Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-14-2020, 01:21 PM
dtilque is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: My own private Nogero
Posts: 7,656

Universal symbols


Not counting trademarks and those found on computer keyboards, what symbols can reasonably be considered universal? That is, symbols you'd expect an educated person1 from anywhere in the world to recognize.

The only ones I can think of are certain currency symbols (euro, pound, yen (although I believe those are on some computer keyboards)) and some road signs. But I'm not sure how many of the second group can really be considered universal. The Stop sign for sure; Yield and Do Not Enter, very likely; not sure if there's any others. The radioactivity symbol ☢, probably. Any others?



1 We can ignore isolated people like the Sentinelese islanders and those of remote regions of the Amazon, New Guinea, etc.
  #2  
Old 02-14-2020, 01:34 PM
Disheavel is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,654
I would vote the general crossed sticks (X) to deny entry. I have seen that used on remote trails in Turkey and Africa- so there is something universal about "Do not enter" about it. Similarly, I wonder if a generic directional arrow would have some meaning to nearly all people. Projectile hunting tools have been around for a long time after all.
  #3  
Old 02-14-2020, 01:39 PM
Dinsdale is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 19,380
How about the red circle w/ diagonal line across some image to denote prohibition?

And male/female stick figures for segregated washrooms?

The wheelchair image?
__________________
I used to be disgusted.
Now I try to be amused.

Last edited by Dinsdale; 02-14-2020 at 01:41 PM.
  #4  
Old 02-14-2020, 01:44 PM
Procrustus is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Pacific NW.
Posts: 12,989
The Peace Sign.
  #5  
Old 02-14-2020, 02:05 PM
dtilque is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: My own private Nogero
Posts: 7,656
Quote:
Originally Posted by Procrustus View Post
The Peace Sign.
Definitely not. I bet there's Americans (teens and twenty-somethings) that don't recognize that. Also people in lots of other countries.


General point: Something to think about when suggesting answers. Will the symbol be recognized by people everywhere? Malawi, Mongolia, Tuvalu, Bolivia?
  #6  
Old 02-14-2020, 02:14 PM
dtilque is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: My own private Nogero
Posts: 7,656
Just thought of a possibility: the Smiley Face. The only problem is that it doesn't really have any specific meaning, so it's questionable as being a symbol, at least as I'm thinking for this thread. So let's just ignore it.

Another set of symbols to ignore are flags. Should have put this in the OP. Everyone recognizes the US and other countries' flags, so consider them counted.

Last edited by dtilque; 02-14-2020 at 02:18 PM.
  #7  
Old 02-14-2020, 02:20 PM
DPRK is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 4,800
A skull? Obviously anybody would recognize one; what might it mean besides death, though?
  #8  
Old 02-14-2020, 02:21 PM
Velocity is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 16,987
The cross, I think, is almost universally known due to Christianity being so prevalent.

One thing that is not universal is the skull and crossbones to denote poison; it had been discovered by some researchers that children associate it with pirates rather than poison.
  #9  
Old 02-14-2020, 02:23 PM
dtilque is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: My own private Nogero
Posts: 7,656
Quote:
Originally Posted by DPRK View Post
A skull? Obviously anybody would recognize one; what might it mean besides death, though?
There's the skull and crossbones to indicate poison. Is that universal?

ETA: ninja'd

Last edited by dtilque; 02-14-2020 at 02:26 PM.
  #10  
Old 02-14-2020, 02:38 PM
DPRK is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 4,800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocity View Post

One thing that is not universal is the skull and crossbones to denote poison; it had been discovered by some researchers that children associate it with pirates rather than poison.
The pirates are threatening death (if you resist), though, right? A child might not realize that, but an "educated person" would.
  #11  
Old 02-14-2020, 02:56 PM
Telemark's Avatar
Telemark is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Just outside of Titletown
Posts: 23,806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dinsdale View Post
How about the red circle w/ diagonal line across some image to denote prohibition?
Except it doesn't, always. In some European countries they use the red circle without the diagonal line to indicate prohibited. They use a black slash to indicate end of prohibitions. It's similar but not universal.

Last edited by Telemark; 02-14-2020 at 02:59 PM.
  #12  
Old 02-14-2020, 03:09 PM
Dinsdale is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 19,380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
Except it doesn't, always. In some European countries they use the red circle without the diagonal line to indicate prohibited. They use a black slash to indicate end of prohibitions. It's similar but not universal.
Apologies for my confusion, and no desire to be overly pedantic. But:
-Are you saying that some countries use the black backslash (end of prohibition) independent of a red slash (prohibition)? I'm trying to think of an action that is generally understood to be prohibited, such that persons would only need to be informed of when/were it was NOT.
-Are you suggesting the red slash IS universal, but the black backslash is not?
__________________
I used to be disgusted.
Now I try to be amused.
  #13  
Old 02-14-2020, 03:25 PM
Banksiaman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Straya
Posts: 1,280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Procrustus View Post
The Peace Sign.
Even Winston Churchill couldn't get it right - either V'ing for victory or telling you to get stuffed.

I'd suggest something very primal - the yuck face.
  #14  
Old 02-14-2020, 04:39 PM
bob++ is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Worcestershire UK
Posts: 7,058
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disheavel View Post
Similarly, I wonder if a generic directional arrow would have some meaning to nearly all people. Projectile hunting tools have been around for a long time after all.
An arrow pointing left or right might be pretty universal, but an arrow pointing up for straight on not so much.

I used to work for a company that shipped machinery in wooden cases all over the world. The standard sign for "This Way Up" is two arrows pointing up with a bar underneath. We discovered that in parts ob Africa it did not work - in fact it had the opposite effect. To a tribesman like a Zulu, a spear should never be left pointing up as that is a sign of aggression, so their natural inclination was to have them pointing down.
  #15  
Old 02-14-2020, 05:01 PM
Beckdawrek's Avatar
Beckdawrek is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Boonies??
Posts: 22,385
I'm gonna say the short white cross on red( or do I have that reversed?) that means Redcross.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 02-14-2020 at 05:03 PM.
  #16  
Old 02-14-2020, 05:27 PM
The Stafford Cripps is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocity View Post
One thing that is not universal is the skull and crossbones to denote poison; it had been discovered by some researchers that children associate it with pirates rather than poison.
Is that surprising? In Britain it's easy to find 17th or 18th century gravestones with skulls and crossbones on them that indicate mortality. Pirates later used the symbol to indicate a threat. I think, but could be wrong, that the poison meaning only arose after the first two usages went out of fashion.
  #17  
Old 02-14-2020, 05:35 PM
silenus's Avatar
silenus is offline
Isaiah 10:1-3
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 52,211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckdawrek View Post
I'm gonna say the short white cross on red( or do I have that reversed?) that means Redcross.
That means Switzerland.

The red octagon seems to be recognized as a "Stop" sign in most parts of the world. Not all, though.
  #18  
Old 02-14-2020, 05:39 PM
Tim@T-Bonham.net is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 15,280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dinsdale View Post
And male/female stick figures for segregated washrooms?
I don't think so.
The female one is usually shown with a skirt instead of pants. But in desert cultures where men wear long robes and women wear pantaloons, it isn't distinctive. Or even a Scotsman in a kilt.

Also, the female one is often shown with more/longer hair than the male. Is that universal in all cultures?
  #19  
Old 02-14-2020, 05:40 PM
pakputeh is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 17
The word okay, symbolized as OK. I see it in Korean all the time, and am pretty sure almost any educated person around the world understands what it means.
  #20  
Old 02-14-2020, 07:13 PM
Trancephalic's Avatar
Trancephalic is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 1,081
<3
  #21  
Old 02-14-2020, 07:18 PM
Dr. Strangelove's Avatar
Dr. Strangelove is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 8,403
Quote:
Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
In some European countries they use the red circle without the diagonal line to indicate prohibited.
That doesn't sound right. The symbol you describe is the mandatory sign in some places.

According to their map, a blue circle is the modern European symbol, but some places used a red circle with no diagonal historically (and maybe still do in places where the signs haven't been replaced yet). It's definitely not a prohibition sign.
  #22  
Old 02-14-2020, 07:38 PM
dtilque is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: My own private Nogero
Posts: 7,656
Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus View Post
The red octagon seems to be recognized as a "Stop" sign in most parts of the world. Not all, though.
Where is it not used? I understood there were some places where they use some other symbol (older signs, perhaps), but also use the red octagon. Maybe I'm misremembering. At any rate, is it likely that people is such places would not recognize a stop sign just because they aren't on the local roads?

The Red Cross (suggested by Beckdawrek) is definitely one, although she got the colors backwards. I think it would be recognized even in countries where the local organization uses the Red Crescent.
  #23  
Old 02-14-2020, 07:52 PM
Terminus Est's Avatar
Terminus Est is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: The tropics
Posts: 7,871
In this age of SARS and Covid-19, I would hope that the biohazard symbol would be reasonably universal.
  #24  
Old 02-14-2020, 07:54 PM
silenus's Avatar
silenus is offline
Isaiah 10:1-3
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 52,211
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtilque View Post
Where is it not used? I understood there were some places where they use some other symbol (older signs, perhaps), but also use the red octagon. Maybe I'm misremembering. At any rate, is it likely that people is such places would not recognize a stop sign just because they aren't on the local roads?
They probably would. I'm just CYA-ing against the pedants and any blanket declarations of absoluteness.
  #25  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:02 PM
dtilque is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: My own private Nogero
Posts: 7,656
Fair enough, silenus. I'd still like to know what countries do not use the Stop sign.
  #26  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:08 PM
guizot is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: An East Hollywood dingbat
Posts: 9,035
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dinsdale View Post
And male/female stick figures for segregated washrooms?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim@T-Bonham.net View Post
I don't think so.
The female one is usually shown with a skirt instead of pants. But in desert cultures where men wear long robes and women wear pantaloons, it isn't distinctive. Or even a Scotsman in a kilt.

Also, the female one is often shown with more/longer hair than the male. Is that universal in all cultures?
Even so, why should two people figures (however you interpret their sex) necessarily represent rooms?

There's a lot of cultural baggage with that symbol that is taken for granted, and isn't necessarily universal:
  • Having a room in the first place.
  • Having TWO rooms.
  • The assumption that by necessity the two rooms must be segregated by gender . . .

Last edited by guizot; 02-14-2020 at 08:10 PM.
  #27  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:23 PM
Banksiaman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Straya
Posts: 1,280
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtilque View Post
Fair enough, silenus. I'd still like to know what countries do not use the Stop sign.
These ones
  #28  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:35 PM
StarvingButStrong's Avatar
StarvingButStrong is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,914
How about simpler ideas? I think everybody might associate a crescent with 'moon', a circle with rays radiating around it for 'sun', a shape of a water droplet with 'rain' or maybe 'water' in general, some flames with 'fire'.
  #29  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:40 PM
guizot is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: An East Hollywood dingbat
Posts: 9,035
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banksiaman View Post
In Ethiopia the stop sign looks like they're just saying "Hi" to you.
  #30  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:53 PM
Atamasama's Avatar
Atamasama is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 5,417
Quote:
Originally Posted by guizot View Post
In Ethiopia the stop sign looks like they're just saying "Hi" to you.
Warning: You Are Entering a High-Five Zone

This thread reminds me of this from Gary Larson:
https://newbeautifulera.files.wordpr...ary-larsen.png
  #31  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:59 PM
Monty's Avatar
Monty is online now
Straight Dope Science Advisory Board
 
Join Date: Feb 1999
Location: Beijing, China
Posts: 24,219
Here is one of my favorite sites: Symbols.
  #32  
Old 02-15-2020, 03:36 AM
Colophon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Hampshire, England
Posts: 13,684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Strangelove View Post
That doesn't sound right. The symbol you describe is the mandatory sign in some places.

According to their map, a blue circle is the modern European symbol, but some places used a red circle with no diagonal historically (and maybe still do in places where the signs haven't been replaced yet). It's definitely not a prohibition sign.
British road signs use a red circle without a slash to indicate prohibition. Except for the ones that do use a slash. Hey, we're British, we're not consistent about anything.

See this PDF. The "no cycling" sign is a bike in a red circle with no slash, but the "no right turn" sign has the turn symbol in a circle with a slash.
  #33  
Old 02-15-2020, 06:32 AM
Telemark's Avatar
Telemark is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Just outside of Titletown
Posts: 23,806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
The "no cycling" sign is a bike in a red circle with no slash, but the "no right turn" sign has the turn symbol in a circle with a slash.
Thanks, that's exactly the example I was going to use.
  #34  
Old 02-15-2020, 08:46 AM
MrDibble's Avatar
MrDibble is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Cape Town, South Africa &
Posts: 27,589
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob++ View Post
I used to work for a company that shipped machinery in wooden cases all over the world. The standard sign for "This Way Up" is two arrows pointing up with a bar underneath. We discovered that in parts ob Africa it did not work - in fact it had the opposite effect. To a tribesman like a Zulu, a spear should never be left pointing up as that is a sign of aggression, so their natural inclination was to have them pointing down.
Cite for this bullshit? Because that is still the standard sign for Way Up in South Africa, and I've never heard of this being a problem here. Not even for Zulu "tribesmen".

I've also never heard this "spears shouldn't be pointing up" nugget of wisdom, either. Sounds made up.
  #35  
Old 02-15-2020, 10:30 AM
lingyi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by pakputeh View Post
The word okay, symbolized as OK. I see it in Korean all the time, and am pretty sure almost any educated person around the world understands what it means.
Oops...thought the post was about the sign, not the word.

Nope. It's considered offensive in some countries and recently associated with White Power.

TL;DR Don't use it as you don't know how it will be taken.

"While widespread use of the OK gesture has granted it an international connotation of assent, it also bears negative, vulgar, or offensive meanings in many regions of the world.[28] In contrast to Japan's use of the expression to represent coins and wealth, the gesture's "O" shape stands for "zero" meaning "worth nothing" in France and Tunisia.[23][29] In many Mediterranean countries such as Turkey, Tunisia, and Greece, as well as in the Middle East, parts of Germany, and many parts of Latin America, the gesture may be interpreted as a vulgar expression resembling a human anus, referring to sex, either as an insult ("You are an asshole"), or a homophobic reaction to a symbol of homosexuality and the act of sodomy.[11] In Brazil it can be synonymous with giving someone the middle finger.[30][31]

In Kuwait and other parts of the Arab world, this sign represents the evil eye and is used as a curse, sometimes in conjunction with verbal condemnation.[32][33][34]"

"White power symbol

In 2017, users on the message-board site 4chan[40][41][42] aimed to convince the media that the OK gesture was being used as a white power movement symbol.[40][43] According to The Boston Globe, users on 4chan's /pol/ ("Politically Incorrect") board were instructed in February 2017 to "flood Twitter and other social media websites...claiming that the OK hand sign is a symbol of white supremacy," as part of a campaign dubbed "Operation O-KKK".[37]

The association of the gesture with white supremacy derived from the assertion that the three upheld fingers resemble a 'W' and the circle made with the thumb and forefinger resemble the head of a 'P', together standing for "White Power" (when performed with left hand).[44] While some members of the alt-right used the symbol after the launch of the 4chan campaign, it remained ambiguous whether or not it was being used to communicate genuine adherence to white supremacy, or with deliberately ironic motives.[45] According to the Anti-Defamation League (ADL):"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OK_gesture

Last edited by lingyi; 02-15-2020 at 10:33 AM.
  #36  
Old 02-15-2020, 10:41 AM
Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 37,165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banksiaman View Post
Even Winston Churchill couldn't get it right - either V'ing for victory or telling you to get stuffed.
I was thinking this one https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...Peace_sign.svg

Not this one https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...%2C_Russia.jpg
__________________
*I'm experimenting with E, em, and es and emself as pronouns that do not indicate any specific gender nor exclude any specific gender.
  #37  
Old 02-15-2020, 10:58 AM
lingyi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,751
I disagree that monetary symbols are universal as they require a level of literacy and ability to clearly differentiate between similar shapes. At a glance, I often mistake the symbol Korean Won symbol, ₩, for the Japanese , which is also used for the Chinese yuan.

Without context many monetary symbols look like English alphabets. The Euro symbol looks like an E, Pound like an L, Dollar like an S, Centavo like a C and probably many others.

I helped a guy do an inventory of his Korean wife's beauty shop and he insisted on listing everything as "product type - foreign words" despite my telling him what was obviously, to my eyes, Korean, Japanese or Chinese. Point being for those who will ask what my point is, is what is obvious to some, is not obvious to others and therefore not universal.

Last edited by lingyi; 02-15-2020 at 11:02 AM.
  #38  
Old 02-15-2020, 11:00 AM
Thudlow Boink's Avatar
Thudlow Boink is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Lincoln, IL
Posts: 28,680
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtilque View Post
Not counting trademarks and those found on computer keyboards, what symbols can reasonably be considered universal?
How about symbols from mathematics? Even if you exclude those found on computer keyboards (the Hindu-Arabic numerals, the equals sign, etc.), you still have things like π (pi), the infinity symbol, symbols for union and intersection, etc.
  #39  
Old 02-15-2020, 11:02 AM
Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 37,165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
How about symbols from mathematics? Even if you exclude those found on computer keyboards (the Hindu-Arabic numerals, the equals sign, etc.), you still have things like π (pi), the infinity symbol, symbols for union and intersection, etc.
I think some mathematical symbols might be at the level of universal, but it would be ones widely used outside mathematics like "+" and "=" not things like union and intersection.
__________________
*I'm experimenting with E, em, and es and emself as pronouns that do not indicate any specific gender nor exclude any specific gender.
  #40  
Old 02-15-2020, 11:20 AM
lingyi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
I disagree that monetary symbols are universal as they require a level of literacy and ability to clearly differentiate between similar shapes. At a glance, I often mistake the symbol Korean Won symbol, ₩, for the Japanese , which is also used for the Chinese yuan.

Without context many monetary symbols look like English alphabets. The Euro symbol looks like an E, Pound like an L, Dollar like an S, Centavo like a C and probably many others.

I helped a guy do an inventory of his Korean wife's beauty shop and he insisted on listing everything as "product type - foreign words" despite my telling him what was obviously, to my eyes, Korean, Japanese or Chinese. Point being for those who will ask what my point is, is what is obvious to some, is not obvious to others and therefore not universal.
Yes, I know it's difficult to differentiate between Korean, Japanese and Chinese, especially since Korean and Japanese writing is largely derived from Chinese Hanzi. My point is that my contention is that any symbol (which Hanzi originated as) is contextual and requires a common social knowledge and acceptance to be considered universal.

What does + and - mean outside of mathematical equations? If I wrote - - - without a mathematical equation, am I saying dash, dash, dash or Chinese for one, one, one?
  #41  
Old 02-15-2020, 11:38 AM
Thudlow Boink's Avatar
Thudlow Boink is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Lincoln, IL
Posts: 28,680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
I think some mathematical symbols might be at the level of universal, but it would be ones widely used outside mathematics like "+" and "=" not things like union and intersection.
I won't insist on those particular examples.
  #42  
Old 02-15-2020, 11:53 AM
lingyi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,751
Easier to differentiate typewritten, but if I was sloppy in my writing, does this 一 二 十 mean minus equals plus (of course a nonsense equation), minus equals cross or one, two, ten in Chinese or Japanese.

Edit: The little uptick in one and two aren't there in written Chinese and Japanese, with the possible exception of calligraphy.

Last edited by lingyi; 02-15-2020 at 11:56 AM.
  #43  
Old 02-15-2020, 12:00 PM
lingyi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,751
Thinking about it, Arabic numbers MAY be the most universal symbol (in the sense that they represent something abstract), as it's often intermixed with native language text, particularly in markets.
  #44  
Old 02-15-2020, 12:03 PM
Die Capacitrix's Avatar
Die Capacitrix is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 445
The Italian symbol for range looks like the American symbol for division (dash with a dot and above). Rather confusing.

Even though the stop sign might not be always used for stop, it is a ISO/ANSI standard for Danger. The yellow triangle with an exclamation mark means warning.

And there's the yellow triangle with the jagged arrow which means high voltage. There might be places that don't use it, but it is quite universal.

If ANSI and ISO agree, those are the symbols which are practically universal. Of course, they don't always agree, and there are local variants.

A sign including a wheelchair typically indicates accessible areas.

And did you know there's the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals? I first learned about it a few years ago. Switzerland has, for many years, used their own signage. Recently they decided to join the rest of Europe. No rushing such things, of course.
  #45  
Old 02-15-2020, 12:06 PM
harmonicamoon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Yucatan, Mexico
Posts: 3,303
Does (degree symbol) get around much?
  #46  
Old 02-15-2020, 12:06 PM
lingyi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
Easier to differentiate typewritten, but if I was sloppy in my writing, does this 一 二 十 mean minus equals plus (of course a nonsense equation), minus equals cross or one, two, ten in Chinese or Japanese.

Edit: The little uptick in one and two aren't there in written Chinese and Japanese, with the possible exception of calligraphy.
Yes, I know 一 isn't written in the middle like minus and the top stroke of 二 is shorter than the bottom stroke, but I said I was sloppy in my writing!

Last edited by lingyi; 02-15-2020 at 12:06 PM.
  #47  
Old 02-15-2020, 12:59 PM
wolf_meister's Avatar
wolf_meister is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Where the owls say "Whom"
Posts: 5,535
There are the copyright symbols
  #48  
Old 02-15-2020, 01:25 PM
Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 37,165
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf_meister View Post
There are the copyright symbols
Only the first one is a copyright symbol. The other two are trademark symbols.
__________________
*I'm experimenting with E, em, and es and emself as pronouns that do not indicate any specific gender nor exclude any specific gender.
  #49  
Old 02-15-2020, 01:53 PM
lingyi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf_meister View Post
There are the copyright symbols ™
The Chinese knock-off manufacturers don't recognize or acknowledge any of them!

Last edited by lingyi; 02-15-2020 at 01:53 PM.
  #50  
Old 02-15-2020, 01:55 PM
Riemann's Avatar
Riemann is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 8,195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckdawrek View Post
I'm gonna say the short white cross on red( or do I have that reversed?) that means Redcross.
It's hard to imagine anyone making a worse case for something being universal.

Last edited by Riemann; 02-15-2020 at 01:55 PM.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:25 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2019 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017