Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-24-2020, 12:47 PM
Pantastic is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 4,849

Why didn't hot dogs catch on like hamburgers?


I decided to have hot dogs for lunch today, and a thought occured to me: why aren't hot dogs as ubiquitous as hamburgers in the US? Hot dogs are not an unpopular food item by any stretch, but their success pales beside that of hamburgers. The old standard fast food chains are based around burgers, but have only had hot dogs for limited times as an experiment. There are all kinds hamburger restaurants from fast food to high quality to sit down, and most 'ordinary' sit down restaurants have hamburgers on the menu. While there certainly are hot do restaurants, there are nowhere near as many, and they aren't consistently on the menu of sit down restaurants. They both seem about as easy for a restaurant to keep on hand - both use buns, similar condiments, and hot dogs usually have easier toppings, and both are easy to put in a wrapper and eat by hand.

Any theories on why hamburgers are so ubiquitous and hot dogs aren't, or is it just one of those random things?
  #2  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:03 PM
furryman's Avatar
furryman is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Collinwood, Collinsport
Posts: 4,064
WAG: I blame convenience stores, who wants to eat one of those?
More seriously I think there's a wide spread belief that hot dogs are made from either left over substandard meat, or not meat at all.
  #3  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:04 PM
needscoffee is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 7,586
My Brazilian pal said that hot dog places are the big thing all over in Brazil, with mounds of toppings to choose from. He was amazed when I made him a burger; he thought they must be highly complicated to make as they're so rare there.
  #4  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:10 PM
enalzi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 8,562
Well hot dogs are certain ubiquitous in places like NYC and Chicago. Or any ballpark.

But I think it comes down to 2 issues:
1) People in general view hot dogs as low quality meat, whether it's true or not.
2) It's a lot easier to make hot dogs on your own. They literally come precooked.
  #5  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:15 PM
DCnDC's Avatar
DCnDC is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: The Dueling Grounds
Posts: 13,683
I challenge the OP's basic premise. Both burgers and dogs are standard at every single cookout I've ever attended. There are numerous hot dog-based chains all across the country. There's a hot dog cart on just about every street corner downtown in every major city in the country. I'd be willing to bet that dogs far outsell burgers at sports events.

As to why seemingly more restaurants "specialize" in burgers, I'd guess it's because a hamburger is something that is fairly easy to make up a unique recipe in-house and have a "signature" burger that you can only get there, as opposed to hot dogs which almost nobody makes in-house and the vast majority of establishments are just heating up pre-made, precooked sausages and slapping them into a bun.
  #6  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:22 PM
pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 49,379
Yeah, with burgers you’re starting for the most part with raw ingredients, so you don’t have the markup of buying a premade hot dog, and you can customize it more if you need to without needing the sort of expertise and equipment necessary if you were making your own hot dogs.

But, no, hot dog carts are not common around here, health laws, mobile food licenses, and all that. I’m not even sure the last time I saw a real hot dog cart anywhere.

Last edited by pulykamell; 02-24-2020 at 01:25 PM.
  #7  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:22 PM
That Don Guy's Avatar
That Don Guy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 4,939
You may be surprised as to how many "burger places" sell hot dogs as well.

Here's one possibility: not that many people like grilled (as opposed to boiled or steamed) hot dogs, and it would be too much trouble to have both a grill for burgers (and, say, chicken) and some separate way to cook the hot dogs.
Here's another: the presence of hot dog carts, but very few (if any) "burger carts," means that burger restaurants will be more apparent.
  #8  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:29 PM
Velocity is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 16,987
This may be circular logic, but I think it's because hot dogs are viewed as casual/"not-serious" food, whereas burgers are actually viewed as a real meal, especially at places like Red Robin.
  #9  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:36 PM
Pantastic is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 4,849
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
I challenge the OP's basic premise. Both burgers and dogs are standard at every single cookout I've ever attended. There are numerous hot dog-based chains all across the country. There's a hot dog cart on just about every street corner downtown in every major city in the country. I'd be willing to bet that dogs far outsell burgers at sports events.
I've been to plenty of cookouts with neither and a huge number with hamburgers but not hot dogs, breaking out the grill just to cook a few burgers is vastly more common that doing so for just hot dogs or for both in my experience. I certainly didn't say that there were zero hot dog chains, but the number you're calling 'numerous' pales in comparison to the number of hamburger chains, and even further if you compare 'chains that have hamburgers' with 'chains that have hot dogs'. And what about chains that specialize in neither? If I go to a bar that cooks food, I'm going to be really surprised if they don't have hamburgers on the menu, but hot dogs are pretty rare. If I go to a diner, same thing. And again if I go to a general 'american food' sit down restaurant. Even for non-American cuisines, 'hamburger' is the default 'lets put something on the menu for that white-bread relative who didn't really want to come here' item. Those hot dog carts are generally sharing the street with restaurants that serve hamburgers (and are nowhere near 'every street corner'), and sporting events are a one-off exception.

If I'm driving along the interstate and want to stop for food, finding a hamburger is pretty much automatic, but I'd have to look for a hot dog place and while they're not rare, it's certainly possible that there wouldn't be conveniently on my route. And there are generally going to be half a dozen or more options for hamburgers to every option for hot dogs. If I am at a bar or brewery and decide to order from their cooked food menu, odds are there is a hamburger on there, but rarely is there a hot dog.
  #10  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:40 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is online now
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 17,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by That Don Guy View Post
You may be surprised as to how many "burger places" sell hot dogs as well.
If one looks at the top 10 US burger chains, as far as I can tell, only Sonic, Five Guys, Hardees, and Carl's Jr. offer hot dogs -- the latter two are effectively the same chain, and they have, it appears, only one hot dog (a chili dog) on their menu.

Smaller chains and local burger places -- yes, that may well be a different story. As you note, one generally cooks a hot dog differently than a burger, and the big burger chains may well not want to have the extra equipment just for hot dogs.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 02-24-2020 at 01:42 PM.
  #11  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:40 PM
Airbeck is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Chicago - South Side
Posts: 3,244
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
But, no, hot dog carts are not common around here, health laws, mobile food licenses, and all that. Iím not even sure the last time I saw a real hot dog cart anywhere.
I also am a SW side of Chicago resident, of my whole life actually, and I do see hotdog carts sometimes. Not just at random corners, no, but both Fat Tommy's and Fat Johnny's have carts that can be hired for parties/events. Although I think Fat Johnny (senior) just passed, so they may have retired that. I've also seen hot dog carts at Kennedy and Beverly parks during little league and softball season. So they exist, but not just randomly rolling down the sidewalk or anything like that.
__________________
"Sometimes I think that the surest sign of intelligent life in the Universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." - Calvin and Hobbes
  #12  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:41 PM
Snarky_Kong is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,551
Quick google search gives 50B and 20B as the number sold for burgers and hotdogs, respectively.

For me personally, it's because I enjoy a burger a hell of a lot more than a hotdog.
  #13  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:42 PM
Lamoral's Avatar
Lamoral is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Fenario
Posts: 3,300
The shape of the hot dog and its bun may have something to do with this. Burgers are relatively flat. You put the bottom bun down, you put the flat burger on it and it sits on top of it securely. You put the lettuce, tomato, and other toppings on it; they sit on it relatively easily; then you put the top bun on it and it holds everything in place.

Hot dogs are long, narrow, and encapsulated by the bun on the sides, not the top and bottom. You put the hot dog in the bun. Then you pile all the toppings on it. The hot dog is rounded, not flat; things do NOT sit easily on top of it, especially not a bunch of slippery little diced toppings. They fall down along the sides. You put the sauce on it, the sauce drips down the sides, most likely getting on the sides of the bun as well. There is no bun on TOP of the hot dog to enclose everything, the way there is on a hamburger. You put the hot dog in a little paper box; every time you remove the hot dog from its box, more shit spills off the top of it and makes a mess.

Burgers are just less of a hassle to eat.
  #14  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:50 PM
Crafter_Man's Avatar
Crafter_Man is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Ohio
Posts: 11,654
Hot dogs don't appeal to folks who do not like the taste or texture of processed meat. (They taste like tubular bologna to me.) Hamburgers, on the other hand, are simply ground beef, with little or no additional processing.
  #15  
Old 02-24-2020, 01:53 PM
Ukulele Ike is offline
Charter Member
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 18,469
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
But, no, hot dog carts are not common around here, health laws, mobile food licenses, and all that. Iím not even sure the last time I saw a real hot dog cart anywhere.
Hot dog joints are so ubiquitous in Chicago you donít NEED hot dog carts. And in Chicago I would take a Chicago fully-dressed hot dog over most hamburgers.
__________________
Uke
  #16  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:00 PM
Airbeck is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Chicago - South Side
Posts: 3,244
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Hot dog joints are so ubiquitous in Chicago you donít NEED hot dog carts. And in Chicago I would take a Chicago fully-dressed hot dog over most hamburgers.
That's true also. Where I live I can think of 6 places within a 5 minute drive to get hot dogs. I guess Chicago is a bit of an outlier perhaps.
__________________
"Sometimes I think that the surest sign of intelligent life in the Universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." - Calvin and Hobbes
  #17  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:01 PM
Jeff Lichtman's Avatar
Jeff Lichtman is offline
Head Cheese
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: El Cerrito, CA
Posts: 4,492
There are places and situations where hot dogs are more popular than hamburgers. Sporting events, for instance. A lot of it has to do with convenience: it's easier to eat a hot dog while watching a ballgame. Street vendors are another example. It's a lot easier to cook a hot dog than a hamburger from a push cart.

It is true that many more fast food chains have hamburgers as their main attraction. One reason may be that people like fries with their hamburgers. Fries are a big moneymaker for fast food joints, and most people seem not to like them with hot dogs. People will eat chips with hot dogs, but packaged chips probably don't have the profit margin of French fries.
__________________
'Tis a pity that I have no gravy to put upon Uncle Hymie.
  #18  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:05 PM
Pantastic is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 4,849
Quote:
Originally Posted by That Don Guy View Post
You may be surprised as to how many "burger places" sell hot dogs as well.
I just searched on Yelp for 'hamburger' in Chicago, IL (which is a very hot-dog leaning area), and of the top ten hits, only three had hot dogs on the menu. Locally, out of the last ten places that I've eaten at that have a burger on the menu, the only one that has a hot dog was the one I sought out specifically because I knew they served hot dogs. Out of the big fast food chains, none of McDonald's, Burger King, Hardee's, or Wendy's (the ones I think of) have a hot dog on their standard menu. I don't find those results surprising at all, and I don't really think that scoring 3/10 in a place that is known for hot dogs is that many.

Quote:
Here's one possibility: not that many people like grilled (as opposed to boiled or steamed) hot dogs, and it would be too much trouble to have both a grill for burgers (and, say, chicken) and some separate way to cook the hot dogs.
I don't buy that not that many people like grilled hot dogs, as they're a bog-standard thing to have at cookouts. I'm pretty sure that a high portion of hot dogs sold are grilled, and certainly a major portion of 'cooked at home', and most restaurant dogs that I've encountered are cooked on a grill or flat fryer.
  #19  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:06 PM
Elmer J. Fudd is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Posts: 1,614
Same reason you don’t go out to eat Spam, canned beans, or hamburger helper. Hot dogs are a processed food. People don’t go to sit down restaurants to eat processed food.
__________________
Elmer J. Fudd,
Millionaire.
I own a mansion and a yacht.
  #20  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:11 PM
jerez is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 848
Hamburgers saw an uptick in credibility at some point in recent history, and that hasn’t happened to hot dogs (yet). It’s also worth considering that, of the few common varieties of both, hamburgers might combine with other ingredientes (basically bacon and cheese) in ways that are more appealing to most people. I think a good Chicago style dog is a work of art but maybe it’s not for everyone. Wieners definitely have an ick factor for a lot of people (ETA: as indicated above)

Last edited by jerez; 02-24-2020 at 02:11 PM.
  #21  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:11 PM
puzzlegal's Avatar
puzzlegal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 5,606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pantastic View Post
I've been to plenty of cookouts with neither and a huge number with hamburgers but not hot dogs, breaking out the grill just to cook a few burgers is vastly more common that doing so for just hot dogs or for both in my experience...
Huh. Not my experience. I've been to outdoor meals that served neither burgers nor dogs, but I can't recall ever being at a cookout with burgers that didn't have some sort of grilled sausage (usually including plain hot dogs) as an option.
  #22  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:13 PM
Pantastic is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 4,849
Quote:
Originally Posted by Airbeck View Post
That's true also. Where I live I can think of 6 places within a 5 minute drive to get hot dogs. I guess Chicago is a bit of an outlier perhaps.
I can think of at least six places within a 10 minute drive of me (5 minutes is too short of a distance to really get a good sample) to get hot dogs, but there are at least four dozen places that serve hamburgers in the same circle, and I'm probably underestimating that number.
  #23  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:18 PM
puzzlegal's Avatar
puzzlegal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 5,606
I will say, though, that if I go to a generic sort of restaurant, like a hotel bar, or a diner, I expect there to be a burger on the menu. Hot dogs are less common. Not rare, but not ubiquitous like hamburgers.
  #24  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:21 PM
jerez is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 848
Plus, you can put ketchup on a hamburger.
  #25  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:28 PM
Ashtura is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 2,810
I'm as big a carnivore as they come, and even I have to think about baseball to avoid thinking about how they're made and getting a little sick. I can only eat the all-beef ones too.
  #26  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:28 PM
Johnny L.A. is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: NoWA
Posts: 62,618
Quote:
Originally Posted by enalzi View Post
1) People in general view hot dogs as low quality meat, whether it's true or not.
Some hot dog makers answer to a higher authority.
  #27  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:29 PM
RealityChuck's Avatar
RealityChuck is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Schenectady, NY, USA
Posts: 43,416
The issue is that fast food places were all hamburger places. McDonald's did not sell hot dogs, nor did any other chain. There were hot dog stands, but they were not marketed or franchised until after McDonald's, Burger King, Wendy's, and many other burger places caught on.

People got used to getting a burger for fast food. Hot dogs remained a niche restaurant with no national chains.
__________________
"If a person saying he was something was all there was to it, this country'd be full of rich men and good-looking women. Too bad it isn't that easy.... In short, when someone else says you're a writer, that's when you're a writer... not before."
Purveyor of fine science fiction since 1982.
  #28  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:30 PM
WildaBeast's Avatar
WildaBeast is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Folsom, CA
Posts: 1,202
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerez View Post
Plus, you can put ketchup on a hamburger.
Not at Louis' Lunch, which claims to be the restaurant that invented the American hamburger (although there are other who also make that claim).

Last edited by WildaBeast; 02-24-2020 at 02:32 PM.
  #29  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:34 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is online now
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 17,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by enalzi View Post
1) People in general view hot dogs as low quality meat, whether it's true or not.
My hot dog story:

When I was in business school, at the University of Wisconsin, taking a market research class, we had a guest lecturer: the director of market research at Oscar Mayer (which, at that time, was based in Madison).

He took us through all sorts of research techniques that they used, and we got to see the original concepts for Lunchables, which had just been introduced. At the end of his lecture, he asked if there were any questions. My friend asked, "So, what do you really put in the hot dogs?"

His answer was, I swear: "Oh, good stuff...stuff you'd eat...meat."

  #30  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:36 PM
ZipperJJ's Avatar
ZipperJJ is offline
Just Lovely and Delicious
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 25,854
Quote:
Originally Posted by needscoffee View Post
My Brazilian pal said that hot dog places are the big thing all over in Brazil, with mounds of toppings to choose from. He was amazed when I made him a burger; he thought they must be highly complicated to make as they're so rare there.
That's interesting since beef is such a big thing in Brazil (according to a quick search they are the world's leading exporter of beef). I wonder if it's frowned upon to turn their delicious meats into ground beef?
  #31  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:36 PM
wolfpup's Avatar
wolfpup is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 11,537
I would posit a couple of reasons. The perception that hot dogs are lower quality, highly processed meat is mostly true, even though of course crappy burgers exist. Many common brands of hot dogs make me feel vaguely ill, and there are only a few premium brands that I trust. The contents of a lot of hot dogs are in the category of "you don't want to know"!

But I think a much bigger reason -- and some have already alluded to it -- is that the basic size and shape of a burger -- especially one of the larger ones -- allows a wide variety of toppings, sometimes quite elaborate ones. You rarely hear about "gourmet hot dogs", but lots of places claim gourmet burgers, and some actually live up to the name. Plus of course the patty itself can be made out of pure high quality ground beef and not much else.

So in my lexicon, hot dog = casual snack, while burger = potentially the main part of a filling, delicious meal.
  #32  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:37 PM
madsircool is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 8,202
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerez View Post
Hamburgers saw an uptick in credibility at some point in recent history, and that hasnít happened to hot dogs (yet). Itís also worth considering that, of the few common varieties of both, hamburgers might combine with other ingredientes (basically bacon and cheese) in ways that are more appealing to most people. I think a good Chicago style dog is a work of art but maybe itís not for everyone. Wieners definitely have an ick factor for a lot of people (ETA: as indicated above)
Ill take bacon and queso on my hot dog, please. Both are great. Hotdogs are perhaps easier to prepare as you can throw em in the microwave. Hamburgers are more easily customized with other ingredients.
  #33  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:41 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is online now
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 17,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
The issue is that fast food places were all hamburger places. McDonald's did not sell hot dogs, nor did any other chain.
Not 100% true. When I was a little kid (this would have been the late 1960s or very early 1970s), I didn't like hamburgers, but I did like hot dogs (plain, of course, because I was a fussy child). There was a Burger King near our house (in Downers Grove, IL), where we would occasionally go for a meal, and I'd get a hot dog.

Then, one day, we went to Burger King, my parents ordered a hot dog for me, and the manager had to inform us that they didn't have hot dogs anymore. Apparently, my parents convinced me that a hamburger wouldn't kill me, and I must have liked it, since I became a fan of hamburgers soon after.

Now, I don't know if Burger Kings generally offered hot dogs back then, or not, but a Google Image search did find me a few pictures of old BK menus that feature hot dogs:
https://list.lisimg.com/image/15060015/720full.jpg
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/49/5f...e8ac0b9d79.jpg

Last edited by kenobi 65; 02-24-2020 at 02:43 PM.
  #34  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:42 PM
madsircool is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 8,202
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerez View Post
Plus, you can put ketchup on a hamburger.
Ketchup is the work of the devil. I know this isnt a popular opinion but it cant stand up to salsas and I dislike the added sugar (same with peanut butter).
  #35  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:44 PM
madsircool is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 8,202
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
The issue is that fast food places were all hamburger places. McDonald's did not sell hot dogs, nor did any other chain. There were hot dog stands, but they were not marketed or franchised until after McDonald's, Burger King, Wendy's, and many other burger places caught on.

People got used to getting a burger for fast food. Hot dogs remained a niche restaurant with no national chains.
[Der] Weinerschnitzel isnt a national chain?
  #36  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:47 PM
cmkeller's Avatar
cmkeller is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: New York, NY, USA
Posts: 13,618
Hamburgers are probably MUCH easier to produce on a mass scale than hot dogs - the only ingredient is beef. Slaughter, grind, mold and ship out to franchisees everywhere. Hot dogs require flavorings and processing that make it much more expensive/complicated to do on a mass scale. I'm not saying it's impossible, that's obviously not true - I'm saying that hamburgers are the path of least resistance in that arena.
__________________
"Sherlock Holmes once said that once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the answer. I, however, do not like to eliminate the impossible. The impossible often has a kind of integrity to it that the merely improbable lacks."
-- Douglas Adams's Dirk Gently, Holistic Detective
  #37  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:49 PM
pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 49,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Airbeck View Post
I also am a SW side of Chicago resident, of my whole life actually, and I do see hotdog carts sometimes. Not just at random corners, no, but both Fat Tommy's and Fat Johnny's have carts that can be hired for parties/events. Although I think Fat Johnny (senior) just passed, so they may have retired that. I've also seen hot dog carts at Kennedy and Beverly parks during little league and softball season. So they exist, but not just randomly rolling down the sidewalk or anything like that.
Yeah, the regulations in Chicago have been pretty strict and financially onerous for hot dog push carts. There were laws passed in 2017 to make it a bit easier, from what I've read, but the few push carts I remember from my childhood in the 80s and 90s were from, as far as I know, illegal vendors. This cite says they were illegal until 2015, but does not give a starting date. Chicago Parks seems to have a different set of requirements. I personally would not be surprised, though, if local law enforcement turns a blind eye to non-compliant vendors.

That said, I just don't see them around. I vaguely remember one outside a bar on 55th and one of the K-streets here back in the 2000s, but that was a non-mobile stand and it didn't last for too long.

Last edited by pulykamell; 02-24-2020 at 02:52 PM.
  #38  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:53 PM
Little Nemo is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 85,209
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Yeah, with burgers youíre starting for the most part with raw ingredients, so you donít have the markup of buying a premade hot dog
I agree. A restaurant can buy ground beef and make its hamburgers in house. But they would have to buy hot dogs pre-made from a supplier. So there's more profit in selling hamburgers.
  #39  
Old 02-24-2020, 02:58 PM
SirRay is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: The Industrial NorthEast
Posts: 1,589
Quote:
Originally Posted by madsircool View Post
[Der] Weinerschnitzel isnt a national chain?
No:
Quote:
Wienerschnitzel serving Hot Dog, Chili Cheese-Burgers, Corn Dogs, Chili, Tastee-Freez, and Breakfast. More than 320 quick-serve restaurants in 11 states.
Neither is Sonic really, nor Nathans, nor Papaya Dog, nor even Checkers..., which are most of the few 'chains' that sell hot dogs in my area.

Last edited by SirRay; 02-24-2020 at 03:00 PM.
  #40  
Old 02-24-2020, 03:03 PM
Skywatcher's Avatar
Skywatcher is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Somewhere in the Potomac
Posts: 36,066
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
If one looks at the top 10 US burger chains, as far as I can tell, only Sonic, Five Guys, Hardees, and Carl's Jr. offer hot dogs -- the latter two are effectively the same chain, and they have, it appears, only one hot dog (a chili dog) on their menu.
That list omits places like DQ, which also serves hamburgers and chili dogs at some 4500 locations nationwide.
  #41  
Old 02-24-2020, 03:05 PM
bump is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 19,394
I kind of think it's not just that restaurants can customize burgers, or that they're considered lower quality, but rather that there's a perception that you're not getting your money's worth. At least that's what I always figure when I see a hot dog on the menu somewhere like Five Guys. The assumption is that they're just heating up some readily available brand of hot dogs (the vast majority of which are precooked) and putting toppings on them, which is something you can do at home very easily, while hamburgers require a little more effort and preparation, and there are significant differences between raw materials.

I mean, if I want a Hebrew National hot dog, I'll buy a package and make my own, rather than pay someone 3x the price to make one for me.
  #42  
Old 02-24-2020, 03:07 PM
Jophiel's Avatar
Jophiel is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Chicago suburbia
Posts: 19,857
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamoral View Post
Burgers are just less of a hassle to eat.
That was my first thought. Hot dogs are open topped and stuff has more of a tendency to spill out.

There's a butcher shop near here that sells freshly made & cooked hot dogs during the summer and they are delicious. They're also a lot harder to eat in the car than a cheeseburger if you don't want to risk wearing a bunch of mustard-covered onion bits. Burgers just strike me as more convenient.
  #43  
Old 02-24-2020, 03:10 PM
madsircool is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 8,202
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirRay View Post
No:
Neither is Sonic really, nor Nathans, nor Papaya Dog, nor even Checkers..., which are most of the few 'chains' that sell hot dogs in my area.
Ignorance fought. Thank you for the clarification.

In LA wer have a specialty hotdog place called Pinks. Delicious but pricey.

http://www.pinkshollywood.com/
  #44  
Old 02-24-2020, 03:12 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is online now
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 17,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skywatcher View Post
That list omits places like DQ, which also serves hamburgers and chili dogs at some 4500 locations nationwide.
Good catch; QSR Magazine lists DQ in a separate segment (snack restaurants, rather than burger restaurants). Though they have 4400+ locations, I don't know how many of those are "Brazier" restaurants (i.e., they serve hot food as well as ice cream desserts).

Last edited by kenobi 65; 02-24-2020 at 03:14 PM.
  #45  
Old 02-24-2020, 03:17 PM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 13,370
Quote:
Originally Posted by furryman View Post
WAG: I blame convenience stores, who wants to eat one of those?
I do.
In my area, there are lots more places that sell hot dogs than hamburgers.
  #46  
Old 02-24-2020, 03:40 PM
Chronos's Avatar
Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 87,445
I think the fundamental difference is that hot dogs are easier to make than hamburgers, and that goes both ways. At home, hot dogs are likely more popular, as well as in street carts and concession stands, for that reason. But people aren't interested in getting a dog from a regular restaurant, precisely because it's something they can easily get at home.
  #47  
Old 02-24-2020, 04:19 PM
kanicbird is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 20,168
To me hotdogs have a specific taste that is good, but it's more of a once in a while good not a casual food good. Burgers have that everyday satisfaction. In that hotdogs are more of a delicacy or specialty item while burgers are that down home goodness. Both are part of a well balanced diet. I do suspect it is not because of marketing or availability but because of the flavor that causes this natural divide.
  #48  
Old 02-24-2020, 04:34 PM
Skywatcher's Avatar
Skywatcher is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Somewhere in the Potomac
Posts: 36,066
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
Good catch; QSR Magazine lists DQ in a separate segment (snack restaurants, rather than burger restaurants).
I see Auntie Anne's is on that list; their pretzel dogs are pretty good.
  #49  
Old 02-24-2020, 04:36 PM
Colibri's Avatar
Colibri is offline
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 44,586
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
So in my lexicon, hot dog = casual snack, while burger = potentially the main part of a filling, delicious meal.
I think that this is a big part of it. A hot dog is viewed as a snack food. You grab it off a food cart on the street, or a counter stand, or at the ball park. It's in the same category as soft pretzels, or peanuts, or ice cream cones. If you accompany it with anything it's potato chips or a knish, not fries. You wouldn't go to a sit-down restaurant to eat one.

Burgers are more apt to be regarded as a full meal, for lunch or even dinner. While you can pick them up at the drive-thru window, people are more likely to eat them as a sit-down meal.
  #50  
Old 02-24-2020, 04:36 PM
Tom Tildrum is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Falls Church, Va.
Posts: 14,083
Why can't restaurants make their own hot dogs?
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:32 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2019 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017