at the individual level to decrease your risk of being harmed by them.

Unlike those other dangers, a shooter comes with no warning. Especially in our open carry culture, a shooter can walk right to their target without anyone batting an eye until they start pulling the trigger. There is nothing you can do to lower your chances of being involved in a an active shooting situation, except, as you point out, never leaving the house.

Those other dangers you mention, those are things that we can prepare for, we can work to prevent, and we do work to decrease their effect. For a shooter, there is nothing that can reasonably be done on an individual level to lower your risk of being involved in one, and there is nothing being done on a society level either.
  #42  
Old 08-11-2019, 01:25 PM
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In the US, the CDC reports that 500-600 people are struck by lightning every year. How should we react to that? Never go out or drive in storms? Place lightning rods every thousand yards (though I might argue cell towers are filling this role already!). The incidence of lightning strikes is about half the incidence of death by mass shooting. Should we devote time to preventing it?
We do work to prevent it. We don't let people get into pools if we hear thunder. We tell people not to golf in thunderstorms. We tell people to seek shelter in thunderstorms, and not to shelter under tall trees. We do have lightning rods, though those are to protect property rather than people.

And as you said, the incidence of lightning strikes (not deaths, that's closer to 50) is only half that of mass shooting(deaths, not including injuries), and it is something that we already devote time to preventing.
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The number of deaths in the United States by dog attacks is growing. It's small - about 40-50 each year - the the number of serious injuries (requiring hospitalization) is between 6000-1300 per year - but growing in incidence. I'm not sure anyone knows why. So the incidence of death by dog attack is floating about 1/30 to 1/20 of mass shootings. What should people do? Avoid dogs altogether?
The reasons why have to do with irresponsible owners getting something that they think is just an inanimate toy that will just exist for their pleasure (and hospitalization is up mostly because wounds that used to be treated at home perfectly effectively are now taken to the ER, and for these stats, even a minor laceration is considered serious if you were treated at the hospital). There are things that are done about it, some are mostly ineffective like breed specific dog bans and the like, but also, you can't bring your dog into most establishments, and just neutering your male dog will decrease it chances of attacking someone pretty substantially; training it will be even better. Personally, I would like to see a licensing system where you have to at least sign a statement that you are aware that this is a living creature that you must take care of before you can have one, but I'd advocate for something a bit more explicit and restrictive than just that. But yeah, there are concerns about it, there are steps that are taken to reduce or eliminate it, and as you say, it only causes 1/30th to 1/20th of mass shootings.
  #43  
Old 08-11-2019, 01:55 PM
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This does not really impact my life even though I live in a major metropolitan area. I drive to work daily - over 300 miles per week and know that a traffic accident is more than likely to do me in.
However I was pretty worried several years ago during the rein of the DC sniper when those shootings happened.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/D.C._sniper_attacks
Looking back now I remember how much people were scared = myself included - as at first they were killing people at random and just disappearing.
I remember abstaining from sitting outside and after a couple of victims were shot at gas stations, some gas station owners were putting up blue tarp around the pumps to allay fear.
Also early on a white van was falsely implicated as the sniper's vehicle of choice and we all discovered that white vans were all over the place.
That was one weird time here in Northern Virginia.
I also remember one other thing that occurred for me.
Since the killings were so mysterious I did what I do now which is come on a web forum to try and discuss theories with others how this was unfolding.
I quickly gave up however, as several of these conversations just devolved into huge second amendment arguments which were nasty and completely unproductive.
  #44  
Old 08-11-2019, 03:28 PM
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My earlier post went **poof**

Nope, they are so statically insignificant as to not worry about. However, drunk drivers kill (& injure) a lot more people & I have altered my behavior because of them. I never get in a car on NYE; my rule is party where I sleep. Same with July 4th, limit time in the car as that's an even worse night for DUI's. It doesn't matter if I'm a sober driver, or a responsible passenger; it's the other drunk asshole that'll get you when they run a red light or come over the center line.
  #45  
Old 08-11-2019, 03:34 PM
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The problem with comparing mass shootings with accidents is that mass shootings are deliberate. People will accept astonishingly high rates of accidental death- automobiles are proof of that- but anything initiated by another person sets off panic and outrage. Why this makes a difference I'm not sure, but it does.
  #46  
Old 08-11-2019, 04:39 PM
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They make me hate Republicans even more, with every passing one. And as a member of a racial minority, it's impossible to dissociate the violence from Trump's race-baiting and the rise of the American Nazi movement. It's pretty clear that a race war is what the Right wants, with ethnonationalism being their preferred strategy in times of global uncertainty -- immigrants/refugees, economic disparity, climate crisis, all connected, all answered by genocidal white supremacy. It's always the same cries after every shooting: we need more gun control, more mental health care, less racism, a less toxic vision of masculinity, etc., and it's always the same people, old white Republican men virtue signaling to lost young white boys, who forestall change because it works in their favor. Getting the working class to shoot each other based on skin color and birthplace is a great way to prevent them from working together towards political and economic power.

In the short term, that means I'm considering concealed carry as a last resort. But then chances are good I'd just be randomly shot by law enforcement instead. In the long term, it certainly feels as though a civil war looms ever closer, or another series of concentration camps. First the Indians, then the Japanese, then the Chinese, then the Muslims, then the Mexicans... who's next?

The mass shootings are statistically unlikely to directly harm me, but the ideology they espouse -- ethnonationalism enforced by genocidal capitalism -- has a lot of appeal to the Republicans, and that has absolutely measurable harm. I certainly no longer feel safe in the United States of America, even as a citizen, especially anywhere between the coasts. The shootings are just the vanguard, but the mainstream Right isn't far behind them. Whether by ammunition or by policy, their goals are the same.
I wonder what the breakdown by party and other demographic categories mass shootings is.

For me personally, it changes my thinking somewhat. The lethality of modern weapons is ridiculous.
  #47  
Old 08-11-2019, 04:52 PM
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Not here, mainly because lunatics aren't allowed to obtain the sort of weaponry that should only be seen in the arena of major war zones.
  #48  
Old 08-11-2019, 05:27 PM
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So, if you're not worried, why then is it a part of your decision to carry?
Somewhat like car accidents and seat belts: I'm roughly aware of the statistics, and so I wear a seatbelt on the off chance that I get unlucky that particular day, but I don't "worry" that I might get in a car wreck anytime I drive (at least not in the sense of an action that verb describes), or at least not enough to cause me any noticeable stress, or occupy my conscious thoughts for any significant amount of time.
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Old 08-11-2019, 05:28 PM
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Not here...
Where is "here"?
  #50  
Old 08-11-2019, 06:21 PM
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Mass shootings have made me less likely to want to visit the United States, and more worried about going there.
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