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Old 02-24-2020, 07:11 PM
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Is guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier a sought-after posting or something most want to avoid?


I get that the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is a place of honor and highly regarded. In that sense I would suppose those soldiers who get to guard it would consider it a very honorable thing to do (and it is).

That said it seems like it would be a deadly dull task that is often exacerbated by bad weather. Marching endlessly, unable to go to the bathroom or scratch an itch or talk and often in uncomfortable weather...it does not seem something most people would want to do. Honorable or not.

So, are there soldiers competing for the honor or is someone "volunteered" for the job?
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Old 02-24-2020, 07:16 PM
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Guards have to apply for the job. The badge for that position is the second rarest in the military after the astronaut badge.
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Old 02-24-2020, 07:34 PM
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The guards also chew out the crowd if someone is disrespectful.

It's a standard text, but they make it very serious.

People also lay wreaths at the tomb. The guards oversee that. Their shift at the tomb itself is no more than an hour before they're replaced.
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Last edited by RealityChuck; 02-24-2020 at 07:38 PM.
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Old 02-24-2020, 07:50 PM
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Their shift at the tomb itself is no more than an hour before they're replaced.
That makes a huge difference. Marching up and down the square for an hour may be boring but it's only an hour and very doable without going out of your mind from boredom.
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Old 02-24-2020, 07:53 PM
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That makes a huge difference. Marching up and down the square for an hour may be boring but it's only an hour and very doable without going out of your mind from boredom.
Yeah, but they are on 24 hour shifts, eating and sleeping in an on-site barracks. It must be like being a fireman except you never leave the station.
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Old 02-24-2020, 08:23 PM
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Guards have to apply for the job. The badge for that position is the second rarest in the military after the astronaut badge.
The fact that it is rare tells us nothing about whether it is sought-after.
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Old 02-24-2020, 08:33 PM
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By definition, if one has to apply, then it is sought after.
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Old 02-24-2020, 08:44 PM
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Considering what soldiers have to do to earn they right to walk those 21 steps, Yeah, I'd say they really want it. Nobody is getting "volluntold" to do this.

Video from "Today I Found Out" on the subject
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Old 02-24-2020, 09:05 PM
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Considering what soldiers have to do to earn they right to walk those 21 steps, Yeah, I'd say they really want it. Nobody is getting "volluntold" to do this.

Video from "Today I Found Out" on the subject
Great video. Thanks. Pretty much answers my question completely (and then some).
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Old 02-24-2020, 09:11 PM
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I know people volunteered for it back in the 80s and you had to have an impeccable record to qualify. Its not for everyone but there are people who want to do it.

Operation Deep Freeze was also strictly volunteer.
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Old 02-24-2020, 09:40 PM
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That makes a huge difference. Marching up and down the square for an hour may be boring but it's only an hour and very doable without going out of your mind from boredom.
How much time between shifts? How many days in a row?
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Old 02-24-2020, 09:47 PM
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Yeah, but they are on 24 hour shifts, eating and sleeping in an on-site barracks. It must be like being a fireman except you never leave the station.
It's only temporary for coming on and off duty though - mostly for preparing their uniforms after coming in for duty and catching a few Z's in between the 30 or 60 minute turns. Recruits who've passed the initial tests to become guards, but haven't been sufficiently trained to do so, will actually help the guards out with their uniforms before going on duty, like dressers for a Broadway show. (The uniforms are unique to that particular duty.) The guards normally live in barracks at the base, or in houses with their families, like most soldiers.
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Old 02-24-2020, 09:50 PM
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How much time between shifts? How many days in a row?
No idea. The video that was linked above did mention that their serious composure must be maintained in the barracks on-site (can't even smile). So downtime is not especially great either as a means to unwind.

Sounds like they all take great pride given the near insane levels of perfection demanded but that is a lot to maintain non-stop. I hope they get some real downtime in there somewhere. That said they have been doing this for over 80 years and so far they seem to have it under control.
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Old 02-24-2020, 10:40 PM
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How much time between shifts? How many days in a row?
24 on.. 24 off, 24 on.. 24 off, 24 on... 96 off.
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Old 02-24-2020, 10:45 PM
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By definition, if one has to apply, then it is sought after.
No; it's only sought-after if people do in fact apply. And it's only notably sought-after or much sought-after if lots of people apply. The fact that very few places are offered tells us zero about how many people apply for those places.

Last edited by UDS; 02-24-2020 at 10:46 PM.
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Old 02-24-2020, 10:48 PM
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24 on.. 24 off, 24 on.. 24 off, 24 on... 96 off.
Regimental Sergeant Major: Today we're going to do marching up and down the square. That is unless any of you got anything better to do? Well, anyone got anything they'd rather be doing than marching up and down the square?
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Old 02-24-2020, 11:24 PM
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You're talking about the pretty boys. The Old Guard. The Third Infantry Regiment.

For every hour they are on display, they probably spend 3 getting ready.

Long ago when I was in the infantry, there were two units I never wanted to be assigned to: the Old Guard and the Berlin Brigade. I don't think I was tall enough and definitely not pretty enough to be in the Old Guard. And the Berlin Brigade use to smear baby oil on their armored vehicles so they would shine brighter than those on the other side of the wall. They both spent a lot of time marching up & down looking good.

I preferred the snow/rain/swamp/jungle/sand--as did many others I served with. But to each their own.
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Old 02-25-2020, 07:52 AM
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The guards also chew out the crowd if someone is disrespectful.

It's a standard text, but they make it very serious.
There are a lot of YouTube videos out there showing just that, and at least one where the guard chambers a round, so, yeah...
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Old 02-25-2020, 09:51 AM
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24 on.. 24 off, 24 on.. 24 off, 24 on... 96 off.

I worked the same schedule when I was in the Navy, it was a temporary assignment to a communication outfit. Did it for about 3 months. Destroyed my marriage and made it difficult to live a normal life.
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Old 02-25-2020, 09:51 AM
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Yeah, but they are on 24 hour shifts, eating and sleeping in an on-site barracks. It must be like being a fireman except you never leave the station.
They don't sleep on-site. They live in regular barracks at Fort Myer. Some even live off post with their families.
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Old 02-25-2020, 09:55 AM
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Considering what soldiers have to do to earn they right to walk those 21 steps, Yeah, I'd say they really want it. Nobody is getting "volluntold" to do this.

Video from "Today I Found Out" on the subject
I love that channel, but never happened across that specific video. Thank you so much for sharing it!
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Old 02-25-2020, 10:14 AM
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No; it's only sought-after if people do in fact apply.
This statement is a bit silly in context. Obviously since you must apply and the unit is staffed, people must be applying.

Based on information on the Tomb of the Unknowns site and other information, only about 20% of those who apply are accepted, and less than 50% of applicants pass the training regimen. So there at least 10 times more applicants than there are positions in the guard, probably more. So it's clear that the assignment is indeed sought-after by at least some soldiers.

That doesn't imply that most soldiers would want to do it. It can be something that most soldiers want to avoid, while being something that's sought-after by the most highly motivated. But it's clear that there is very high competition for the posts, despite the boring nature of the duty.
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Old 02-25-2020, 10:15 AM
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Great video. Thanks. Pretty much answers my question completely (and then some).
I can't speak specifically to the Tomb guards, but there are a lot of ceremonial honor guards across all branches and pretty much every US military installation large enough to support it. For instance, I was stationed at Youngstown ARS in Northeast Ohio, and the USAF Honor Guard flight there, in addition to supporting all of the droll ceremonies that would take place during a typical drill weekend, were responsible for rendering military honors at any veteran funeral for which they were requested in something like a 250 mile radius. This would typically mean giving up their weekends to drive to remote cemeteries. The typical local honor guard volunteer has a great deal of pride in what they do, and also is looking to beef up their resume for promotions/awards/transfers, in varying quantities. That is, some people are 90% doing it because they love the US Military and it's customs, and some people are 90% doing it because it's good for their career, but most people are somewhere in the middle.

In addition to these local honor guards there are also honor guards are all different levels of command that are a full time job. Like the local ones, these full-time volunteers have some combination of pride + career in mind when they sign up, but additionally they might do it because they hate their current job and just want to do something else.

And lastly, there are the service branch level honor guards that would add an element of "I hate being stationed in BFE North Dakota and being stationed in DC sounds a lot better."

I know representatives from all of those groups from personal interactions, so I think extrapolating from that I can say that the tomb guards probably volunteered based on some combination of pride, career, hating their current job, and hating their current location of assignment. I don't think anyone would get selected if they didn't at least believe in what they were doing, but I also don't think it's a completely altruistic assignment. A lot of people hate DC but some people love it, and it can be a very stable duty location once you're there (meaning rather than getting moved every 2-4 years, you can stay in DC for almost an entire career if you're willing to jump around between assignments). And there are probably some scenarios I'm not thinking of, like people who get medically disqualified from their main job often take jobs like this because they don't have a lot of options but don't want to separate.
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Old 02-25-2020, 10:17 AM
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No; it's only sought-after if people do in fact apply. And it's only notably sought-after or much sought-after if lots of people apply. The fact that very few places are offered tells us zero about how many people apply for those places.
This link says that only 20 percent of applicants are accepted, and even fewer actually do become Tomb guards in the end. So we can perhaps extrapolate to figure out how many are applying.


Edit: Ninja'd by Colibri.

I would imagine that, for many tomb guards, they like being watched by an admiring audience as much as anyone else. (Nothing wrong with that)

Last edited by Velocity; 02-25-2020 at 10:18 AM.
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Old 02-25-2020, 10:23 AM
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I love that channel, but never happened across that specific video. Thank you so much for sharing it!
You're quite welcome. I also enjoy the channel very much but I'm a little dubious about some of the research involved in writing the shows. I generally trust the basic facts as presented but as with any source, take it with a grain (or maybe about 8 lbs of salt) of salt. At best, such internet sources are a starting point for research. They're not the final word.
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Old 02-25-2020, 10:46 AM
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I know people volunteered for it back in the 80s and you had to have an impeccable record to qualify. Its not for everyone but there are people who want to do it.

Operation Deep Freeze was also strictly volunteer.
In the days before internet the army would send out letters to potential candidates most likely based on ASVAB scores. Along with Special Forces recruitment letters I would get letters informing me I could try for the Old Guard. I guess their database didnít have all the information otherwise they would know that I was 1 inch shorter than the minimum height.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:05 AM
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I'll preface this by saying that I don't have direct experience with this honor guard, but I do have some with other Service honor guards.

I'm confident that the answer is 'yes' and 'no.' There are some Enlisted members that would be all over this. They are really driven by the spit and polish aspect of this duty. There are some Enlisted members that would rather get out of the military than to do this. Some of the second type are the most squared away, hard changing members of the military that I'd really like on my team, and I'd hire first if I owned a company. They would rather be in the fleet or in the field making things happen, in their chosen field.

It reminds me a bit of the Navy Blue Angels. I knew one Officer (a flag aid which is a bit telling) that missed the Blue Angels on the last cut and was in actual tears over it. There's a guy on my staff right now that was a Top Gun grad and he'd rather cut his arm off than to be in the "Blue Angel dog and pony show."

You really have to be into that sort of thing to want to do it. So it really depends.

Last edited by spifflog; 02-25-2020 at 11:08 AM.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:28 AM
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How is it seen as a career move?

If I've joined the army and I have a goal of making a career out of it and rising through the ranks, is being an honor guard a good thing to do?

Later on, when somebody in the Pentagon is deciding who gets a promotion to Colonel and command of a brigade, are they going to say "Wow, this guy was part of the honor guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. He's command material."? Or are they going to say "This guy was part of the honor guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. So he can handle the ceremonial stuff. That's nice. But this other guy has combat experience. He's a much better choice for a command."?
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:43 AM
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How is it seen as a career move?

If I've joined the army and I have a goal of making a career out of it and rising through the ranks, is being an honor guard a good thing to do?

Later on, when somebody in the Pentagon is deciding who gets a promotion to Colonel and command of a brigade, are they going to say "Wow, this guy was part of the honor guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. He's command material."? Or are they going to say "This guy was part of the honor guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. So he can handle the ceremonial stuff. That's nice. But this other guy has combat experience. He's a much better choice for a command."?
Not directly. But it looks good on any award and/or decoration packages that a junior enlisted person might be competing for. And then those awards and decs, if attained, will look good on other awards packages and special duty assignment applications that a mid-level enlisted person might be putting in for. And maybe that special duty assignment will look really good in front of the E-7 board. Etc etc.

It's not that people on the E-7 board are looking directly at what someone did 12 years prior as an E-2, but things you can do to stand out have follow-on effects and create opportunities at various stages of your career that other people might not have.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:48 AM
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How is it seen as a career move?

If I've joined the army and I have a goal of making a career out of it and rising through the ranks, is being an honor guard a good thing to do?

Later on, when somebody in the Pentagon is deciding who gets a promotion to Colonel and command of a brigade, are they going to say "Wow, this guy was part of the honor guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. He's command material."? Or are they going to say "This guy was part of the honor guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. So he can handle the ceremonial stuff. That's nice. But this other guy has combat experience. He's a much better choice for a command."?

No tomb guards are being promoted to colonel. They are enlisted. The officer slots above them are good slots. Officers will move on within a couple of years so their time in the unit will be just one data point in their career. It’s not an either/or thing. You can serve in a combat unit and be a tomb guard. Being a tomb guard is one assignment it’s not a career. As per their FAQ the average tour at the tomb is 18 months but there is no set time.

Last edited by Loach; 02-25-2020 at 11:50 AM.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:53 AM
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It's the same question, Little Nemo, as why we encourage athletics and activities for high schoolers. Does Ernst and Young care about your JV basketball experience? No, but maybe that's the deciding factor between two kids applying a specific accounting program.
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Old 02-25-2020, 01:44 PM
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I don't know how valued this is within the Army to know how big a positive it is. I'm sure there are worse tours to take, career wise. There are better as well.

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It's the same question, Little Nemo, as why we encourage athletics and activities for high schoolers. Does Ernst and Young care about your JV basketball experience? No, but maybe that's the deciding factor between two kids applying a specific accounting program.
I don't think this is apt comparison. In high school, my athletic endeavors didn't preclude me from taking any academic course. And extra-curricular activities were just that - extra.

If one takes a tour at the Tomb, her (she?) by definition isn't taking a hard tour in their choose career path, so there is cost. That cost may be worth it, but there is an opportunity cost.
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Old 02-25-2020, 02:19 PM
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If one takes a tour at the Tomb, her (she?) by definition isn't taking a hard tour in their choose career path, so there is cost. That cost may be worth it, but there is an opportunity cost.
Not really. We are only talking 18 months to 2 years for most. For junior enlisted it wonít mean much for their future career but the badge will look impressive in their record. For NCOs and field grade officers their OERs and NCOERs (yearly evaluations) will have the same thing their peers do, leading troops. There is plenty of time to have a well rounded career in your field.

One theory I heard as a career killer at the captain level is being pushed into training commands. You only get the chance at a few true command slots and if you have to spend your time as a captain teaching or supervising students it hurts you. A captain in the Old Guard is commanding troops.
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Old 02-25-2020, 02:34 PM
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Guards have to apply for the job. The badge for that position is the second rarest in the military after the astronaut badge.
I know jack about military badges, but this piqued my interest and it turns out that the "Military Horseman Identification Badge" is currently the rarest, pushing the Astronaut and Tomb of the Unknown Soldier badges down to 2nd and 3rd rarest for now. It came into existence only in 2017 and so I presume it will lose its top spot over time, even though on a quick read it sounds like they won't be passing a lot of them out. Wikipedia links: mention in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier article; Military Horseman Badge article.
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Old 02-25-2020, 04:59 PM
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I know jack about military badges, but this piqued my interest and it turns out that the "Military Horseman Identification Badge" is currently the rarest, pushing the Astronaut and Tomb of the Unknown Soldier badges down to 2nd and 3rd rarest for now. It came into existence only in 2017 and so I presume it will lose its top spot over time, even though on a quick read it sounds like they won't be passing a lot of them out. Wikipedia links: mention in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier article; Military Horseman Badge article.
If we're going to count new badges, then the rarest military badge would be the Expert Soldier Badge. I think there are only about six people wearing it. I think the fairest assessment of rarity would be to divide the number of recipients by the number of years the badge has been active.

Last edited by Bear_Nenno; 02-25-2020 at 05:01 PM.
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Old 02-25-2020, 06:54 PM
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There are a lot of YouTube videos out there showing just that, and at least one where the guard chambers a round, so, yeah...
I was under the belief (sorry no cite) that these guards did not carry live ammunition and that their post was largely ceremonial.

Sure, if you defy the guard and continue to trespass you will be detained and then hauled off to jail by the local police instead of being shot.

But yeah, your point stands that those guys are intimidating. If I accidentally trespassed I would probably deposit the contents of my colon into my pants before I could even voluntarily get back behind the chains and rails as instructed.
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Old 02-25-2020, 07:06 PM
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I was under the belief (sorry no cite) that these guards did not carry live ammunition and that their post was largely ceremonial.
And I'm sure (alas, no cite) that I've heard they do carry live ammunition in a belt pouch. Their weapons are not loaded during a normal shift but that can change at times of heightened alert. Naturally a well trained soldier can load the weapon and chamber a round in much less time than you might think. What it would actually take to make them do that? Well, the army is coy about that and I'm in no hurry to find out personally. Actually pulling the trigger on a live round, even as a warning shot, would be nearly unthinkable.
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Old 02-25-2020, 09:21 PM
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For instance, I was stationed at Youngstown ARS in Northeast Ohio, and the USAF Honor Guard flight there, in addition to supporting all of the droll ceremonies that would take place during a typical drill weekend, were responsible for rendering military honors at any veteran funeral for which they were requested in something like a 250 mile radius.
We had some of these guys (well, not specifically those guys but same idea) at my dad's funeral. Was really great to have them there.
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Old 02-25-2020, 09:59 PM
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And I'm sure (alas, no cite) that I've heard they do carry live ammunition in a belt pouch. Their weapons are not loaded during a normal shift but that can change at times of heightened alert. Naturally a well trained soldier can load the weapon and chamber a round in much less time than you might think. What it would actually take to make them do that? Well, the army is coy about that and I'm in no hurry to find out personally. Actually pulling the trigger on a live round, even as a warning shot, would be nearly unthinkable.
That's sort of my point. Even if someone strolls across the plaza and starts spray painting graffiti on the Tomb, the guard is not going to shoot the person. So to have live ammunition in a rifle seems to be a bad idea.

I'm sure that person will be restrained in a fashion that will be very unpleasant and be held for the police to transport them to jail where their sentence will be much higher than for a regular spray painting, but my point is that the whole pomp and ceremony of the guard at the Tomb is just that: ceremony.
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Old 02-25-2020, 10:00 PM
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There are a lot of YouTube videos out there showing just that, and at least one where the guard chambers a round, so, yeah...
Here is one such video: Tomb of the Unknown Soldier TRESPASSED, YELLING & FAINTING Compilation

I wonder if there is anywhere else in the US treated with such reverence?
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Old 02-25-2020, 10:10 PM
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That's sort of my point. Even if someone strolls across the plaza and starts spray painting graffiti on the Tomb, the guard is not going to shoot the person. So to have live ammunition in a rifle seems to be a bad idea.
Maybe the point is to suggest they are legit guards with weapons and ammo.

Their protocol may be, "don't shoot anyone who is not shooting at you" but the point mostly is they are legit soldiers, legit guards with legit weapons and ammo.

The whole thing is not a performance piece. The guards are real guards who are really guarding.
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Old 02-25-2020, 10:12 PM
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That's sort of my point. Even if someone strolls across the plaza and starts spray painting graffiti on the Tomb, the guard is not going to shoot the person. So to have live ammunition in a rifle seems to be a bad idea.

I'm sure that person will be restrained in a fashion that will be very unpleasant and be held for the police to transport them to jail where their sentence will be much higher than for a regular spray painting, but my point is that the whole pomp and ceremony of the guard at the Tomb is just that: ceremony.
Apparently the Army is coy about whether or not the weapons are loaded but I would bet an extreme amount of money that they aren't, for the exact same reason that prison guards don't carry loaded weapons. Having a loaded weapon in a less than ideal defensive situation around a bunch of unpredictable tourists is a huge liability.
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Old 02-25-2020, 10:13 PM
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The whole thing is not a performance piece. The guards are real guards who are really guarding.
In fancy shoes with no radios to call for backup in a hurry. It's not really an ideal defensive posture.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:21 PM
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In fancy shoes with no radios to call for backup in a hurry. It's not really an ideal defensive posture.
The rifles are unloaded and the guards are unarmed. The only thing carried on their belt is a sheath for the bayonet. The small guard shack has a phone for emergencies. If someone refuses to listen to the guard, he/she simply calls the commander who notifies the police. Officers from both the National Park Police and the 289th Military Police Company would respond.
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Old 02-26-2020, 03:05 AM
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When you are marching you are not fighting
When you are guarding a vacant tomb you are not fighting
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Old 02-26-2020, 06:02 AM
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The rifles are unloaded and the guards are unarmed. The only thing carried on their belt is a sheath for the bayonet.
You state this with certainty. Do you have a supporting cite?

My outright WAG is that the guards carry ammunition somewhere on their person. They can load, chamber and even fire said ammunition as the situation warrants and subject to an after action review of their actions by their commanding officer. Given the very public and sensitive nature of their duties, any such review of he guard's actions would bring the highest levels of scrutiny and demand justification for any such measures. Also given the nature of the guard's duties, discipline and training, I personally have little doubt that they are trusted to carry live ammunition during their duty shifts with the understanding that they will use it as the situation requires.
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Old 02-26-2020, 06:28 AM
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Apparently the Army is coy about whether or not the weapons are loaded but I would bet an extreme amount of money that they aren't, for the exact same reason that prison guards don't carry loaded weapons. Having a loaded weapon in a less than ideal defensive situation around a bunch of unpredictable tourists is a huge liability.
A crowd of convicts who would like to escape from prison is not the same as a crowd of tourists who have come to observe the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

This Quora response claims that the guards used to carry ammo, but don't anymore.

Here is a Reddit AMA discussion started by a former Tomb guard. Lots of interesting stuff there, though no confirmation as to whether or not they carry live ammunition. The only meaningful mention is a reference to the FAQ hosted by the Society of the Honor Guard:

Quote:
Originally Posted by www.tombguard.org
Tomb Guards carry fully functional M14 rifles. Given the current climate surrounding the relatively recent tragic events in Canada (attack upon the guard at the Canadian War Memorial), we will no longer be answering questions relating to specifics regarding current security and armament at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. We appreciate your understanding.

Rest assured, that the US Army has the post secured as it has been since we started guard duty at the shrine in 1926.
The "events in Canada" they refer to is apparently the 2014 terror attack in which a guard at Canada's National War memorial was shot to death; the guard was carrying an unloaded weapon at the time.
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Old 02-26-2020, 06:51 AM
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A crowd of convicts who would like to escape from prison is not the same as a crowd of tourists who have come to observe the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.
Fair point, the comparison is not perfect, but every tourist site in DC has ample anti-terrorism measures. I don't think the FBI thinks of tourists like prisoners, but I do think that the anti-terrorism boffins there would be mindful of putting a fully loaded weapon in the vicinity of a potential target, in case a baddie steals it.

I do appreciate your efforts in finding a cite, and I wish there were one being this is GQ and all; I did the same searches and found the some conjecture that you did. But the more I think about it the more I'm certain they don't carry ammunition. Remember that this is a ceremonial position, and tomb guards are not MPs. I don't see any evidence that they're trained in things like crowd control, deescalation tactics, and making lawful arrests. Every other person you see guarding a military installation will be in that service's police equivalent, and will have training in those areas just like the Park Police who patrol Arlington Cemetery. I know the "everyone is infantry" mentality, but guarding a weapons cache in the AOR and guarding a tourist site in a national park are two very different skillsets. Tomb guards might very well be personnelists or supply clerks who haven't fired a weapon since boot.

Of course, this being GQ, my certainty doesn't account for much.
  #49  
Old 02-26-2020, 07:01 AM
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I know the "everyone is infantry" mentality, but guarding a weapons cache in the AOR and guarding a tourist site in a national park are two very different skillsets. Tomb guards might very well be personnelists or supply clerks who haven't fired a weapon since boot.

Of course, this being GQ, my certainty doesn't account for much.
Tomb Guards are exclusively from The Old Guard.
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The 3d U.S. Infantry, traditionally known as "The Old Guard," is the oldest active-duty infantry unit in the Army, serving our nation since 1784.

The Old Guard is the Army's official ceremonial unit and escort to the president, and it also provides security for Washington, D.C., in time of national emergency or civil disturbance.
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Old 02-26-2020, 07:14 AM
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Tomb Guards are exclusively from The Old Guard.
Yes, but that doesn't mean they're all 11Bs. Cite. They come from all over the army.
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