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Old 10-17-2019, 04:00 PM
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Is a cable-landline a good substitute for a "real" landline?


I still have an old-school landline, from AT&T, just for emergencies and for 911 calls. But I never have emergencies or make calls to 911, so it's strictly an insurance policy. The problem is that AT&T keeps jacking up the price to the point where I'm not sure it's worth it anymore. I already have the cheapest plan they offer.

Comcast, my cable TV and internet provider, will give me a "landline" for much cheaper, but my question is, is this really as good of a backup? If my cable goes out, will the phone still work? The Comcast lady who answered my call claims it will, but I find that hard to believe. And does it really get your location to the 911 center like a "real" landline will? Anyone have any experiences? Thanks!
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Old 10-17-2019, 04:18 PM
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I have the Comcast/Xfinity cable, broadband, and landline package. When we had physical problems with the actual cable coming into our house none of the three services were operational. Whenever there are technical difficulties with one the other two seem to work fine.
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Old 10-17-2019, 04:20 PM
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I don't use Comcast for several reasons, one of which is the remarkably high price after the initial discount expires. I use VoIP.ms and am quite happy with them. Due to the infrequent use, the pay-per-minute plans are great for this situation. A fraction of the cost of a real landline.

My big 3 isuses (YMMV):

1. Costs. Like I said, this is quite a bit cheaper than even Vonage and stuff for the rare call situation.

2. What happens when the cable/power goes out? I have a UPS for the device plus modem/router. If my house power only goes out, we're fine. But usually it's a wider outage and cable goes out, too. In my case I have it set up where if the device is unreachable it rolls over to my cell phone. Handy when going on a trip. Just unplug the thing. I know Comcast made some claims in the past regarding they work all the time via using the old local telephone connection. Not sure what they do currently or in all situations. Be very careful in checking into that.

3. 911. With VoIP.ms you pay a bit more for E911 service (optional) if you want to tie your number to a location.

(BTW: I disconnected the incoming phone line at the box. Made a crossover phone cable and plugged that into my home telephone wiring. All the old junctions work but I only use two since that's probably all the device can drive. One is for the base of a wireless phone system and the other to a classic phone. The latter works even if the house power goes out.)
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Old 10-17-2019, 04:24 PM
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I should add that I’ve never had to rely on the location finder either, but Comcast landlines are popular enough in my area that I probably would have heard about any issues.
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Old 10-17-2019, 04:49 PM
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It is possible to lose voice OR TV for technical reasons (ie, not a physical issue like a broken line). If your internet is down, that, I believe, will take the phone out with it unless it's an issue with the modem itself.

The way I see it, you're about as likely to lose your VOIP service as your POTS, especially if it's just there for emergencies, so you might as well go with the cheaper option, plus you have a cell phone.

Here's what I'd suggest. Find out how much your cable bill will go up if you add voice service to it. Let's say $10/mo. Call AT&T and see if they'll lower your bill. If they can't get it to somewhere in the neighborhood of $10/mo, cancel and switch over to Comcast. You can always go back.
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Old 10-17-2019, 05:01 PM
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Go with a standalone VOIP provider. Vonage is the biggest, but there are many other companies. I have used PhonePower for years without any problem. Use a standalone provider so you don't lose your phone if you switch internet providers. If you go with Comcast, you will have to port your phone number if you switch cable companies. With VOIP, your phone provider is independent of your cable company. A Comcast phone is basically a VOIP phone tied to Comcast and you can plug your phone cord into the Comcast router. With standalone VOIP, they send you a little VOIP device which you plug into your router and you plug your phone into the VOIP box.

The VOIP providers typically have 911 support, so that works pretty much the same as your landline. The important difference is that the phone won't work if the internet is out. However, that's not such a big deal since you likely have cell phones which could work as backup.

One big benefit of a VOIP phone is that you get every imaginable phone feature included--caller id, call waiting, 3-way calling, call forwarding, integrated voicemail (can be disabled), free long distance, limited free international calling, fax-to-email, and so on.

Last edited by filmore; 10-17-2019 at 05:01 PM.
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Old 10-17-2019, 05:02 PM
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A traditional landline doesn't require separate power. The little bit of power used by the phone comes via the connection itself. As long as the phone lines are up you are likely to still be able to use the phone unless a blackout is very widespread.

VOIP is dependent on both the internet connection functioning and having electrical power supplied to your home. That's two points of failure versus one for landlines. There's an important caveat. If you don't have a corded phone at least stashed somewhere to pull out for emergencies you probably still lose the landline when you lose power. Cordless systems typically rely on separate power for the base station.
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Old 10-17-2019, 05:07 PM
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Something else I just thought of. IIRC, telephone companies are required to still allow 911 calls to any phone that's connected to their system, even if it doesn't have an account. If, after you cancel your service, you still have a dial tone, 911 should still work.

If all you really need the phone for is 911, that's probably the cheapest way to get it. Granted, there's not a lot of peace of mind that it'll work when you need it to, but technically it should.
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Old 10-17-2019, 05:14 PM
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A traditional landline doesn't require separate power. The little bit of power used by the phone comes via the connection itself. As long as the phone lines are up you are likely to still be able to use the phone unless a blackout is very widespread.

VOIP is dependent on both the internet connection functioning and having electrical power supplied to your home. That's two points of failure versus one for landlines. There's an important caveat. If you don't have a corded phone at least stashed somewhere to pull out for emergencies you probably still lose the landline when you lose power. Cordless systems typically rely on separate power for the base station.
That's why we all have cell phones, which are not dependent upon separate power.
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Old 10-17-2019, 05:16 PM
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If, after you cancel your service, you still have a dial tone, 911 should still work.


We no longer have a land line. But back when we did, and we cancelled service for moves, etc. we no longer had a dial tone, so no way to even dial 911
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Old 10-17-2019, 05:39 PM
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Why do you need a landline? It's not any more reliable than cellular for all practical purposes. If you are worried about reliability, there are very inexpensive annual prepaid cellular plans. Get one, where the minutes for it will last a year, and have a second phone.

Of course if at least 2 people live in your household who have cell phones, if one person's phone is down you can use the other.

If you are worried about the cellular network going down, consider Google Project Fi. They are a virtual cellular provider where your phone uses TMobile, Sprint, and wifi, whichever is available (with preference for wifi) to carry your call. About 20 bucks a month for the first line.

Just get internet only from Comcast. By far the cheapest. And threaten to cancel every year so you keep paying the introductory rate. (And actually cancel and come back with a Sock account if they refuse)

Last edited by SamuelA; 10-17-2019 at 05:40 PM.
  #12  
Old 10-17-2019, 06:10 PM
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That's why we all have cell phones, which are not dependent upon separate power.
How long does the charge last on your cell phone?
How long do power outages last?
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Old 10-17-2019, 06:21 PM
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How long does the charge last on your cell phone?
How long do power outages last?
You have hours to do something. You can plug your phone into a power bank battery if you have one, they are $20 and can recharge a phone from empty a couple times to full. You should have a car charger, again they are about $20 for a fast one or they give away slow ones. Also most cars now have a USB port.

If you plan to stay in an area without power for a long time you should buy a generator and install the interlock kit and external receptacle to plug it in.
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Old 10-17-2019, 06:30 PM
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You have hours to do something. You can plug your phone into a power bank battery if you have one, they are $20 and can recharge a phone from empty a couple times to full. You should have a car charger, again they are about $20 for a fast one or they give away slow ones. Also most cars now have a USB port.
Rather than get a regular phone power bank, get one of those lithium battery jump starters. They are basically like a really big phone charger that is powerful enough to jump start your car. They have USB ports for charging. Some even come with a cigarette lighter dongle which you could use to power your laptop if it had a car charger cord. You could charge your phone lots times with it if you had a long power outage.
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Old 10-17-2019, 06:37 PM
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That's why we all have cell phones, which are not dependent upon separate power.
They are less dependent on separate power not independent of it. It depends on how charged the cell phone is when power is lost and how long the power's off. Lose power for long enough and cell phones start shutting down. There are other ways to have backup power to keep the cell phone functioning. The main issue is that having power for the cell phone for emergencies becomes an issue that needs more thought without a landline. Switching to VOIP or just getting rid of a home phone entirely leaves a gap in capabilities that used to just be there.
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Old 10-17-2019, 06:51 PM
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That's why we all have cell phones, which are not dependent upon separate power.
I have a landline because I almost never have service in my house on my cellphone. It's a basic TracFone flip phone and I don't know if upgrading to a smart phone would improve this situation, which is why I haven't done so.
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Old 10-17-2019, 07:21 PM
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......Here's what I'd suggest. Find out how much your cable bill will go up if you add voice service to it. Let's say $10/mo. Call AT&T and see if they'll lower your bill. If they can't get it to somewhere in the neighborhood of $10/mo, cancel and switch over to Comcast. You can always go back.
I already did that. My bill would actually go down by a couple of bucks if I add voice service, due to it pushing me into a different bundle. I know that doesn't make any sense, but remember that we're talking about Comcast here.

Thanks for all the great replies, gang. Lots of stuff to think about here.

Last edited by Tim R. Mortiss; 10-17-2019 at 07:21 PM.
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Old 10-17-2019, 07:27 PM
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VOIP is dependent on both the internet connection functioning and having electrical power supplied to your home.
Most VOIP units have a large internal battery that keeps it operating when the power goes out.
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Old 10-17-2019, 07:33 PM
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Just get internet only from Comcast. By far the cheapest. And threaten to cancel every year so you keep paying the introductory rate. (And actually cancel and come back with a Sock account if they refuse)
How does a sock account work with something like a cable service account, where I assume they're doing a credit check on the person requesting service? When they try to run the credit check for your sock account, they're going to find that the "person" does not exist.
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Old 10-17-2019, 07:38 PM
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I already did that. My bill would actually go down by a couple of bucks if I add voice service, due to it pushing me into a different bundle. I know that doesn't make any sense, but remember that we're talking about Comcast here.

Thanks for all the great replies, gang. Lots of stuff to think about here.
That was the case with me as well. I had a VOIP phone/modem with Spectrum for 2 or 3 years just sitting in the box collecting dust. Every time I had to call them for any reason I'd ask about removing it from my account and it was always the same thing, taking it off would make my bill increase.
I finally went into one of the spectrum stores to ask about getting my bill lowered because the most recent hike was huge. When they lowered my bill, I asked about getting rid of the phone and that lowered it even more.

They also told me that in a year or so the price would jump up again and I should call them up, add the phone to get a better deal, then remove it a month later.

Such a waste of time. A la carte can't get here soon enough and with every new streaming provider that shows up, we're hopefully getting closer. I have soooo many channels I have zero interest in, but I have to get so I can have the channels I do like.
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Old 10-17-2019, 08:34 PM
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How does a sock account work with something like a cable service account, where I assume they're doing a credit check on the person requesting service? When they try to run the credit check for your sock account, they're going to find that the "person" does not exist.
For comcast, they don't do this.

As it turns out, they match on the following keys:

email address, credit card number

If the name is the same or the address is the same, you can still create a new account and order service just fine and none of their automated systems will complain about it.

Also it turns out if you just delete your credit card from your old account before entering it in your new account, they won't detect that either.

Also it turns out the physical address doesn't matter, either. You do not normally need anything from the cable company to set up service again once it has already been active for a given house or apartment. You just need to buy a modem and you need a username and password from your new xfinity account so that you can log in with the modem on the captive portal page you get sent to when you first plug in a new modem. So you can give a different physical address from your real address, as long as it's close by (not sure that actually matters), and it still works.

As sock detection goes, it's embarrassing, obviously the volunteer moderators on this message board that probably pulls in under 10k a year in membership fees at most (I wouldn't be surprised if it was under 1000) use far more sophisticated strategies.

Basically comcast already knows you are gonna do this and they are more or less going to allow it. It's a form of price tiering - anyone who is desperate or determined is going to get the lower price for their internet service. Wealthier and/or lazier people pay a higher price because to them the extra $240 or $400 a year or whatever isn't a problem. (or they aren't savvy enough to realize it's a problem,)

Same with cable, cord cutting saves almost everyone money, even if you subscribe to basically all the new services. Cable companies still rake in billions from people too lazy or stubborn to switch.

Last edited by SamuelA; 10-17-2019 at 08:36 PM.
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Old 10-17-2019, 08:43 PM
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OP: I notice you are in Chicago, a place that doesn't have hurricanes--so there is not concern of the cellular towers being blown down. Chicago has all the major carriers. So get a prepaid MVNO for one of the other carriers. See lots of options at:
https://www.bestphoneplans.net/
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Old 10-17-2019, 09:00 PM
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Most VOIP units have a large internal battery that keeps it operating when the power goes out.
Cool, my only experience with it outside a commerical account environment is my parents. I can confirm that their VOIP unit didn't have a battery relatively recently. It still presents the question of whether the normal battery could survive a multi-day outage.
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Old 10-17-2019, 09:04 PM
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A traditional landline doesn't require separate power. The little bit of power used by the phone comes via the connection itself. As long as the phone lines are up you are likely to still be able to use the phone unless a blackout is very widespread.

VOIP is dependent on both the internet connection functioning and having electrical power supplied to your home. That's two points of failure versus one for landlines. There's an important caveat. If you don't have a corded phone at least stashed somewhere to pull out for emergencies you probably still lose the landline when you lose power. Cordless systems typically rely on separate power for the base station.
This. The power to the landline comes from the central office which has emergency generators.
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Old 10-17-2019, 09:07 PM
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OP: I notice you are in Chicago, a place that doesn't have hurricanes
Right, that is something to take into account. After Hurricane Maria hit at home, cell service was spotty, there was no mains electricity for months, no cable for a month after that... but my family home's twisted-pair copper line still fed us a dial tone. OTOH in a major US population center not subject to such events, where you may reliably count on power being restored within the day, it may not make that much of a difference.

Last edited by JRDelirious; 10-17-2019 at 09:07 PM.
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Old 10-17-2019, 09:10 PM
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Cool, my only experience with it outside a commerical account environment is my parents. I can confirm that their VOIP unit didn't have a battery relatively recently. It still presents the question of whether the normal battery could survive a multi-day outage.
https://www.xfinity.com/support/arti...a-new-battery?

Apparently, comcast chargings a gougy $165 for a battery that is claimed to last 24 hours.

So no, with a multi-day outage, voip is not going to work.

But this doesn't mean that paying a monthly fee for a landline phone every month for the rest of your life is the only option. Look at this neat product: https://www.amazon.com/24000mAh-Wate...dp/B07C24XC2L/

An immense battery (in practice, at 24000 mAh, you will be able to charge a phone from flat to full about 5 times) and it can recharge itself with solar! Buy one of these, have an extra phone by keeping your old phone, these are one time costs.
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Old 10-17-2019, 10:02 PM
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Why do you need a landline? It's not any more reliable than cellular for all practical purposes. If you are worried about reliability, there are very inexpensive annual prepaid cellular plans. Get one, where the minutes for it will last a year, and have a second phone.
On the contrary. A few years ago there was a flood in the area I lived that knocked out all power over a large area for a day and a half. Including power for the cellular towers in the area. When the power came back it turned out the towers were all damaged, and it was a good week before they could be repaired. Both of our Internet providers were down for a week as well. The only means of communication we had that didn't require driving somewhere else was landlines, which never went out.
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Old 10-17-2019, 10:05 PM
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We have an easy choice - no choice at all. The local telecom monopoly can't be bypassed except by carrier pigeons. They buried fibre-optic cables under our dirt road to supply TV, DSL, and landline to we foresters. We're out of any cell coverage area. Tall conifers block satellites. We take what we get - and we'd better like it. YMMV.

Our cable landline is our real landline. I haven't yet strung tin-can-and-string phones to the neighbors.
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Old 10-18-2019, 07:44 AM
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Most VOIP units have a large internal battery that keeps it operating when the power goes out.
Not at all my experience. Around here the ISPs have a separate UPS to power their modem/router/VoIP boxes. They turn up at thrift stores and I've picked up a couple for cheap as general purpose 12v backups (with a 12v->5v converter for USB charging).

I bought my own VoIP device. You don't have to use the providers if they are a decent company. So I can change providers anytime (but have to port my number which is often free). If I move I just plug it in to the router at the new place and it will work. (It works better if I change to the nearest provider server.)

Landlines have several big advantages.

We have 4 phones scattered around the house so we are usually near one. No looking for a cell phone. Since 3 of these are wireless we can keep one near if we're expecting a call and aren't near the charging base of any of them. So we can answer a call quickly and simply.

Someone calling the house, but not caring which of us they get, just calls one number. No deciding which cell phone to call. The answering machine helps a lot and isn't used as a voicemail dumping ground like so many cell users.

Note that power/Internet outages are uncommon. (And we have a quite unreliable power company by most people's standards.) So the worry about outages is a secondary concern. The everyday, normal, regular status is that it just works without a significant concern about cell phone batteries, getting a cell signal, etc.

I have no idea why people knock landlines so much.
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Old 10-18-2019, 08:19 AM
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How long does the charge last on your cell phone?
How long do power outages last?
We have an emergency light/radio/charger thing with a crank. You can plug cables in, crank the crank, and charge your devices.
  #31  
Old 10-18-2019, 10:45 AM
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They are less dependent on separate power not independent of it. It depends on how charged the cell phone is when power is lost and how long the power's off. Lose power for long enough and cell phones start shutting down. There are other ways to have backup power to keep the cell phone functioning. The main issue is that having power for the cell phone for emergencies becomes an issue that needs more thought without a landline. Switching to VOIP or just getting rid of a home phone entirely leaves a gap in capabilities that used to just be there.
Now you're talking about redundancies on redundancies. Is the OP concerned about a prolonged natural disaster or just being able to call 911 in case of an emergency on the offhand chance the power or cable is out?
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Old 10-18-2019, 11:15 AM
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I have no idea why people knock landlines so much.
I haven't had one for over 15 years and have never missed it.
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Old 10-18-2019, 11:22 AM
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We have VOIP that I think of as a landline, though it's not telephone twisted pair cable under the ground. It is much more reliable than our old landline was. For some reason our cables kept going bad between the house and the pole, some 850 feet. I don't know how many times the phone company laid new cable. I lost count.

It does go out sometimes. Cell phones don't work well at my house unless you go outside on the relatively high front deck. I did implement femtocell service a few years when it became available, so now cells are perfectly good here, but of course if our cable internet dies, so does that.

It's odd. While the options and feature sets for telephone technology have really exploded since the 60s, my impression is that being able to provide base voice telephony capability with high uptime has actually gotten a bit worse. Other than the occasional car running into a pole, or ice storm, I don't remember phone service coming and going so frequently back then.
  #34  
Old 10-18-2019, 11:32 AM
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Why do you need a landline? It's not any more reliable than cellular for all practical purposes.
Burglar alarms, fire alarms. Don't forget, I'll be jamming cell, gps & wifi while I ransack your home.
  #35  
Old 10-18-2019, 11:50 AM
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I prefer having a landline so that all the phone spam and legit-but-can-wait phone calls come to my house, not to my pocket. I don't need the doctor's appointment reminder when I'm in my car or my insurance agent wanting to set up an appointment with me while I'm in a meeting. Yes I know there's turning off your ringer but how good are we at ignoring these things? Much easier to ignore when the call is going to my house and I'm not home.

That being said...my parents and I have had cable phone service for a while now. Maybe even 10 years. It hasn't been a problem for us service-wise, although I do think about buying the battery backup every so often. That would be the obvious smart thing to do.

It's kind of an annoying expense but way cheaper than it was when I had a regular copper line account, with more features (never had caller ID before cable service, because it was way too expensive).

Also my phone/internet bundle seems to keep my internet costs lower. People keep complaining that their Spectrum bill is going up around here but mine has stayed under $90 for years and years.
  #36  
Old 10-18-2019, 12:53 PM
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Why do you need a landline? It's not any more reliable than cellular for all practical purposes. If you are worried about reliability, there are very inexpensive annual prepaid cellular plans. Get one, where the minutes for it will last a year, and have a second phone.
...

If you are worried about the cellular network going down, consider Google Project Fi. They are a virtual cellular provider where your phone uses TMobile, Sprint, and wifi, whichever is available (with preference for wifi) to carry your call. ....
There are three good reasons for a landline, and it's why I pay Spectrum $9 a month for one. (Paying more than that is too much).

1. 911- they come directly to your address, can save valauable minutes.

2. During a emergency, especially one that doesnt effect you personally but it's close- all the cell towers are down.

3. Sometimes you need a phone number to give out but you dont want calls, like with a shopping card. Or like with my wife- they call her several times a week to cover since she is reliable. But if she is a Disneyland (for example0 she doesnt even wanna get the call.
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Old 10-18-2019, 12:56 PM
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How does a sock account work with something like a cable service account, where I assume they're doing a credit check on the person requesting service? When they try to run the credit check for your sock account, they're going to find that the "person" does not exist.
Yeah, you cant. But your wife could sign up instead or your adult child.
  #38  
Old 10-18-2019, 01:14 PM
jasg is offline
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Originally Posted by jnglmassiv View Post
Burglar alarms, fire alarms.
When my Telco changed to VOIP, my security system could no longer dial out to report to the monitoring service.
  #39  
Old 10-18-2019, 01:20 PM
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Used to have the cable phone option as part of the package. Never used it. Never missed it. We've had the power out which renders the cable useless, and often the old timey landlines too when a tree falls on the wires, but never lost the cell connections. I have a battery powered wireless modem also.
  #40  
Old 10-18-2019, 01:32 PM
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I've been very happy since switching from Verizon to Time Warner Cable for my phone service. I won't say there have never been outages but I will say that they have a service person on it in a day, whereas with the phone company it would usually take over a week.
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  #41  
Old 10-18-2019, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by jnglmassiv View Post
Burglar alarms, fire alarms. Don't forget, I'll be jamming cell, gps & wifi while I ransack your home.
How much did that equipment cost you? I can cut your phone line with a $1 box cutter before ransacking yours.

Traditional phone service is on the way out, bigly. Less than 50% of US homes have any type of landline, and less than half of that are the old copper lines. Pretty soon, the remaining customer base won't be big enough to support the technology.
  #42  
Old 10-18-2019, 02:56 PM
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We have a convention land line used in the same capacity as the OP. It doubles as a fax line for a real fax machine and my computer's print-to-fax device.
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  #43  
Old 10-18-2019, 02:57 PM
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I have had a cable-based landline for at least 15 years and it has been fine. (Incidentally, it allows me and my wife to talk to our kids at the same time.) I would like to address some of the issues raised.

Yes, if our cable goes out, we lose service. But if your telephone line goes out you lose service. And 15 years our telephone line went out and our plain old Bell Canada took 7 days to repair it. Seven fucking days. That's when I switched to cable.

If our power fails, our cable modem has a battery that allows us 8 hours of phone usage (so they claim; all our power failures since then have been less than 3 hours and our phones kept working fine). Of course, the TV cable and internet don't work. At least I don't think the internet works. I should try it since my laptop will work for a couple hours.

YMMV of course, but the service from the cable company has been superb. Bell acts as if they still have a monopoly. Anyone remember that old Jules Pfeiffer cartoon where after a dispute with the phone company the customer is told, "You can always use one of our competitors." Well now they have competitors and are still acting as though they didn't.
  #44  
Old 10-18-2019, 03:57 PM
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Shaw cable gave me a cable-to-telephone terminal box with a small battery in it, saying it would keep the phones going during a power failure. I thought I would be clever and also plugged it into another UPS to extend its run time during a power failure but that turned out to be pointless. I soon learned that when there's a power failure it usually involves the entire small town I am in. Shaw forgot to put battery backups in the pole mounted cable amplifiers so there's no cable phone (or tv or Internet) service in a widespread power failure. Bell has a diesel generator in the central office which keeps their POTS system going. That would be the only thing I like about Bell.

There was a major storm last weekend and the power was/is out for thousands. We learned that 10 hours into the 30 hour outage that the cell towers have less than a day worth of backup power. I don't know if that's diesel or just a pile of batteries.
  #45  
Old 10-18-2019, 04:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Crossbreed View Post
We have a convention land line used in the same capacity as the OP. It doubles as a fax line for a real fax machine and my computer's print-to-fax device.
Wait, what? You still use a fax machine? I haven't faxed anyone anything in about 10 years.
  #46  
Old 10-18-2019, 04:24 PM
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Originally Posted by jnglmassiv View Post
Burglar alarms, fire alarms. Don't forget, I'll be jamming cell, gps & wifi while I ransack your home.
And your not going to cut the telephone line? Amateur!
  #47  
Old 10-18-2019, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by jasg View Post
When my Telco changed to VOIP, my security system could no longer dial out to report to the monitoring service.
Every security system I've seen installed in the last 15 years, has included a cellular dial out. But jnglmassiv has apparently uses a cell blocking device when he breaks into homes.
  #48  
Old 10-18-2019, 04:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Omar Little View Post
Wait, what? You still use a fax machine? I haven't faxed anyone anything in about 10 years.
Cool story, bro!

I fax for my business about once a month. (Using my cable landline)
  #49  
Old 10-18-2019, 05:33 PM
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I fax for my business about once a month. (Using my cable landline)
Care if I ask, who? Who would prefer receiving a fax? With scanning and email, what purpose would you need to fax?
  #50  
Old 10-18-2019, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by ftg View Post
I have no idea why people knock landlines so much.
Landlines are great, I didn't mean to knock them at all. I kept one as long as I could but in the end I just couldn't justify the cost compared to what I got with my internet package.

I fretted for a while about what would I do in case of an emergency. But I don't think it makes much difference. Our power and landlines are on the same poles, so when a tree falls, everything goes down. My cell is actually more reliable in that case, and it's always charged and within reach, and as a backup we have friendly neighbors close by.

But if a good old twisted-pair landline were cheaper than VOIP, I surely would have one.
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