View Poll Results: How do you feel about your private health insurance?
I have employer provided private insurance – I love it 46 23.35%
I have private insurance I obtained on my own – I love it 3 1.52%
I have employer provided private insurance – It’s OK 86 43.65%
I have private insurance I obtained on my own – It’s OK 15 7.61%
I have employer provided private insurance – It sucks 39 19.80%
I have private insurance I obtained on my own – It sucks 8 4.06%
Voters: 197. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-22-2020, 02:42 AM
Fugazi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Denver
Posts: 1,456

Who loves their private health insurance?


I'm following the election and there's a bunch of talk about "165 million Americans have private insurance and love it and would be mad if you took theirs away". I'm wondering who these people are and what percentage of people with insurance actually love it or would rather have MFA.

This poll isn't for people without insurance, or those already on Medicare. Just those Americans with private health insurance.

I'm in a probably not too common situation in that I have both private insurance and completely covered government provided insurance.

I'm rated at 50% disability by the VA, so get all of my medical care and prescriptions for free. Paid for of course by my and your taxes. When I need to see a doctor I call and make an appointment. All my meds are mail order and free. When I run out of refills I use the automated system and the pharmacy contacts my doctor to get more refills. Once every great while my doctor wants to see me before doing more refills.

I also have private insurance through my employer for my wife and 1 kid who's still under 26. I think it's decent insurance, but I don't really know. I pay around $600 a month for it. I have a $3000 deductible that has to be met before insurance pays anything, but my employer covers the 1st $2000 of that in a Health Reimbursement account. I'd say I usually wind up paying out of pocket, above my premium around $1k to $2k a year.

My healthcare through the VA is the easiest thing ever. Call, make appointment, go. Call, order drugs, receive them. I get all my care from the VA, and would only not use the VA in an emergency.

My wife's and kid's healthcare is expensive, and no where near as easy. Every doctor visit comes with a claim and a bill. The one time my wife had a serious medical issue and was hospitalized for awhile, I was sifting through pages and pages of claims and trying to figure out who all still needed to be paid.

Prescriptions can only be refilled twice before I have to go through the hassle of getting them set up through the mail order pharmacy.

Despite this I know a lot of people have it worse with having to fight to get things covered and get the meds their doctor has ordered.

In short, my private health insurance is big pain in the ass and I hate dealing with it. I dread her having another serious issue that would require hospitalization again.

I would gladly, with a song in my heart, pay the roughly $7000 I'm paying in premiums every year into taxes instead and never have to deal with insurance again.
  #2  
Old 02-22-2020, 03:09 AM
septimus's Avatar
septimus is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: the Land of Smiles
Posts: 21,139
I don't have any health insurance at all, but a close acquaintance did, and when she became very sick they provided thorough care. To list the ailments she suffered from during her final years would seem exaggerated — inoperable cancer was almost the least of her worries. (She did receive much cancer treatment which was stopped only when contraindicated by other ailments). The money expended on her — at no cost to her — must have been huge. (BTW, sick as she was, for reasons beyond our scope here she thought her final several months, kept alive by her health insurance, were especially happy!)

I do NOT approve of the American healthcare system, and would like to see a gradual move toward single-payer. But promulgating Fake Facts — that few Americans like their health insurance — may not be the proper way to get there.
  #3  
Old 02-22-2020, 03:58 AM
Fugazi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Denver
Posts: 1,456
I'm not promulgating anything. I'm asking for people's opinions of their own health insurance. Attempting to find out what people actually think, hence the poll. Maybe 165 million Americans do love their insurance and I'm unique in my dislike of mine.
  #4  
Old 02-22-2020, 04:05 AM
Smapti is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 16,813
My employer-provided health insurance is pretty good, but single-payer would probably be better.
  #5  
Old 02-22-2020, 04:23 AM
Broomstick's Avatar
Broomstick is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 30,059
I voted "OK" because my employer-provided insurance does provide some coverage and by American standards it's not too horrible, but I hate it. (By the standards of actually civilized nations it sucks)

I have been trying to set up everything for an annual physical for three weeks and I'm ready to tear my hair out. I have to contact the doctor and get on his schedule. Instead of the doctor's office doing a blood draw and getting routine tests done I have to be the one to find a lab, make sure it's in system, then get the doc's office to see the test request to the lab (that's the current speed bump), then make sure the lab sends the results to the doc, then make sure the health extortionists insurance company gets the results on time or else my premiums are going to go up to "encourage" me to get a physical.

They are already bombarding me with reminders to lose weight, get a flu shot (hey, guys - allergic, remember?), reduce stress, don't sit at my desk all day (WTF? I stand at a cash register for an 8 hour shift), talk to a nurse on their help line instead of go to a real person in real life, and trumpet "reduce health costs!" which really means "don't cost us money". Oh, and this month they pushing "get your prescriptions our new whatever" - um, I get my inhaler script refilled once a year. That's it. Everything else has been OTC for years. I don't need a "pharmacy manager" yet they're trying to get me to sign up.

There's some sort of complicated bullshit to access my "health savings account" which I'm not clear on, despite being intelligent, college-educated, and having actually worked in the health industry for a time. I think I might use it to buy a new pair of eyeglasses, assuming I can work out how to do that before my next appointment.

Oh, working in the industry - there was so much talk about "protecting" people from "overtreatment" - as if 99.9999% of the population goes to the doctor or a hospital for the fun of it. Nope, it was all about "how do we keep people from costing us money even when they're sick or injured" but Og forbid you actually say that.

My current health insurance is better than nothing. Which is damning with faint praise.
  #6  
Old 02-22-2020, 04:35 AM
Broomstick's Avatar
Broomstick is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 30,059
Meant to add:

Frankly, using the Indiana version of Medicaid was a LOT easier and less hassle. The premiums were set as no more than a low single-digit percentage of our income (I think it was 2.5%) no matter how low that was, we seldom saw co-pays, and according to my-sister-the-doctor the cancer treatment my husband received was in no way inferior to anyone else's.

Then, the day my husband died I was deemed to make too much money as a single person to stay on the program so, congratulations, Broom, your husband died and you yourself lost your health insurance. The only bright spot was that I knew that was coming and had the smarts to contact my employers' HR in time to get on their program... because, yes, if I had NOT known to do that (and no one tells you that, in my experience) then I would have had NO health coverage other than the ER until the next "open enrollment" period late in the year. Even so - I pay more money for less coverage, with a shit-ton of deductibles and co-pays. The government run system was superior in nearly every way, even if still flawed. (I spent a LOT of time on the phone trying to find providers that would take Medicaid - once I found them it was good, though.)

The notion that the US had good health insurance is a goddamned lie and once again I'm seeing the scare-mongering ads and hearing my fellow citizens repeating the memes that "they're taking our health insurance away!". The industry is scared shitless that one day the US is going to wake up to the fact they've been lied to and sold a hollow shell.

Do you hear me, fellow Americans? You've been lied to. Your health insurance is NOT great. In truth, even the best of it sucks. And you're not even getting results as good as other folks' for all your money and frustrations. Our outcomes our poorer despite spending more. The private health care model is a failure. It is past time to replace it with has been proven to work better in literally over a hundred other countries. Why do we continue to be so stupid and cruel?
  #7  
Old 02-22-2020, 04:45 AM
glee is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Obama country
Posts: 15,920

I love Universal Health Care (and Private Health Insurance is OK too.)


I.m not American, so please excuse me posting here.
I do have relevant information.

I live in the UK with Universal Health Care.*
I also had private health care for 18 years (provided cheaply by my last employer.)
So it's perfectly possible to have both (and at less cost than the US system.)

*last year I had bad luck. I first got gallstones and later liver sepsis (potentially fatal.)
The diagnosis included blood tests, several MRIs and several ultrasounds.
The curing involved two trips to hospital - both by ambulance, two operations (one lasted over 3 hours) and me staying in hospital for a total of 2 weeks (recovering.)

Total cost to me: $0. (All prepaid by our taxes.)
__________________
Arnold Winkelried:
'glee, I take my hat off to you.... at first I thought you were kidding with your cite but I looked it up and it was indeed accurate. (Still in awe at the magnificent answer)'
  #8  
Old 02-22-2020, 06:56 AM
kayaker's Avatar
kayaker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Rural Western PA
Posts: 34,299
I hate my health insurance, and do not really use it. It's just there for catastrophic illness.

I'm self employed. I used to like my plan. Then the "affordable" health care thing happened and my premiums skyrocketed while my coverage shrunk. I tried to maintain a positive outlook, some people were being helped, but it's continued to go to shite.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
They are already bombarding me with reminders to lose weight, get a flu shot (hey, guys - allergic, remember?), reduce stress, don't sit at my desk all day
Yeah, I was getting junk mail from my insurer a few times a week, so I stopped opening mail from them. I had my premium payment paid automatically through my bank. It turns out there wee some issues and they tried notifying me, but I tossed the notifications as junk.

After several months, I happened to look at a mailing. When I called them, the person I spoke with said they'd been trying to notify me and I explained that all the crap I got in the mail from them went straight into my burn box.

Healthcare in the US is broken.
  #9  
Old 02-22-2020, 07:13 AM
Chronos's Avatar
Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 87,445
Polls like this really need another option, for "I have no idea how good my insurance is, because I've never needed to use it to any significant degree". Before the ACA, most Americans didn't have insurance at all, but didn't know it. What they instead had was a scam where they paid money until they needed insurance, and then got dropped for some bullshit reason. That's not insurance. But they didn't know that until they got to that point: Before then, all they had to judge their insurance by was trivialities like how friendly the person on the phone was.

It's a lot better now, since the ACA outlawed a lot of the techniques the "insurance" companies used to do this. But it's still not perfect.
  #10  
Old 02-22-2020, 07:16 AM
Manda JO is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Posts: 11,910
I pay over $1000 a month to insure myself, my husband, and son. For that, we have a family deductible of over $5000, so unless we get really, really sick, all my $12k/yr gets me is an annual checkup and access to negotiated rates. We probably spend around 3k in medical expenses over and as above insurance premiums each year.

This is by far our single largest household expense. Mortgage doesn't come close.

I am a public school teacher.

Last edited by Manda JO; 02-22-2020 at 07:17 AM.
  #11  
Old 02-22-2020, 07:28 AM
Smapti is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 16,813
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smapti View Post
My employer-provided health insurance is pretty good, but single-payer would probably be better.
To be more specific, my insurance sounds like it's fantastic compared to what other posters are saying.

I work for an employee-owned grocery store and our contract stipulates that our benefits must be as good as or better than our union competitors. My monthly premium is $30, with a $100/year deductible and a $1000/year out-of-pocket maximum. A visit with my regular doctor costs about $15. Most of my meds are a $5 co-pay or less (except for my daily asthma inhaler and my epi-pen, which are about $40 each per fill-up). When I had to be hospitalized for two days a few years back, it ran me about $600. The billing clerk at my podiatrist was actually surprised to find that my insurance covered custom insoles. I've never had an issue lining up an appointment with a specialist or getting lab work done.

I'd probably still be better off with single-payer, though, because I'd be screwed if I got sick enough that I lost my job.

Last edited by Smapti; 02-22-2020 at 07:33 AM.
  #12  
Old 02-22-2020, 08:48 AM
Pixel_Dent is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 1,166
I pay $350/month for a family of 4 which includes full medical/dental/vision
100% coverage of everything, no co-pays.
We have an on-site, overstaffed, walk-in clinic with a pharmacy at my office which covers most office visit stuff. They apologize profusely if you have to wait 5 minutes to see a doctor.
When I see doctors off site their office staff gets giddy when they see my insurance. The few times I have submitted a claim for an out of network doctor I'm pretty sure they sent me a check for more than I paid.

I'm completely aware that 99.9% of the people in the US don't have coverage like I do and I won't either once I retire. But damn right now I love my private insurance and there's no way I'd do as well with any other system.

Last edited by Pixel_Dent; 02-22-2020 at 08:50 AM.
  #13  
Old 02-22-2020, 09:21 AM
Riemann's Avatar
Riemann is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 8,195
Quote:
Originally Posted by septimus View Post
...But promulgating Fake Facts — that few Americans like their health insurance — may not be the proper way to get there.
But facts that are technically true can be highly misleading. I might say I like being poked in the eye with a stick if I looked around me and saw everyone else being poked in the eye with a sharp knife, and I assumed that was the only alternative.

The great majority of Americans have no idea what it means, in practice, to have universal healthcare that is free at the point of service.

An American might like their health plan because it has a low deductible, and the maximum out-of-pocket is only $5000. But how many Americans realize that these concepts are simply unknown in most countries outside the U.S., that for most people when you get hurt or sick the first thing you think about is not what it will cost you, because you just get the treatment you need and it costs you nothing?

An American might say that they like their insurance because their insurer seems to be fairly easy to deal with, compared to some others. How many Americans have experienced not having to deal with an insurance company at all?

An American might say that they like their insurance because it has a large network. How many Americans realize that the very concept of "in-network" and "out-of-network" does not exist outside the U.S. healthcare system?

An American might say that they like their insurance because they are settled in their job, and have not focused on how restrictive it is that it's tied to their job: that they might lose their "great" insurance if they wanted to change jobs or start their own business?

But above all, consider these two factors:

(1) Many people who say they like their insurance have never had to use it for anything serious, and simply don't know the nightmare of dealing with the U.S. healthcare system in the many situations where it can fuck you.

(2) Many people who say they like it do not understand what it's costing them. When insurance is paid for by an employer, they think it's free or inexpensive to them. It doesn't feel like a huge payroll tax, but it is. People's expectations might be different if their paycheck showed a gross pay figure before health insurance costs, with the amount that their employer is paying for their insurance subtracted.

Last edited by Riemann; 02-22-2020 at 09:22 AM.
  #14  
Old 02-22-2020, 10:27 AM
Tim R. Mortiss's Avatar
Tim R. Mortiss is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Lincoln Park, Chicago
Posts: 7,347
I'm very happy with my employer-sponsored private insurance, and would be sore as hell if some politician tried to take it away from me and replace it with a government-issued product. I don't like being a single-issue voter, but that would be enough to turn me into one.
  #15  
Old 02-22-2020, 10:42 AM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is online now
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 17,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Polls like this really need another option, for "I have no idea how good my insurance is, because I've never needed to use it to any significant degree". Before the ACA, most Americans didn't have insurance at all, but didn't know it. What they instead had was a scam where they paid money until they needed insurance, and then got dropped for some bullshit reason. That's not insurance. But they didn't know that until they got to that point: Before then, all they had to judge their insurance by was trivialities like how friendly the person on the phone was.
This. As someone (I think it may have been Broomstick) said in an earlier thread on the topic, most Americans who have health insurance through their employers are reasonably happy with it, but most Americans really haven't had to stress-test their insurance. They haven't had a serious illness, and they haven't been in a position where their doctor recommends a treatment, and their insurance says, "we won't cover that."
  #16  
Old 02-22-2020, 10:45 AM
silenus's Avatar
silenus is offline
Isaiah 10:1-3
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 52,211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manda JO View Post
I pay over $1000 a month to insure myself, my husband, and son. For that, we have a family deductible of over $5000, so unless we get really, really sick, all my $12k/yr gets me is an annual checkup and access to negotiated rates. We probably spend around 3k in medical expenses over and as above insurance premiums each year.

This is by far our single largest household expense. Mortgage doesn't come close.

I am a public school teacher.

The difference a state makes. My wife and I have excellent health insurance through my district. There are several options we can choose from, and it includes dental, vision and just about anything else you can think of. Don't know our deductible off the top of my head, but it isn't much.

I am a public school teacher.
  #17  
Old 02-22-2020, 10:50 AM
AHunter3's Avatar
AHunter3 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: NY (Manhattan) NY USA
Posts: 21,006
I chose something not factually accurate. Because you don't offer the option of "I don't have any freaking health insurance".

But the last time I did, it fell into "I have private insurance I obtained on my own – It sucks"

I'm in Freelancer's Union, an org that lets freelancers get group rates comparable to employer-based coverage. Premiums were originally in the high 200's then scooted into the 300's and last year was going to go up to around $410 per month. (dropped it; couldn't afford it any more)

There's a deductible. Used to be 10K per year, which I never ever hit, even with knee operations. Under Obamacare requirements / legislation, the deductible amount went down but I didn't end up having any knee operations that year so still didn't hit the deductible.

Not hitting the deductible, in case anyone isn't fully aware, means I was paying my premiums and then would still pay for my medical treatment / prescriptions / office visits / whatever out of pocket.

Aggravations, aside from paying a shitload of money for the privilege of still paying all my medical costs out of pocket included:

•Being sent to a facility to get my broken foot x-rayed only to be told "no, we don't take your health insurance here, go limp to some other facility"

• Being unable to fill prescriptions because they haven't been approved by the insurance company yet, so go home for now, we'll call you if and when they say you can have this

• Getting deluges of arcane bills, some of which seemed redundant, many of which I swore I'd already paid, but unable to tally them and track them -- trying to call in and get clarification ("How is 'anesthesia' different from 'anesthesiology services' and why weren't those combined into a single bill for god's sake?") getting dunning notices and threats of late fees... eventually giving up and just paying, unable to tally up how close I really was to the deductible or determine whether or not the bills were justified or whether I was paying more than once for something, or whether they were charging me the negotiated insurance co rate or hitting me with the unadorned unmodified uninsured-person rates due to having failed to send the correct fucking paperwork to the insurance folks.

•Receiving bills pertinent so some other person with a similar name in a facility linked to a facility I'd been to, because with all the mergers and acquisitions, multiple record-keeping systems got badly merged -- which may not seem relevant to insurance but it's relevant to the lack of single-payer, that I as the care recipient would be getting bombarded with all these bills.



I want it to be like Student Health Services at SUNY / Old Westbury when I was an undergrad student. Walk in, tell them what ails you, they diagnose and treat and prescribe, handing you the pills more often than sending you to some pharmacy. No bills. No copayments. No nothing. No paperwork, just "show me your student ID".

Last edited by AHunter3; 02-22-2020 at 10:51 AM.
  #18  
Old 02-22-2020, 11:04 AM
puzzlegal's Avatar
puzzlegal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 5,606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fugazi View Post
In short, my private health insurance is big pain in the ass and I hate dealing with it. I dread her having another serious issue that would require hospitalization again.

I would gladly, with a song in my heart, pay the roughly $7000 I'm paying in premiums every year into taxes instead and never have to deal with insurance again.
Well, my private health insurance is also a huge PITA. I get these statements of benefits that I can't read, and it's incredibly hard to link actual interactions with medical people/tests to what I get billed. And I work in the insurance industry, and my father was a doctor. I'm pretty fluent in this stuff.

I would be delighted to pay taxes instead of premiums and not have to deal with the insurance.

But I voted "okay" because my actual coverage is decent. Yes, the deductible is large and the paperwork is oppressive. But I can afford the deductible, and they do actually pay for the stuff I need. (or cover it, at least, so if I exceed the deductible they'd pay) and friends who have had serious illnesses in their families have not had unreasonable difficulties getting approval for what their doctor thinks they need done.
  #19  
Old 02-22-2020, 11:07 AM
Voyager's Avatar
Voyager is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Deep Space
Posts: 47,484
I'm not voting since I'm on Medicare, but before I retired I was on very good private insurance. I'm not sure I loved it, but I liked it pretty well. Medicare is even better.
  #20  
Old 02-22-2020, 11:10 AM
puzzlegal's Avatar
puzzlegal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 5,606
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHunter3 View Post
...I want it to be like Student Health Services at SUNY / Old Westbury when I was an undergrad student. Walk in, tell them what ails you, they diagnose and treat and prescribe, handing you the pills more often than sending you to some pharmacy. No bills. No copayments. No nothing. No paperwork, just "show me your student ID".
That part is fine, but at least when I was a student, the actual treatment sucked. My then-future-husband damaged his knee, and instead of diagnosing it or treating it, they put him on crutches. His mom took him to a better doctor over Christmas break, and he ended up with minor surgery that fixed the problem. But he then needed months of rehab because his muscles had wasted away from not walking, at the instruction of student health.

A few years later he had the same problem in the other knee, it was diagnosed promptly, and he basically had to hobble for a couple weeks before he could get the surgery, and was fine except for some little healing surgical wounds the next day. It was really night and day difference in quality of care.

THAT's what people are worried about with government-issued health care.

And by that measure, those of us who have okay coverage from employers have decent coverage. For instance, my mom was successfully treated for myasthenia gravis. I described her situation to a friend who is a neurologist in the UK who says she would almost certainly have died had she lived in the UK.

That being said, there are tons of countries with outcomes as good or better than we have in the US, where the people pay less and deal with a lot less administrative hassle.
  #21  
Old 02-22-2020, 11:16 AM
Caldazar is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 861
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Polls like this really need another option, for "I have no idea how good my insurance is, because I've never needed to use it to any significant degree".
Another +1 to this. We've never had to use our health insurance for anything potentially devastating, so I have no idea how good our insurance is or isn't.

That said, I will say I find our health insurance annoying. There is a lack of consistency as to what is covered, what is not covered, and what is partially covered. I've lost count of the number of times a doctor has recommended some treatment, a family member has followed the doctor's recommendation, and then we get a surprise after the fact that the treatment was only partially covered/not covered. Since none of us have experienced major medical issues to date, the unexpected costs are usually affordable and not a huge deal. But if I were lower on the income scale, I can easily see how such unexpected costs might be more problematic that "annoying".
  #22  
Old 02-22-2020, 11:31 AM
Corry El is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,256
I voted 'private, OK'*. Depends I think what 'mode' you're in. It sucks in terms of what I'd *like* to be paying for the deductible/out of pocket limits I'd *like* to have. But practically I've had no problem with the insurance* paying big stuff when it came up. And while I don't throw up my hands at any better solution to the US healthcare system I believe it's an illusion to believe that the cost problem is as simple as going all taxpayer funded rather than hybrid taxpayer/private like now (something like 1/2 US healthcare funding is already public). Maybe it gets into the general issue 'how exactly should it work?' but will prove IMO *way* more difficult and complicated to lower costs than just me just paying for healthcare purely via taxes.

*on a composite of plans from a couple of companies I've had in recent years via ACA exchange, no subsidy. The company I have this year proved more problematic than the other company last time I had it mainly in terms of less providers taking it. But the price advantage plus it qualifies for HSA deduction (plan with other company no longer qualifies) got too wide this year to refuse it.
  #23  
Old 02-22-2020, 11:34 AM
TheCuse is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 327
I have employer provided. Employer pays 75% and I pay $25%.


Insurance is Blue Cross/Blue Shield. And it’s pretty good. $1000 deductible a year, and $6,000 total out-of-pocket.

Definitely got my money’s worth the beginning of last year when I had a few strokes and spent 10 days in the hospital. And when the hospital bill for almost $6,000 came in, I was going to set up a payment plan. But then two days later the hospital sent me a thing where if I paid $3,000 they would consider it paid in full. So I threw it on my charge card (which I paid off a few months later). And I spent three weeks in a physical therapy place and the only thing I had to pay for was my cable TV.

Had well over $100,000 in bills, and I only had to pay $5,000.

Actually I also have AFLAC disability, and they sent me a check for $1800 for half-pay when I was out of work.

Then back in September I got poison ivy, and my doctor prescribed me as steroid for it. Well—it had a bad interaction with the blood thinners I was on and I ended up in the emergency room due to internal bleeding (I lost two pints). Spent a week in the hospital and they had to do a colonoscopy and other tests (once I was off blood thinners for 5 days). Thankfully everything came back okay and they said it was a freaky fluke.

Never got a bill so I have no idea how much it would have cost me (because my total out-of-pocket and deductibles were already paid earlier in the year).

And—get this. I have AFLAC at work, and I found out that poison ivy is considered an accident (and I have that policy). And a week’s pay for AFLAC disability. So the internal bleeding is supposed to be covered, as well as money for emergency room, hospital rooms for a week, etc. If all goes right, I will be getting a check for around $4 to $5 thousand dollars.
  #24  
Old 02-22-2020, 12:02 PM
Athena is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: da UP, eh
Posts: 13,501
I have insurance through my employer, and it's really good. I'm a Type 1 diabetic, so I use the hell out of my insurance - my basic prescription and supplies would be a little over $2k/month out-of-pocket.

I pay $70/month premium. It's a high-deductible plan, and the deductible is $2500, but my employer pitches in $700/year to my HSA. Once I hit my deductible, the insurance covers 100%. That works out to a max of $2640/year I pay out-of-picket.

In the ~7 years I've had this insurance, they've denied one procedure because it was deemed "experimental." And it was, it was something that only one hospital in the country even did. I'm OK with that.

I work in tech, so my employer competes heavily for talent, and they are overall a place that values their employees. I know that all employer-provided health insurance isn't this good, so I'm pretty damn happy.

I'd still give it all up for a single-payer system. I'm very aware that I'm doing great because I happen to work somewhere that provides good insurance. Mr. Athena will be retiring several years before me, and, financially, I will almost certainly be set to retire before I turn 62. That said, I don't know that I can realistically retire before I hit medicare age, which is 65. Unless something changes drastically with the individual insurance industry and unless I want to pay through the nose for insurance, I don't see myself retiring.

I'm also a bit stuck in my job. That's fine now, I like it. But if that changes, it really sucks to potentially have a new job that doesn't provide the same level of insurance. And what sucks even more is I've dealt with enough insurance companies that I know I wouldn't know just what they will cover before I commit; they won't tell you anything other than "maybe" until you try it out.

I hate our health care system.
  #25  
Old 02-22-2020, 12:48 PM
Yosh99 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 4

You might be underestimating your risk


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss View Post
I'm very happy with my employer-sponsored private insurance, and would be sore as hell if some politician tried to take it away from me and replace it with a government-issued product. I don't like being a single-issue voter, but that would be enough to turn me into one.
I know scores of people, including myself, who thought similarly, but woke up one morning to find their job was eliminated and their health insurance gone. Purchasing your own is very expensive, but at least you would no longer be denied for preexisting conditions because some politicians got that fixed a few years ago.

Having a government insurance option would be an added safety net. Regardless of who becomes the next president there is politically no way people will lose private insurance options, but there may be a chance to have an optional public option.

BTW, I've been on medicare with a supplement for four years now and I never had a corporate sponsored plan as good as the one I have now.
  #26  
Old 02-22-2020, 01:14 PM
leahcim is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 3,736
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caldazar View Post
That said, I will say I find our health insurance annoying. There is a lack of consistency as to what is covered, what is not covered, and what is partially covered. I've lost count of the number of times a doctor has recommended some treatment, a family member has followed the doctor's recommendation, and then we get a surprise after the fact that the treatment was only partially covered/not covered.
More than cost, this lack of certainty is the big pain of the US health insurance system. If each person paid $20000 a year, but knew for 100% certain, that everything was covered, it would still be expensive but I think a lot of people would go for it. (Of course, the same thing for $2000 a year even more people would go for).

As it is, even people with good insurance live under this fear that every time they have a medical issue there's going to be a bunch of follow-up bills in the mail that aren't covered for whatever reason, and that is shitty.
  #27  
Old 02-22-2020, 01:42 PM
Velocity is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 16,986
I have employer-provided health insurance. It is a mix between "OK" and "bad." There is a big deductible that has to be cleared before one even qualifies for this or that. But at least they provide a maximum out-of-pocket ceiling of no more than a few thousand dollars, so I don't have to worry about being bankrupted for life by some million-dollar hospital bill. For a healthy 32-year old man that may be all I can expect or hope for for my insurance to provide.
  #28  
Old 02-22-2020, 01:44 PM
suranyi is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Posts: 7,980
I have employer provided health insurance, and I chose “ok”. My main problem is that it’s so expensive. My employer doesn’t cover any of the cost, so I have to pay for it all myself. That’s over $2000 per month for family coverage. Fortunately pre tax.
__________________
Right now, it’s Girls’ Generation. Tomorrow, it’s Girls’ Generation. Forever, it’s Girls’ Generation!
  #29  
Old 02-22-2020, 02:16 PM
Riemann's Avatar
Riemann is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 8,195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocity View Post
But at least they provide a maximum out-of-pocket ceiling of no more than a few thousand dollars, so I don't have to worry about being bankrupted for life by some million-dollar hospital bill.
You might think so, but check out if your state provides any protection against balance billing for out-of-network care. If you get in a serious accident and are taken for emergency care to an out-of-network hospital (you get in a car accident out of state, for example), under federal law ACA-compliant plans are obliged to pay only some minimal amount. Under federal law, there is nothing to prevent the provider sending you a massive additional bill, and pursuing you hard if you have assets. Some states have addressed this problem, some have addressed it partially, some haven't addressed it at all.

https://www.commonwealthfund.org/blo...alance-billing

One of the shocking risks in the U.S. system that many people who say they "like" their health insurance may be completely unaware of, until it happens.

Last edited by Riemann; 02-22-2020 at 02:17 PM.
  #30  
Old 02-22-2020, 02:28 PM
QuickSilver's Avatar
QuickSilver is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 20,809
I'm an independent consultant (small business). My wife and I are covered by ACA. We have the gold plan so the coverage is excellent but it sure isn't cheap. I'm giving it an OK because it's expensive. But peace of mind and coverage is worth it to us. I look forward to the UHC option, if that ever come to pass.
__________________
St. QuickSilver: Patron Saint of Thermometers.
  #31  
Old 02-22-2020, 02:36 PM
kayaker's Avatar
kayaker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Rural Western PA
Posts: 34,299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caldazar View Post
There is a lack of consistency as to what is covered, what is not covered, and what is partially covered. I've lost count of the number of times a doctor has recommended some treatment, a family member has followed the doctor's recommendation, and then we get a surprise after the fact that the treatment was only partially covered/not covered.
I avoid the surprise by investigating my coverage before accepting a doctor's recommendation. Not covered, I decline. It sucks that I have to be the one on the phone doing the investigatory stuff.

I've mentioned before that after my heart attack diagnosis, the facility I was at wanted to load me into an ambulance and have me transported a few miles to the hospital where my angiogram/stent procedure would be done. The ambulance was running and ready to load me, but I refused transport until I called my insurer.

The ambulance ride in that ambulance wouldn't be covered, and it would have been expensive. But, if I had an ambulance from 45 minutes away (my home area) drive down and transport me the ride would be 100% covered. So that's what I did.

Pretty said state of affairs when a patient has to do heir own research to save money. I was close to just saying "Fuck it, disconnect me, I'm driving".
  #32  
Old 02-22-2020, 02:41 PM
Skypist's Avatar
Skypist is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 609
I voted that I have employer-provided insurance and it sucks. And it does suck, because I have chronic conditions and actually need to use the insurance. I think we must be a pretty "sick" bunch as a whole because my employer has a difficult time every year negotiating plans for us and the deductibles are high. The premium is off the charts, almost as bad as Cobra payments, if you want to insure a spouse and kids. There are a lot of out of pocket costs.

My employer tried to get us some snazzy add-ons to help us with costs because they know how bad it is - such as $10 online doctor visits for minor illnesses.

I don't get how there are these people who just walk around with their head in the clouds, claiming that they love their employer insurance or that everything is just fine. IT IS NOT FINE. It's a struggle for my employer and me and my fellow employees. There's millions of people without any insurance at all out there. If you lose your job, which can happen to most average people at any time, there goes even the crappy plan you "loved."

It's ridiculous.
  #33  
Old 02-22-2020, 03:07 PM
Fugazi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Denver
Posts: 1,456
Thanks everyone for your replies. It's as I suspected and not everyone with private insurance loves it and would be mad if you took it away to give them better insurance. Just going by the poll numbers so far (I know, small sample size) way more than 1/2 of those all ready insured would prefer UHC. Add in the uninsured and I bet you'd have a very solid majority.
  #34  
Old 02-22-2020, 03:13 PM
Fugazi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Denver
Posts: 1,456
Quote:
Originally Posted by puzzlegal View Post

THAT's what people are worried about with government-issued health care.

And by that measure, those of us who have okay coverage from employers have decent coverage. For instance, my mom was successfully treated for myasthenia gravis. I described her situation to a friend who is a neurologist in the UK who says she would almost certainly have died had she lived in the UK.
Medicare for all is not government-issued health care. Very few if anyone is advocating for that. M4A is government taking over INSURANCE.

I've seen quite a few interviews on TV with UK citizens talking about our healthcare system VS theirs. They all think our system is batshit crazy and if you told them their system was being replaced with ours they'd probably punch you in the face.
  #35  
Old 02-22-2020, 04:14 PM
Wesley Clark's Avatar
Wesley Clark is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 23,498
Currently uninsured. Every job (except one) has offered either no insurance or junk, high deductible insurance.

Part of that is my fault, I fucking suck at building a career.

One job did have 'good' insurance. It was $200/month (my share of the costs) for a $500 deductible. But even then I'd be better off with single payer.
__________________
Sometimes I doubt your commitment to sparkle motion
  #36  
Old 02-22-2020, 04:15 PM
Wesley Clark's Avatar
Wesley Clark is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 23,498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fugazi View Post
Thanks everyone for your replies. It's as I suspected and not everyone with private insurance loves it and would be mad if you took it away to give them better insurance. Just going by the poll numbers so far (I know, small sample size) way more than 1/2 of those all ready insured would prefer UHC. Add in the uninsured and I bet you'd have a very solid majority.
SD tends to be a more educated, upper middle class forum than the typical run of the mill forum.

So the % who have good private insurance is possibly higher than you'd get if you interviewed random people on the street.

Not saying there aren't people who are happy with their private insurance because obviously they are. I'm saying being happy with your insurance is probably strongly correlated with having a good job. And the % of people on this board who have that is probably larger than the public at large.
__________________
Sometimes I doubt your commitment to sparkle motion

Last edited by Wesley Clark; 02-22-2020 at 04:17 PM.
  #37  
Old 02-22-2020, 04:17 PM
galen ubal is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Central VIC Australia
Posts: 2,921
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fugazi View Post
Medicare for all is not government-issued health care. Very few if anyone is advocating for that. M4A is government taking over INSURANCE.

I've seen quite a few interviews on TV with UK citizens talking about our healthcare system VS theirs. They all think our system is batshit crazy and if you told them their system was being replaced with ours they'd probably punch you in the face.
I moved from the States to Australia some fifteen years ago. I'm now looking at the accounts above, and shaking my head.
You poor bastards, still in the States....
__________________
Salvator apiae.
  #38  
Old 02-22-2020, 07:13 PM
Northern Piper is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: The snow is back, dammit!
Posts: 30,715
Quote:
Originally Posted by puzzlegal View Post
That part is fine, but at least when I was a student, the actual treatment sucked. My then-future-husband damaged his knee, and instead of diagnosing it or treating it, they put him on crutches. His mom took him to a better doctor over Christmas break, and he ended up with minor surgery that fixed the problem. But he then needed months of rehab because his muscles had wasted away from not walking, at the instruction of student health.

A few years later he had the same problem in the other knee, it was diagnosed promptly, and he basically had to hobble for a couple weeks before he could get the surgery, and was fine except for some little healing surgical wounds the next day. It was really night and day difference in quality of care.

THAT's what people are worried about with government-issued health care..
I’m afraid this criticism misses the point of single-payer UHC. It’s not «government-issued health care». It’s «government paid-for health care». The doctors are independent contractors, not government employees, and run their own clinics. Individuals choose their own doctor, based on factors like convenience and word-of-mouth recommendations, just like choosing an accountant, or a lawyer, or a dentist.

I’m in Canada, where we have single-payer UHC. I chose my doctor years ago based on recommendation from a family member in the health care system who went to that doctor and said he was impressed with him. I’ve been happy with the results.

Now, if I had a doctor that I thought wasn’t providing good care, I would ditch that doctor and clinic and go to a different clinic, same as if I thought my accountant or dentist wasn’t doing a good job.

The government has no role is assigning me a doctor (no such thing as «in-network»), nor in second-guessing the doctor’s décisions about appropriate tests or treatments. Can you say the same about your private health insurance?
__________________
My great-grandparents came through emigrating to a new country.
My grandparents came through the Great War and the Great Depression.
My parents came through the Great Depression and World War II.
We will come through this pandemic. Hang on tight to the ones you love.
  #39  
Old 02-22-2020, 07:24 PM
nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 13,853
I pay about $300 a month for medium-deductible insurance that does cover prescriptions and physician's visits separate from the deductible, and the best thing about it is that once I hit that deductible, over the past 2 1/2 years, it has paid claims with hardly a hiccup.

For that, I am very grateful.
  #40  
Old 02-22-2020, 08:01 PM
galen ubal is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Central VIC Australia
Posts: 2,921
Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
I pay about $300 a month for medium-deductible insurance that does cover prescriptions and physician's visits separate from the deductible, and the best thing about it is that once I hit that deductible, over the past 2 1/2 years, it has paid claims with hardly a hiccup.

For that, I am very grateful.
...and I paid 860AUD for my total Australian federal income tax for the year* - I don't know, offhand, what portion of that goes to Medicare AU, but even if it all went to UHC I'd be making out like a bandit compared to you.
And remember, none of my income is going to paying for private insurance of any sort. One year I worked out what I'd be paying in US tax compared to what I was paying in AU tax - it worked out to 10.6% more than what I'd be paying in the States.
Is your health insurance costing more than 10.6% of your gross income?


*On an income of 22727 AUD.
__________________
Salvator apiae.
  #41  
Old 02-22-2020, 08:14 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is online now
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 17,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by galen ubal View Post
Is your health insurance costing more than 10.6% of your gross income?
I'll note that, if nearwildhaven is getting their health insurance from their employer, that $300 a month is likely a small fraction of the total monthly premium cost for their policy.

While most U.S. employers today do require their employees to pay a share of the premium costs for their health insurance (typically through a payroll deduction), on average, an employee only pays 18% of the premium for a "self only" policy, and 29% of the premium for a "family" policy. While smaller companies tend to require their employees to pay a greater share, even then, they're usually only paying a minority share -- employees at smaller companies (under 200 employees) only pay an average of 38% of the premium cost for a family policy. (Source)

As a result, many (probably most) Americans who get their health insurance from their employers have no idea what the total cost of their coverage actually is.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 02-22-2020 at 08:15 PM.
  #42  
Old 02-22-2020, 08:57 PM
Ravenman is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 27,899
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fugazi View Post
Thanks everyone for your replies. It's as I suspected and not everyone with private insurance loves it and would be mad if you took it away to give them better insurance. Just going by the poll numbers so far (I know, small sample size) way more than 1/2 of those all ready insured would prefer UHC. Add in the uninsured and I bet you'd have a very solid majority.
Respectfully, I think you are drawing the wrong conclusions. Here’s why.

I think there’s a good number of people who separate in their minds the quality of coverage with what insurance they have (how big is the deductible, cost of drugs, etc) with the quality of the system (if you lose your job you are probably shit out of luck).

It is entirely possible to hate the system, but feel their insurance is serving them well, and so would not want to feel like they are being sold a bill of goods on what universal health care will mean for them. (“If you like your plan, you can keep it!”)

It’s also fully possible to see advantages to our health care system, but not be happy with one’s plan. For example, they think that we would have worse doctors if their pay were cut, but their cheap-ass employer keeps cutting back on the quality of the plan offered at work.

In neither case does one’s opinion of their plan necessarily a good indicator of their feelings on single payer health care.

FTR, I voted I have OK health care coverage. I think the benefits are just fine, but the system it operates in is beyond the most convoluted, inefficient, confusing, costly, and terrible system that exists in the world.

Having lived in the UK for a short time, hooooooly cow was that level of service much better than I have today. I think my plan is probably in the gold/platinum range (does ACA still do those ratings?) and the NHS for the times I used it matched the quality of medical care I get today, but in a manner that was like ten thousand times more user friendly.
  #43  
Old 02-22-2020, 09:02 PM
puzzlegal's Avatar
puzzlegal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 5,606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
I’m afraid this criticism misses the point of single-payer UHC. It’s not «government-issued health care». It’s «government paid-for health care». The doctors are independent contractors, not government employees, and run their own clinics. Individuals choose their own doctor, based on factors like convenience and word-of-mouth recommendations, just like choosing an accountant, or a lawyer, or a dentist.

I’m in Canada, where we have single-payer UHC. I chose my doctor years ago based on recommendation from a family member in the health care system who went to that doctor and said he was impressed with him. I’ve been happy with the results.

Now, if I had a doctor that I thought wasn’t providing good care, I would ditch that doctor and clinic and go to a different clinic, same as if I thought my accountant or dentist wasn’t doing a good job.

The government has no role is assigning me a doctor (no such thing as «in-network»), nor in second-guessing the doctor’s décisions about appropriate tests or treatments. Can you say the same about your private health insurance?
I can say that without knowing the details, we don't know what we might get. It's common in the US for insurers to limit which doctors you can use. It's also common for desireable doctors to have long waiting lists, or just not be available. I had a lot of trouble finding a good primary care physician when my prior one retired.

Yes, yes, those are problems now. And yes, our health insurance system is crazy in any number of ways. But those with "good" insurance in the US probably do get better care than they typical UK citizen. We also probably get worse care than the typical Dutch or Swiss citizen, but since we speak different languages that's less obvious.

The Canadians I know all think their system is better than ours. The Americans I know with Canadian relatives all think our system is better than theirs. I suppose we all prefer the devil we know.
  #44  
Old 02-22-2020, 09:14 PM
The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 17,185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenman View Post
It is entirely possible to hate the system, but feel their insurance is serving them well, and so would not want to feel like they are being sold a bill of goods on what universal health care will mean for them. (“If you like your plan, you can keep it!”)
I think I only just now noticed that “Medicare, For All Who Want It” pretty much literally means “If You Like Your Plan, You Can Keep It”.
  #45  
Old 02-22-2020, 10:04 PM
Moriarty's Avatar
Moriarty is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Denver, CO, USA
Posts: 3,319
I don’t understand the concept of “loving” health insurance. That’s like asking if you love the tires on your car.

I don’t love it. Rather, I need it. And as long as it does what it’s supposed to do, it’s fine. But it’s a huge problem if it fails in its role.

And that, in my estimation, is the problem with US health insurance. Sure, it does it’s job for most people, but we have far too many blowouts.

For me, I hate the US system. Ostensibly, I have good insurance through my job. But when My kid needed some diagnostic testing last year, I got hit up for about $2500 in billing which got sent to a bill collector. And now I’m considering a job change, but the issue that will be the deciding factor (once they get back to me) will be the extent of insurance coverage they will be offering - this is asinine! And my wife got into a fight with the dentist’s office after they waffled about whether they take our dental insurance - they tried to charge $250 for our 7 year old’s cleaning even after she called ahead to ensure we are “in network.”

Last edited by Moriarty; 02-22-2020 at 10:08 PM.
  #46  
Old 02-22-2020, 10:15 PM
nelliebly is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Washington
Posts: 2,844
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss View Post
I'm very happy with my employer-sponsored private insurance, and would be sore as hell if some politician tried to take it away from me and replace it with a government-issued product. I don't like being a single-issue voter, but that would be enough to turn me into one.
Ah, yes, the classic conservative "Sucks to be you" mentality. You don't care about what it's doing to other people or the bigger picture, as long as you've got yours, right?

I voted, "I have private insurance, and it sucks" because there was no Medicare option to choose, and before I got on Medicare, I had crappy private insurance. If I were still employed, I would have selected the via-employer-and-it-sucks option, because I was a public school teacher in Wyoming, which opted out of expanding Medicaid out of sheer hatred for Obama.

However, even if I'd had excellent employer insurance, I'd still be for single-payer because I can see beyond my own interests, and I'm not a jerk.
  #47  
Old 02-22-2020, 10:50 PM
Happy Lendervedder's Avatar
Happy Lendervedder is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Michigan
Posts: 15,662
I own a small business, so we've bought off the marketplace since it's been available. Before that I was utilizing Cadillac insurance from my employer (a union). I loved that plan, but it cost my employer $2,100/month (me, nothing).

Currently, my insurance is fine, but not great (a sliver plan). I had hernia surgery last winter, and I'm still paying the part of the bill that my insurance didn't cover. Without my insurance, we'd've been fucked. Basic doctor visits and prescriptions don't cost much at all, if anything. Other than the surgery, I haven't needed much in care. My wife had a pretty big procedure a couple years ago, and we also paid that bill off over the course of six months or so.

All that said, I voted that my insurance is OK. It doesn't suck, but it's not tremendous. As we make more money with our business, we'll be paying more. Unless something changes in the next year or so, we may not be able to afford the silver plans anymore once the subsidy is no longer available to us.

Last edited by Happy Lendervedder; 02-22-2020 at 10:52 PM.
  #48  
Old 02-23-2020, 03:58 AM
Broomstick's Avatar
Broomstick is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 30,059
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
IAs a result, many (probably most) Americans who get their health insurance from their employers have no idea what the total cost of their coverage actually is.
Yep, not until they lose that job and find out how much a COBRA payment is a month they have no real clue.
  #49  
Old 02-23-2020, 04:07 AM
Broomstick's Avatar
Broomstick is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 30,059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss View Post
I'm very happy with my employer-sponsored private insurance, and would be sore as hell if some politician tried to take it away from me and replace it with a government-issued product. I don't like being a single-issue voter, but that would be enough to turn me into one.
I've been on both the Indiana version of Medicaid and now have employer-sponsored insurance.

I actually liked the "government-issued" plan better.

And that's in a Red state run by capitalism-worshipping conservatives.

Now that our anecdotes have cancelled each other out where do we go from here?
  #50  
Old 02-23-2020, 09:21 AM
chela's Avatar
chela is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Hill House Lake Side
Posts: 2,245
self insured through the market place, where we get the prvilege of paying $250 a month for 3 adults. Free colonoscopy, free yearly well exams(mammogram, pelvic exam), free birth control, and negotiated rates for everything else, including mental health visits, chiropractor, physical therapy,and includes a vision plan for the first time - free yearly routine exam and $100 towards frames and lenses. OUr deductible is 12k. We're gonna experience a bump in income this year, so not thrilled to see the bump in premium.

We were self insured before the arrival of the ACA, every year my husbands glaucoma was considered pre existing so no coverage until we were 3 years on the same plan which was a $650 premuim and rising. IF we changed insureres back to square one, with no coverage for preexisting for another 3 years. And my child's mental health coverage would not exist at all - fuck that shit!
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:13 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2019 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017