Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-13-2019, 02:39 PM
CastletonSnob is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 221

Northerners who moved south.


Northerners who moved south, what was your experience?
  #2  
Old 09-13-2019, 02:52 PM
markn+ is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: unknown; Speed: exactly 0
Posts: 2,647
I once moved from Palo Alto to Mountain View. That was about 10 miles south. Does that count?

More to the point, are you asking about as specific country? Moving south in Canada means you're moving to warmer climate, while moving south in Australia means you're moving to a colder climate. Or are you referring to cultural differences, which would obviously also depend on the country.
  #3  
Old 09-13-2019, 03:31 PM
Balthisar is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Southeast Michigan, USA
Posts: 11,326
I'm from Michigan, and was stationed about two and half years in Texas. Texas was cold, girls' makeup was different, and people did something called "line dancing." Oh, and I had to join Pizza Hut's drunk club to order a beer with my pizza.
  #4  
Old 09-13-2019, 03:36 PM
QuickSilver is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 19,001
I miss the north. I hate the south. I'm paid well to stay. 'nuff said.
__________________
St. QuickSilver: Patron Saint of Thermometers.

Last edited by QuickSilver; 09-13-2019 at 03:37 PM.
  #5  
Old 09-13-2019, 03:47 PM
bump is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 18,403
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balthisar View Post
I'm from Michigan, and was stationed about two and half years in Texas. Texas was cold, girls' makeup was different, and people did something called "line dancing." Oh, and I had to join Pizza Hut's drunk club to order a beer with my pizza.
Wait... you're from Michigan and Texas was cold? Surely you don't mean in the climate sense....
  #6  
Old 09-13-2019, 03:56 PM
Beckdawrek's Avatar
Beckdawrek is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: So.Ark ?
Posts: 17,719
My Daddy was a Marine, we lived all over. He decamped back to Arkansaa his home state. Ive been here since 9th grade. Married, built a house, raised kids and I'm still newcomer.
The wall is hard to climb over.
  #7  
Old 09-13-2019, 04:08 PM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 11,624
Quote:
Originally Posted by markn+ View Post
I once moved from Palo Alto to Mountain View. That was about 10 miles south. Does that count?

More to the point, are you asking about as specific country? Moving south in Canada means you're moving to warmer climate, while moving south in Australia means you're moving to a colder climate. Or are you referring to cultural differences, which would obviously also depend on the country.
Check the history of threads started by the OP and it will clear things up for you.
  #8  
Old 09-13-2019, 04:21 PM
Author Balk is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 134
My experience is more of a gradual move... First Mountain West, then Louisville (sort of border between North and South), then Nashville, then rural Tennessee.
Good:
Generally more friendly - Southen hospitality. Strangers wave at you when out walking the dog or whatever.
Different:
Accents and different terms ("hose pipe" for garden hose)
Not Good:
Some very poor houses, trailers (can people really live there?)
"Interesting" people at stores. Poor, backwoods, etc. (I have a contest when I go to Walmart to find the most interesting person)
Confederate flags, Gadsden flags (don't tread on me), pickup trucks with lots of large flags in the back - American, Confederate and some I don't want to know what they are.
  #9  
Old 09-13-2019, 05:42 PM
AncientHumanoid's Avatar
AncientHumanoid is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Quantum foam
Posts: 24,514
Quote:
Originally Posted by bump View Post
Wait... you're from Michigan and Texas was cold? Surely you don't mean in the climate sense....
Panhandle maybe?

In Amarillo, a guy I knew described winters as "Ain't nothin between here and the North Pole but a barbed wire fence."
__________________
That is not dead which can eternal lie,
And with strange aeons even death may die.
  #10  
Old 09-13-2019, 05:54 PM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor's Avatar
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 31,099
Wisconsin to Alabama, then Tennessee

Huntsville has the Space & Rocket Center, & lots of Aerospace PhD s.

The rest of the State is Hell on Earth, if you have a brain, & can read.

Tennessee is Poor & Corrupt.

You can get a job in the South, but no money here.
__________________
"When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist."
~~~Dom Helder Camara
  #11  
Old 09-13-2019, 05:55 PM
DrFidelius's Avatar
DrFidelius is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Miskatonic University
Posts: 12,531
Lost my job in Connecticut three years ago, moved to Florida two and a half years ago. Sarasota area. Beautiful beaches, friendly people, can't get a good pizza or bagels but you learn to appreciate a Cuban sandwich or a fish taco.
Making less than half what I did, living expenses are about a third what they were. Bank account is holding more money.
Best decision we've made in thirtysomething years.
__________________
The opinions expressed here are my own, and do not represent any other persons, organizations, spirits, thinking machines, hive minds or other sentient beings on this world or any adjacent dimensions in the multiverse.
  #12  
Old 09-13-2019, 06:48 PM
california jobcase is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: S. GA
Posts: 3,393
Moved to south GA from central IN. I taught high school science. I found time seemed to fly to Christmas because it didn't get cold, but the clock quit running in March since it was warm out and warm out means school's out soon back in Indiana. Getting paid monthly took a bit of getting used to, but I learned how to budget. I originally waned to move back after getting some experience, but that never happened. I'm retired now and remain south most of the time. I get a good break on Georgia income tax (I pay none) and my allergies to cool season grasses and hardwood trees are diminished a good deal here. I really don't do well with cold any more.

Locals don't understand this, but there are ZERO good tomatoes, sweet corn, or apples here in the deep south. Good varieties of sweet corn are finally being grown here, but they pick it too mature. Apples won't grow well here due to not enough cold hours, and tomatoes won't ripen on the vine due to the hot nights. I'm heading for the North Georgia apple orchards tomorrow!
  #13  
Old 09-13-2019, 07:24 PM
Sunny Daze's Avatar
Sunny Daze is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Bay Area Urban Sprawl
Posts: 12,814
Quote:
Originally Posted by AncientHumanoid View Post
Panhandle maybe?

In Amarillo, a guy I knew described winters as "Ain't nothin between here and the North Pole but a barbed wire fence."
My MiL tries this line with me. I'll ask her what the temperature is and she'll say "75" or "70". My eyes cannot roll that hard.

I've actually looked at maps to verify that there are mountains of some sort between Texas and the North Pole, but then I decided I wasn't going to change any minds and gave up.
  #14  
Old 09-13-2019, 08:20 PM
ASL v2.0's Avatar
ASL v2.0 is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Various
Posts: 289
My parents moved from Michigan to Texas when I was five. My sense was there just wasn’t enough snow.
  #15  
Old 09-13-2019, 08:22 PM
Fair Rarity's Avatar
Fair Rarity is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2,199
I liked biscuits everywhere. But while it was nice that people were nice on the outside, I missed cranky old Yankee-ness. And holy fuck was everyone slow as shit. Oh, that light is green? Let me slowly go now. No, a little more slowly. And while everyone in MA drives like a maniac, back before smart phones at least everyone would all start creeping forward when a light turned green. But down south everyone would stay at a full stop until the car in front of them was already moving and gone.

And while I like biscuits, I missed my food and my grocery stores and my brands.
  #16  
Old 09-13-2019, 09:23 PM
CairoCarol is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 4,993
I'm not really from any place in particular (I've moved about 20 zillion times in my life), but from age 11 to 21 I lived in New Hampshire or Massachusetts, and then again for another 4 years from age 29-34. So I consider myself more or less a New Englander.

Following a career spent traipsing around the world, I moved to Hawaii for retirement, so the simple version of my geographic life is: New England-(some stuff)-Hawaii. Does that count as moving from North to South?

In case it does, my experience is swell! True, I miss beautiful, crisp autumn days, roaring fires and hot chocolate in winter, and summer nights that go on forever. But I could always take a vacation to New England if I wanted to experience that again. More importantly, I do NOT miss driving in ice and snow, having hands that ache and a nose that runs from cold half the year, and being unable to garden year-round.

People may not be thinking of Hawaii when they speak of "the South," but it's a southern destination that works for me.

.
__________________
If I waited for memory to serve, I'd starve.

Last edited by CairoCarol; 09-13-2019 at 09:24 PM.
  #17  
Old 09-13-2019, 10:26 PM
P-man is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Washington, DC area
Posts: 1,782
As someone who moved from the south to the north, I'd have a hard time moving back. Although technically I'm south of the Mason-Dixon line in the MD suburbs of DC. I certainly couldn't move to somewhere Ms. P was the only Jewish person in town.
  #18  
Old 09-13-2019, 10:37 PM
CairoCarol is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 4,993
This thread makes me recall the quote, credited to JFK but apparently a quote he got from someone else, about Washington DC: "A city of northern charm and southern efficiency."
__________________
If I waited for memory to serve, I'd starve.
  #19  
Old 09-13-2019, 11:45 PM
Velocity is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 15,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balthisar View Post
I'm from Michigan, and was stationed about two and half years in Texas. Texas was cold
  #20  
Old 09-14-2019, 10:28 AM
Doug K. is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Hutchinson, KS
Posts: 4,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by markn+ View Post
I once moved from Palo Alto to Mountain View. That was about 10 miles south. Does that count?

More to the point, are you asking about as specific country? Moving south in Canada means you're moving to warmer climate, while moving south in Australia means you're moving to a colder climate. Or are you referring to cultural differences, which would obviously also depend on the country.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
Check the history of threads started by the OP and it will clear things up for you.
Also keep in mind that this is a U.S. based board. That's why we're only supposed to post in English and the rule about advocating illegal activities refers to activities that are illegal in the U.S. I think it's safe to assume that any question like this is about the U.S. unless otherwise specified.
  #21  
Old 09-14-2019, 11:32 AM
Beckdawrek's Avatar
Beckdawrek is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: So.Ark ?
Posts: 17,719
Mr.Wrekker moved us to the Upper Peninsula of Mich. for a few years. I had 3 small children. We had a blast up there. The kids experienced snow for Christmas and learned ice skating and rudimentary skiing. I have to say I was happy to get back to Arkansas., though. Because of family, mostly.
  #22  
Old 09-14-2019, 12:47 PM
Skywatcher's Avatar
Skywatcher is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Somewhere in the Potomac
Posts: 35,025
After living just above the 41st parallel and just below the 30th parallel, I split the difference.

Last edited by Skywatcher; 09-14-2019 at 12:48 PM.
  #23  
Old 09-14-2019, 12:52 PM
ZonexandScout's Avatar
ZonexandScout is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 1,643
Born in CT, educated in Boston and Chicago, moved to Raleigh in 1979.

I love it here. Of course, I married into a real southern family (tobacco farming, related to everyone, actual pig pickin's, and so forth), so I got a little bit of an advantage. Even though I'm a Yankee myself, I have to say that my tolerance for new Yankees moving down here is even less than that of the true natives.

As for "no good money jobs," that's a load of crap. In a high-tech industry or have a professional skill? There are good salaries and your money will go a long way.

If you want to feel like you never left New England, buy a house in Cary.
  #24  
Old 09-14-2019, 02:28 PM
LurkMeister is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Central NC
Posts: 4,677
Lived all my life in Chicago until I retired and moved to NC in 2006. It didn't take me long to adjust to life here. I don't miss the colder and snowier winters.

I was reminded today at the farmer's market that Cary stands for "containment area for relocated Yankees".
  #25  
Old 09-14-2019, 02:37 PM
DinoR is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 3,703
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocity View Post
So I grew up just south of the Michigan border. Michigan was where I lived longest as an adult. There's some bits that might surprise you.

One is just the experience of cold when you are outdoors. I spent a winter at Ft Knox which is west of Louisville, KY. It was one of the most miserable winters of my life despite being further south. Back at home the thermometer read colder. The difference was mostly between 25-30ish at home and high 30s in northern Kentucky. At home it snowed. We were getting cold rain out of some of the same fronts. Cold rain soaks in and reduces the insulation value of clothing. It sucked. It sucked a lot. It was harder to stay warm and felt a lot colder regardless of what the thermometer said.

There's also the Great Lakes factor. The Great Lakes hold a little over a fifth of the worlds surface fresh water and 84% of the North America's surface fresh water. That has noticeable effects on the weather patterns near them. They are giant, air temperature moderating, heatsinks. Michigan is smack dab in the middle of the Great Lakes system. The lakes mostly don't ice over. Cold fronts typically warm significantly on the way across the respective Great Lake and pick up a lot of water. That means a lot of water to become snow but temps that aren't as low as before the front hit the lake. Later in the winter, as ice cover increased, temps and snowfall both tend to decline. Fast moving fronts were an exception. They just didn't have much time to transfer heat from the water. Michigan is probably warmer in winter than many might think given it's latitude.

Last edited by DinoR; 09-14-2019 at 02:37 PM.
  #26  
Old 09-14-2019, 03:21 PM
Balthisar is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Southeast Michigan, USA
Posts: 11,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by bump View Post
Wait... you're from Michigan and Texas was cold? Surely you don't mean in the climate sense....
Yeah, in the climate sense. DinoR kind of got most of it. Michigan winters get a lot of snow, but it's very temperate. Centex (Central Texas) in the summer is pretty warm. Nothing like Sonora, but bearable, and dry. But winter is frigid, and the wind makes it more frigid. They don't even use salt when the roads ice, because it's too cold for salt. That rarely happens in Michigan, where we salt liberally.

And also, I was stationed there, implying that I was in the military. In the Army, you tend to spend a lot of time outdoors: physical training, morning formation, motor pool duty, going to the field. You've got to dress for that crap. In Michigan, I'll carry an emergency kit in the car, but in general, I don't wear a coat in winter for daily life, because I'm only outside long enough to get between a car and a building. (I do love winter camping, where clearly this strategy isn't valid.)
  #27  
Old 09-14-2019, 04:08 PM
ftg's Avatar
ftg is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Not the PNW :-(
Posts: 20,279
Lived in the US W, NE and SE. The big cultural divide is W-E, not N-S. The NE and SE have a lot more in common that either wants to admit.

One big difference I noted. As a college prof, the attitudes regarding education, esp. higher education were quite notable. Far more favorable in the NE, not so much in the SE. Teaching a bunch of "elite" students in the SE who are just trying to coast by since they didn't care about actually learning stuff is maddening. (Vs. the NE students who were working hard to get A's in everything. And not just faking it. Actually learning the material.)
  #28  
Old 09-15-2019, 10:30 AM
Blue Blistering Barnacle is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 6,716
My SIL moved from Iowa to Florida. She’s been there for years and likes it a lot.

The biggest thing I recall her commenting on is the “manana” attitude among workers in Florida. They get to things “whenever”.
  #29  
Old 09-15-2019, 06:37 PM
Balthisar is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Southeast Michigan, USA
Posts: 11,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Blistering Barnacle View Post
The biggest thing I recall her commenting on is the “manana” attitude among workers in Florida. They get to things “whenever”.
Ah, yes, the varying definition of "ahorita" in Spanish.
  #30  
Old 09-15-2019, 06:58 PM
Johnny Bravo's Avatar
Johnny Bravo is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: The Swamp
Posts: 7,782
I recently spoke to a northerner who had moved down here to be closer to her daughter. She complained that it's always too cold indoors because everyone has the AC running all the time.
  #31  
Old 09-15-2019, 07:10 PM
beowulff's Avatar
beowulff is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 16,813
Is Arizona "South?" I don't consider it so, but the OP might.
I moved from the East coast (I grew up in Silver Spring, MD, worked for one year on Long Island) to Arizona in '83.
I love it out here - wide, open spaces, our worst traffic is better than the daily commute of most DC residents, inexpensive housing, people are generally friendly, good restaurants, low humidity, beautiful winters, dark skies within a 90 minute drive, lots of beautiful scenery, fitness-oriented attitude.
I miss some of the culture of the DC/NYC corridor (museums, theatre, historical sites), but that's what vacations are for.
  #32  
Old 09-15-2019, 08:19 PM
Baker is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Tottering-on-the-Brink
Posts: 20,425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckdawrek View Post
Mr.Wrekker moved us to the Upper Peninsula of Mich. for a few years. I had 3 small children. We had a blast up there. The kids experienced snow for Christmas and learned ice skating and rudimentary skiing. I have to say I was happy to get back to Arkansas., though. Because of family, mostly.
You were a Yooper? I was in East Lansing, in the lower part of the state, for three years. Liked it there.
__________________
At least my dog loves me.
  #33  
Old 09-15-2019, 09:12 PM
saje is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: SC
Posts: 2,244
We lived in East Lansing for a couple of years. I liked it.

I grew up in CT, went to college in Maine and then stayed there another 6 yrs or so. Went from there to Mi, IN, and then PA. Our first southern move was to Chattanooga, TN (though some people consider IN to be southern is). We spent 10 years there and now live near Columbia, SC.

I am a Yankee at heart, and in some respects I miss New England. I especially miss it around Christmas, because to me Christmas means frosty air, snow, icicles ... real winter. It doesn’t get that cold here until the end of Jan, usually, and by that point I’m ready to be done with cold and wet. We don’t get much (if any) snow here. Winter usually means rain.

I love the warm winters, hate the hot, humid summer. I love the southerners attitude towards bad weather, which is to cancel everything and stay home. I like how friendly people are. Southern hospitality really is a thing.

I don’t like the gun culture, I don’t like how red this state is. I like that there is no deductible for replacement of car windshields. I love unsweetented corn bread and some sweet tea.

I miss New Enngalnd, but not enough to move back permanently..
  #34  
Old 09-15-2019, 09:12 PM
Jackmannii's Avatar
Jackmannii is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: the extreme center
Posts: 32,147
From the Northeast/Midwest/Upper South to Gulf Coast Texas meant better Tex-Mex food, and air that could be cut into chunks in late spring through early fall and stored for keeping the house warm in winter.
  #35  
Old 09-15-2019, 09:40 PM
squeegee's Avatar
squeegee is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Aptos CA
Posts: 8,826
I grew up in Chicago then moved to close to the latitude of Nashville. It's lovely here; mild winters, good paying jobs, nice people. The last 32 years have been awesome, and I'd never move back. San Jose has really worked out for me, I love the South!

Last edited by squeegee; 09-15-2019 at 09:41 PM.
  #36  
Old 09-15-2019, 10:02 PM
Eyebrows 0f Doom is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: NYC
Posts: 6,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Bravo View Post
I recently spoke to a northerner who had moved down here to be closer to her daughter. She complained that it's always too cold indoors because everyone has the AC running all the time.
Not sure why there is confusion with this. It’s hot outside so you dress for the weather, you then go into a place that has the a/c on full blast and you end up freezing because you’re only in a t-shirt and shorts.

It could be 95 degrees out and I need to bring a sweatshirt to some places because they keep the a/c blasting on the coldest setting possible.

Last edited by Eyebrows 0f Doom; 09-15-2019 at 10:04 PM.
  #37  
Old 09-15-2019, 10:17 PM
carrps is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baker View Post
You were a Yooper? I was in East Lansing, in the lower part of the state, for three years. Liked it there.
My regular UPS delivery guy about 10 years ago once mentioned that he was from the Upper Peninsula, and he did a double-take when I said "You're a Yooper!"

I have lots of friends in Michigan.
  #38  
Old 09-16-2019, 03:28 AM
DorkVader's Avatar
DorkVader is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: boise idaho
Posts: 2,738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fair Rarity View Post
I liked biscuits everywhere. But while it was nice that people were nice on the outside, I missed cranky old Yankee-ness. And holy fuck was everyone slow as shit. Oh, that light is green? Let me slowly go now. No, a little more slowly. And while everyone in MA drives like a maniac, back before smart phones at least everyone would all start creeping forward when a light turned green. But down south everyone would stay at a full stop until the car in front of them was already moving and gone.

And while I like biscuits, I missed my food and my grocery stores and my brands.
What part of the south were you in? Your driving eperience is exactly what I experienced while visiting OK City a few years ago. The 9 months spent at Ft. Knox KY and the 3 years at Ft Stewart GA taught me that people in that part of the country drive like their ass is on fire and their trying to out run the heat. Midwesterners are scary bad drivers and everywhere else is "normal"
__________________
"The Wonka will show you the true nature of the chocolate, He is your master now."
Darth Desserticola, Sith Hare
  #39  
Old 09-16-2019, 06:45 AM
FairyChatMom's Avatar
FairyChatMom is offline
I'm nice, dammit!
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Southern Merrylande
Posts: 41,946
I grew up in the Baltimore suburbs, and after being moved around by the Navy for a few years, ended up in Jacksonville, FL. One of the most striking things to me was that some people were still fighting the Civil War! Good grief, people, LET IT GO!!! And I always felt like so-called southern hospitality was shallow and plastic. Maybe that's just me.

We moved back to Merrylande 15 years ago, and we now dread every trek we have to make to visit my inlaws in FL (who, BTW, were originally from Indiana.)
  #40  
Old 09-16-2019, 07:53 AM
Ulfreida is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: pangolandia
Posts: 3,591
Quote:
Originally Posted by squeegee View Post
I grew up in Chicago then moved to close to the latitude of Nashville. It's lovely here; mild winters, good paying jobs, nice people. The last 32 years have been awesome, and I'd never move back. San Jose has really worked out for me, I love the South!
This is the first time I have heard the Bay Area referred to as the South in my life.
  #41  
Old 09-16-2019, 07:56 AM
Ulfreida is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: pangolandia
Posts: 3,591
The three places I have ever felt even slightly at home in the US -- and I've been to around forty states -- is the Pacific Northwest, Wisconsin, and New England. I truly do not find one single likable thing about the South. Not the climate, not the culture, not the nothing. I like it cold and grumpy, thanks.
  #42  
Old 09-16-2019, 08:31 AM
Corry El is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 3,876
Quote:
Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
I grew up in the Baltimore suburbs, and after being moved around by the Navy for a few years, ended up in Jacksonville, FL. One of the most striking things to me was that some people were still fighting the Civil War! Good grief, people, LET IT GO!!! And I always felt like so-called southern hospitality was shallow and plastic. Maybe that's just me.

We moved back to Merrylande 15 years ago, and we now dread every trek we have to make to visit my inlaws in FL (who, BTW, were originally from Indiana.)
That's an interesting take because Baltimore and FL were both the South at one time, but neither as much now. FL is obviously a much bigger place though. The FL north/panhandle are still the South. But southern FL is not the South culturally now any more than Baltimore is IME, maybe less so.

Also continuing to kibbitz, the person who said Southeast and Northeast US have more in common with each other than the West had an unusual experience I think, and/or is perhaps a foreigner. Having lived in East and West, not South but close relatives have lived in 'real' South and Baltimore, that's off base in general IME. When I lived in CA nobody could tell from my speech, or particularly seemed to care, I wasn't from there but from the NE. In the South people can tell I'm a Yankee and they often do care. Not necessarily in a hostile way, but it seems important to many of them and in a way I often find annoying. The real South, places not totally overrun by outsiders, is much more different than NE compared to difference NE to West (or NY v LA, I'm from the former, lived in LA for awhile). Not that LA is exactly like NY, but less of an adjustment by far for a NY'er than say Nashville where a sibling lived for many years and I often visited.

But no experience myself permanently moving to the (real) South, I never would.

Last edited by Corry El; 09-16-2019 at 08:33 AM.
  #43  
Old 09-16-2019, 09:32 AM
bump is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 18,403
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balthisar View Post
Yeah, in the climate sense. DinoR kind of got most of it. Michigan winters get a lot of snow, but it's very temperate. Centex (Central Texas) in the summer is pretty warm. Nothing like Sonora, but bearable, and dry. But winter is frigid, and the wind makes it more frigid. They don't even use salt when the roads ice, because it's too cold for salt. That rarely happens in Michigan, where we salt liberally.

And also, I was stationed there, implying that I was in the military. In the Army, you tend to spend a lot of time outdoors: physical training, morning formation, motor pool duty, going to the field. You've got to dress for that crap. In Michigan, I'll carry an emergency kit in the car, but in general, I don't wear a coat in winter for daily life, because I'm only outside long enough to get between a car and a building. (I do love winter camping, where clearly this strategy isn't valid.)
Huh... I had always assumed we have wimp winters around here.

And you're right- there's a huge difference in how you need to dress for being out for a long time in 40 degree weather vs. how you dress in intermittent exposure to 20 degree weather.
  #44  
Old 09-16-2019, 10:06 AM
Hermitian's Avatar
Hermitian is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 2,565
Quote:
Originally Posted by P-man View Post
As someone who moved from the south to the north, I'd have a hard time moving back. Although technically I'm south of the Mason-Dixon line in the MD suburbs of DC. I certainly couldn't move to somewhere Ms. P was the only Jewish person in town.
MD is definitely not the south. The sweet tea line goes through the middle of Virginia.
  #45  
Old 09-16-2019, 10:17 AM
JohnT's Avatar
JohnT is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 23,523
My family "moved south" from Chicago to Atlanta in 1970 or so, not too long after my mother died. We prospered, had some rough times, prospered again, and never looked back. Even now with all the kids grown, the furthest north my siblings ever decamped was Knoxville, TN.
  #46  
Old 09-16-2019, 10:31 AM
The Stainless Steel Rat's Avatar
The Stainless Steel Rat is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Close to the Saturn V
Posts: 10,978
As Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor mentioned, I moved to the Huntsville, Alabama area for job reasons in 1997. Before that I had lived in Ohio, Indiana, and St. Louis all my life. Was a little leery about the move (grew up in the era of George Wallace and Bull Conner), but bought a house here and probably will be here the rest of my life.

Huntsville isn't really a Southern city, you see; between the US Army (Redstone Arsenal) and NASA (Marshall Space Flight Center), there has been a lot of educated folks moving here for jobs associated with the above or industries associated with the US Army/Space. So my youth soccer teams are Black, White, Hispanic, Indian (subcontinent), Japanese and there are a few Arabs scattered around. Very unlike much of the state.

Don't like the rampart corruption of the government (apparently SOP for decades here) and it';s still in the 90's F in mid-September which isn't that much fun, but I'm satisfied.

Last edited by The Stainless Steel Rat; 09-16-2019 at 10:32 AM.
  #47  
Old 09-16-2019, 10:37 AM
zimaane is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: washington, dc
Posts: 991
I grew up mostly in the Upper Midwest (Iowa/Illinois), and moved to the Raleigh NC area in my twenties. I liked it - mild weather and inexpensive. I eventually moved back north to take a job, but I'd consider retiring in the Southeast. Maybe around Charlotte or Atlanta.
  #48  
Old 09-16-2019, 10:59 AM
Inigo Montoya's Avatar
Inigo Montoya is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: On the level, if inclined
Posts: 16,104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fair Rarity View Post
And holy fuck was everyone slow as shit. Oh, that light is green? Let me slowly go now. No, a little more slowly.
I wasn't going to post because it seems I never miss an opportunity to slag on The Confederacy, but this was exactly how I knew I'd landed in Hell. Army moved me to Hinesville, GA with a whole bunch of buddies, one guy from LA and another from someplace in GA even more rural and backward than Hinesville (I get chills just thinking about it). Through me, both of these guys came to rethink their ideas about Yankees being uptight and prissy--I was pretty laid back and easy going in general. Until they were riding with me in what passed for town: "Jesus F*ing Christ what shade of green are you waiting for!?!?!?! GO already!" Sometimes two cars could get through the same green light, but you'd be a fool to bet on it. I honestly don't know why they go through all the bother of stringing traffic lights when a goddamned stop sign would have the same effect. And just letting the car move forward while idling got me tailgating so badly I still had to brake. If it didn't happen every day, all the time, I'd have sworn the entire state was in cahoots to mess with just me. And not just traffic, the checkout lines at the grocery were no better, same with restaurant service. I can understand a culture that for whatever reason doesn't feel the need to rush, but FFS I can't figure out how can anybody move that slowly without making a considerable effort to be slower than everyone else around them. Is this a bragging right? Where the slowest person in town gets props by making everyone else look like they're in a hurry?
Quote:
Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
And I always felt like so-called southern hospitality was shallow and plastic. Maybe that's just me.
People who call it "Southern Hospitality" just don't know what "Passive Aggressive" is.

Last edited by Inigo Montoya; 09-16-2019 at 11:01 AM.
  #49  
Old 09-16-2019, 11:02 AM
ISiddiqui is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Decatur, Georgia, USA
Posts: 6,722
I grew up on the Jersey shore and moved to Atlanta for law school (Emory) and stayed. I love Atlanta. I love the food (though miss the pizza up in Jersey), the people, the culture (Atlanta is very different than... oh, even 10 miles outside of city limits), even the weather. I really can't imagine moving anywhere else at this point.
  #50  
Old 09-16-2019, 03:44 PM
ftg's Avatar
ftg is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Not the PNW :-(
Posts: 20,279
Quote:
Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
And I always felt like so-called southern hospitality was shallow and plastic. Maybe that's just me.
Not just you. It is indeed completely mythical.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:24 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2019 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017