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Old 02-26-2020, 06:04 AM
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So, the cops knock at my door


It's 7pm, I'm decked out in jammies (cuz that's how I roll) watching My Name is Earl with the Mrs and Kid Cheesesteak, when the doorbell rings.

It's the police, doing a welfare check on my next door neighbor, a 33 year old single black woman. She already lived there when we moved in 13 years ago, it's her dad's house and her grandma's before that. She lives alone, her parents moved to Maryland sometime before we moved in, but held onto the house for her. She's college educated, has a job in NYC, a boyfriend, no kids, we don't see too much of her, that's how NYC schedules work for young professionals.

Seems she's been missing since 6:30am, and her friends reported it to the police. We try to call her dad, no luck, maybe my number is out of date. We tell the police that no, we don't suspect drug use, no sketchy people going in and out, just a quiet neighbor, you know? The police tell us they'll likely force the door to check inside, and go on their way.

8pm, a fire truck has come and gone, to help force the door, I'm sure. The Mrs. is a wreck with worry. The bell rings again, we figure it's the police. It isn't, it's my neighbor. She was walking back from the bus stop (we have a NYC commuter bus that passes nearby, convenient) and saw her front door open and empty police car out front, figured she better ask us what was going on before surprising a couple of cops by walking in the door. Not a bad choice all in all. My wife hugs her, cries and says "I'm coming with you." I stay in with our kid because, you know, jammies.

Turns out our neighbor left her phone on the kitchen table when she got on the bus this morning. She said to herself "damn, this is going to be a bad day, my whole life is on that phone."

So true.
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Old 02-26-2020, 07:18 AM
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So glad everything's ok. As I got into your post I expected the worst.
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Old 02-26-2020, 07:25 AM
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She had not been in contact with anyone for all of 12 hours and police were checking up on her at her house? Damn, the times we live in...
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Old 02-26-2020, 07:27 AM
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Some non-elderly adult hasn't been in contact with people for 12 hours and the police come looking for them and even break into their house? That seems really weird. I thought someone had be out of touch for days before the police considered them missing.
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Old 02-26-2020, 07:38 AM
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her fiends called the police instead of her workplace?
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Old 02-26-2020, 07:44 AM
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I know, right? We thought it was odd too, but Montclair is not exactly Newark, despite being near each other, and the police obviously didn't have more pressing concerns at the moment.

My wife did tell me the police were not nearly as thrilled as she was to find out their missing person just left her phone at home.
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Old 02-26-2020, 07:46 AM
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Old 02-26-2020, 07:51 AM
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but Montclair is not exactly Newark
Wow, sick burn.
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Old 02-26-2020, 07:51 AM
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So she wasn't at work? It certainly seems like the friends would check there first.

I was on the other end of a situation like this, when a coworker had been out sick for a couple of days and then didn't call or respond to calls on the third day. His wife was out of town, and we decided we'd better have the police do a wellness check, but only after contacting his wife (she hadn't heard from him that day yet either). So, depending on the situation, 12 hours out of contact is not out of line for a wellness check.
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Old 02-26-2020, 08:03 AM
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her fiends called the police instead of her workplace?
I know what my friends do but not necessarily their workplace, & even for those that I do know where they work, I don't have their work numbers, only their cell & email. Even if I do have their work number, I only have their number, not their boss's or cow-orker's number. If they're out at a client or vendor or in an all-day meeting, they're not picking up their desk phone. I've also worked at places that were an outpost of a much larger corporation. There was no HR in our local office. In this day & age of stalkers & needing to be cautious do you thing HR would confirm or deny anything to an individual who is not law enforcement?

Many police depts aren't going to kick down doors for a normal, healthy adult who has been out of contact for only 12 hrs. A history of bad DV or drug abuse may alter their decision but if they kick a door & leave the property damaged or unsecured & you are subsequently burgled they would probably have liability.
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Old 02-26-2020, 10:52 AM
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Many police depts aren't going to kick down doors for a normal, healthy adult who has been out of contact for only 12 hrs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CNN
On December 29, one of his relatives asked Osceola police to check on the family, "because she had been told that (the Todt family) all had the flu and she had not heard from them in two days," Gibson said last month.
But the deputy who visited the home received no answer at the door, and having no cause to enter the house, they left. Link
Above was a family that had no contact for two days & the PD didn't kick the door in.
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Old 02-26-2020, 12:10 PM
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Eons ago, a super-reliable coworker didn't show up one morning. He was a T1 diabetic who lived alone. First thing the boss did was call him, and fortunately, the phone woke him and he was able to deal with his blood glucose and he got to work just fine, if late. But if he hadn't answered, I have no doubt the boss would have either gone to the guy's house himself or called for help.

I think we were all relieved when he got married.
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Old 02-26-2020, 01:01 PM
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OK, My google fu does not come up with any reasonable definitions that make sense. So what the heck is "bad DV"? I only can come up with "bad diverter valve". We are not talking about a turbocharged engine here.

Rant/ Why the heck do folks assume that everyone know their personal/professional acronyms? /End Rant.

DV=Domestic Violence? Now that can make sense here. Is that what you mean? Why am I guessing here?
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Old 02-26-2020, 01:59 PM
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Maybe the neighbor does have an illness like T1 diabetes. As a neighbor the OP might not know, but her friends and family would.
I'm not understanding why they didn't contact her employer, as well.
A Doper(dropzone) had the sheriff's office send a well-check on me from a few states away. After just a coupla hours they were here, they called my DIL first. She arrived well before the deputy.

I suspect if/when the COVID pandemic expands into middle America we may see more of this.
We gotta watch out for each other, folks.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 02-26-2020 at 02:01 PM.
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Old 02-26-2020, 03:35 PM
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Let me just take a moment to give many thanks to any and all deities, spirits, and good thoughts that nobody got dead or shot or disappeared suspiciously!

With the news bogged down in stories of missing kids, missing moms, missing students, this story has a happy ending.

I like happy!


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Old 02-26-2020, 04:52 PM
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This story sounds suspicious to me. The Montclair PD investigating a 33 year old single woman who has been "missing" since the start of the work day? That's not "missing", that's "she's probably at work not answering your calls". My wife doesn't even report me missing in that short amount of time.
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Old 02-26-2020, 05:27 PM
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I guess I'll be the one to ask.

It's 8 pm in Montclair and your front door has been kicked out of it's frame. It might be shattered, your door frame might be shattered. Either way, wind and wet leaves are blowing into your living-room.
First, who could you even call? (because, yes, not having a front door that closes really is an emergency whether it's Montclair or Newark) I'm sure it won't be cheap... and full repairs and possibly door frame upgrades might need to be involved.

Second, I know that it will be a hefty bill... and it'll have to be put on her credit card tonight... but ultimately who pays for it? Does the PD pay for it? The town? Who does she submit the bill to...?
Or... because it was a welfare check, does she just have to eat an unexpected huge bill...? How does this all work? Does anybody here know?

Last edited by Mundane Super Hero; 02-26-2020 at 05:30 PM.
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Old 02-26-2020, 05:46 PM
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Let's assume that her friends and the police were smart enough to check to see if she'd shown up for work. And let's be clear that this was a welfare check, not a missing person report (which in many places no longer requires the person be missing for 24 hours).

Once when I didn't show up for work, my employer was about to call for police to do a welfare check because I NEVER simply didn't show for work. I also lived alone. Turns out the boss totally forgot I'd cleared a late arrival time with him a few days earlier. Work folks were very relieved to see me, and I was relieved to know people had my back.

I also knew a guy in his forties who lived alone and took a nasty fall. He couldn't get to his phone and died alone the next day. A welfare check might have saved him.

I'm relieved the OP's neighbor was OK and very glad the cops did a welfare check on her.
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Old 02-26-2020, 05:55 PM
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Second, I know that it will be a hefty bill... and it'll have to be put on her credit card tonight... but ultimately who pays for it? Does the PD pay for it? The town? Who does she submit the bill to...?
Or... because it was a welfare check, does she just have to eat an unexpected huge bill...? How does this all work? Does anybody here know?
The police can drive a tank through your house, and they don't owe you anything. Slight hyperbole, in that it was an armored vehicle, not a main battle tank. TL/DR, an armed robbery suspect barricaded himself in a random house, not his own house, and instead of waiting him out, the police fired tear gas and other projectiles into the house, used explosives on it, and rammed it with an armored vehicle. The article from October is the latest development, in which the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the police were not liable for any damage, because the damage was done in the course of enforcing the law, not as eminent domain.

So, yes, she probably will have to eat a bill for any damage that was done. Insurance might cover it, but it often has exclusions for government action, and things like that. A new door might not even exceed the deductible, so even if it was covered, it might still not be a reimbursable expense.
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Old 02-26-2020, 06:14 PM
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But it's extremely unlikely that kind of damage was caused in this instance or would be during a routine welfare check. The reason the cops called the fire department in the OP is that firefighters have tools like this one that gain entry without causing damage.
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Old 02-26-2020, 06:39 PM
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But it's extremely unlikely that kind of damage was caused in this instance or would be during a routine welfare check. The reason the cops called the fire department in the OP is that firefighters have tools like this one that gain entry without causing damage.
Or maybe just call a locksmith? It's not like they need to do a tactical breach with battering rams and explosives and whatnot.
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Old 02-26-2020, 07:06 PM
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Or maybe just call a locksmith? It's not like they need to do a tactical breach with battering rams and explosives and whatnot.
Right. I'm guessing the fire department is a cheaper option than calling a locksmith and paying after-hours rates. I'm not sure about the legality and safety of involving a civilian. Maybe someone else can speak to that.
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Old 02-26-2020, 07:34 PM
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As for why the friends/family didn't try to call her workplace - the only person among my family and non-coworker friends who might know my work number is my husband and he's the only one who actually knows where my office is ( although probably not the address) . My kids know the numbers to both my work and personal cell phones- but everyone else just has my home and cell phone number.

The part I don't get is that someone called the police because they couldn't reach her for 12 hours. I mean, maybe she was at work and just to busy to chat or was having a medical procedure done that she didn't want to broadcast to her whole friend network.
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Old 02-26-2020, 07:59 PM
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I'm relieved the OP's neighbor was OK and very glad the cops did a welfare check on her.
I'll take the exact opposite tack - I'm shocked that anyone thought there was a possibility that she wasn't OK after a mere 12 hours of not responding to texts, and I'm annoyed on her behalf that the cops broke down her door on such incredibly flimsy pretense.
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Old 02-26-2020, 08:53 PM
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But it's extremely unlikely that kind of damage was caused in this instance or would be during a routine welfare check. The reason the cops called the fire department in the OP is that firefighters have tools like this one that gain entry without causing damage.

I wasn't doubting you. A friend is an ex-cop and sometimes he refers 'door-kicking'.


I've never seen either done, I never want to either. There are some videos on Youtube that try to scare people into buying door reinforcements... but the truth is that you can't live your life being ruled by fear. ( I will say the fear is evidently a very profitable advertising technique. ) I've read news stories where restraining orders and such might involve an emergency locksmith visit. In the end, who pays the bill is anyone's guess to me. Of my entire post, the one thing I was really curious about was if there actually are companies that do emergency construction repair work. Are there such companies...? Assuming a door gets smashed down by anyone or anything ( cops / robbers / malicious trees ).
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Old 02-26-2020, 08:57 PM
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A great many years ago I called my parents one night and got no answer. I thought this was really odd because they were elderly and not exactly night-time party-goers. I kept trying and when there was no answer well after midnight, I freaked out and called the Montreal police to check on them.

They were fine, and the irony of it was that the greatest hazard was posed by me, because the first thing the officer said when my Mom answered the door was "do you have a son who lives in Ontario?" which caused her to nearly faint because she thought something horrible had happened to me.

This was long before the era of cell phones, and I was always grateful that the Montreal police department got back to me within minutes to say that my parents were just fine, and there was a Bell landline outage in the area. They must have communicated to dispatch and had them call me right away. Everyone was relieved except I suspect my mother, who almost never drank, probably had a couple of shots of brandy that night.
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Old 02-26-2020, 09:42 PM
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We had an incident a few years ago where a well-known staff member at a school right near ours was found dead of a heart attack in his house after failing to turn up for a meeting. When he didn't appear, his colleagues called his wife at her work, and when she couldn't get through to him, they called the police. Unfortunately, it wasn't a happy ending. There was also a widely publicized case a couple of years ago in the neighboring district where a teacher didn't show up for work and the school called the police--it became quickly apparent that there had been foul play, and they found her corpse in a field a week later where her boyfriend had shot her and hidden the body.

Those memories still looms large for a lot of people, and I know on the few occasions at our school when someone has failed to turn up and hasn't left word, they start down the emergency contact list very quickly. I'm obsessive about emailing a bunch of people when I'm out so I don't wake up to the police at my door, because I know it would happen. Heck, I was AT work a few weeks ago after having been out for several days previously with the flu, and a message didn't get through to a coworker that I was going to be late for a meeting due to being double-booked, and she freaked out and sent three other people to search the building for me out of fear that I was still sick and had collapsed in my office or something.

On the one hand, it's a little bit nannyish, but on the other hand, as a single person living alone, it's reassuring to know that if something DOES happen to me and I'm not where I'm expected to be, action will be taken quickly.
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Old 02-26-2020, 09:58 PM
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I understand that people didn't know how to contact her at her work, but still, the assumption should have been that that's where she likely was, being that it was a workday and all.

This was all because she didn't answer her cell phone? No one's ever had a dead battery or lost their phone for a day???

It's one thing to be grateful the police erred on the side of caution, but this is really nuts. She wasn't in any risk group, and she was expected to be at work until the end of the shift, and who doesn't ever stop for groceries on the way home??
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Old 02-26-2020, 10:31 PM
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"Her friends" reported her missing. But not good enough friends that they know where she works? Something doesn't click into place there.

"My friend doesn't answer her phone."
"Have you tried calling her at work?"
'"No idea where she works."

Doesn't sound like an emergency, to me.
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Old 02-26-2020, 10:39 PM
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The OP said
Quote:
Seems she's been missing since 6:30am, and her friends reported it to the police.
If she's been MISSING since 6:30 a.m. that doesn't meant her friends didn't know her work phone number, or they didn't try to reach her at work; it means she's been missing, as in nobody knows where the heck she's been. "Her friends couldn't reach her before or after work, so they over-reacted and so did the police" seems highly unlikely to me.
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Old 02-26-2020, 11:35 PM
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I live alone and I am fully confident that, should I kick off suddenly or become abruptly deathly ill or injured, nobody would notice until the landlord came looking for the rent.

So if that happens near the end of the month, I might be found in time. But early in the month, just after I paid the rent, it could take several weeks.
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Old 02-26-2020, 11:43 PM
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Two cases:

I was talking to my grandmother for close to an hour. Her niece, whose mother (my grandmother's sister) had recently died, starting getting worried when my grandmother's phone was busy for so long. The niece drove over to check on my grandmother. Who was still on the phone. The niece was worried, but quite happy there wasn't a problem.

18 months ago a former coworker didin't show up to work at his place of work. His current coworkers contacted his wife, from whom he is separated, and she was also not able to reach him. The police broke down his door. He had committed suicide.

If the police were not able to check if she had been at work, they should not have broken down the door. Unless there were other circumstances. Because the people at work normally know if you should be at work.
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Old 02-26-2020, 11:45 PM
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A great many years ago I called my parents one night and got no answer. I thought this was really odd because they were elderly and not exactly night-time party-goers. I kept trying and when there was no answer well after midnight, I freaked out and called the Montreal police to check on them.

They were fine, and the irony of it was that the greatest hazard was posed by me, because the first thing the officer said when my Mom answered the door was "do you have a son who lives in Ontario?" which caused her to nearly faint because she thought something horrible had happened to me.

This was long before the era of cell phones, and I was always grateful that the Montreal police department got back to me within minutes to say that my parents were just fine, and there was a Bell landline outage in the area. They must have communicated to dispatch and had them call me right away. Everyone was relieved except I suspect my mother, who almost never drank, probably had a couple of shots of brandy that night.
When my parents were borderline-elderly, also in the pre-universal cell phone era, neither my sister nor I could reach them, and were concerned, so I called our brother, who lived several hours away. His wife answered and said, "They're right here. Wanna talk to them?" and I was quite relieved. They had made a spur of the moment trip to see them and didn't tell us ahead of time.

As for the police's quick response, I also think there may have been something else going on that the OP doesn't know about.

Last edited by nearwildheaven; 02-26-2020 at 11:46 PM.
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Old 02-27-2020, 05:32 AM
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If the police were not able to check if she had been at work, they should not have broken down the door. Unless there were other circumstances. Because the people at work normally know if you should be at work.
After the fact, it does seem weird that they would force open the door if they weren't able to confirm that she was missing from work, and she was simply not available through her phone.

When the police arrived, it was my unspoken assumption that someone expected her to be somewhere, she didn't show up, and couldn't be contacted. Her story contradicted that and I didn't think anything of it at the time.

Now I'm wondering if there's a backstory here I'm never going to learn about...
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Old 02-27-2020, 09:02 AM
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It could be as simple as a well-meaning friend with untreated anxiety. Such people often get into a worry spiral, and from inside the spiral their fears look perfectly reasonable.

And honestly, t'were it me I'd rather they be wrong by checking than by not, even if that meant coming home to splintered wood - which I highly doubt it did. Firemen have to splinter doors because seconds matter; cops can take a few minutes to get through cleanly. A woman alone is always a target, and will be reminded of that fact by cat-calls and wolf-whistles several times a week. I lived alone for over thirty years, and I often wondered whether help would come in time if I got sick on a weekend. Once cell phones became a thing I made it a practice to keep mine always in my pocket from the moment I got up in the morning. And I would always invite a couple of ladies from work to my home at least once, so that somebody knew where I lived.

I don't think it's nannyish to check on someone who has broken routine uncharacteristically. That's what society is meant to be - people looking out for each other.
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Old 02-27-2020, 09:59 AM
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"Her friends" reported her missing. But not good enough friends that they know where she works? Something doesn't click into place there.
This has changed for many people in the last 20 years. I used to know where all my friends worked; our jobs were a major part of who we were. But there's been a big shift in me and the people I hang out with away from that focus on jobs.

I know the secrets of my friends, what they want out of life, what keeps them up at night. But for most of them, I don't know details of their jobs. This guy does something in sales, that guy's works for a shoe company, but I can't remember if it's Nike or Adidas now. Unless I met them through work, I don't think I could reach a single friend at their job if I needed to.
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Old 02-27-2020, 11:33 AM
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I don't think it's nannyish to check on someone who has broken routine uncharacteristically. That's what society is meant to be - people looking out for each other.

It’s not, but that’s not what the OP described. It said that the police were there at 7 pm, that she was “missing” since 6:30 am and that she was walking back from the (NYC commuter) bus stop when she rang the bell. It didn’t describe her uncharacteristically not showing up at work , or someone in her household reporting that she was expected home from work at a certain time and hadn’t arrived hours later, or that she missed a pre-arranged daily check-in call , which usually involves people well past 33 who are out of the work force.

My guess is there’s more to the story than the OP was told. Maybe true, maybe not, but I can’t see the police showing up just because she didn’t answer the phone for 12 hours when there are so many other reasons for not answering.
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Old 02-27-2020, 12:02 PM
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On the one hand, it's a little bit nannyish, but on the other hand, as a single person living alone, it's reassuring to know that if something DOES happen to me and I'm not where I'm expected to be, action will be taken quickly.
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I don't think it's nannyish to check on someone who has broken routine uncharacteristically. That's what society is meant to be - people looking out for each other.
Yeah, because police wellness checks never go wrong.
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Old 02-27-2020, 01:47 PM
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Sorry for the cut and paste. The system isn't letting me reply with quote.

Quote:
Cheesesteak: Now I'm wondering if there's a backstory here I'm never going to learn about...
This is almost certainly the case. I did some research online, and police normally don't do a welfare check just because a young, healthy person doesn't show up for work and/or a dinner date. From what I've read, police usually do welfare checks for urgent situations, such as

the person is at high risk for suicide, as in the person sent a suicidal text or recently attempted suicide and can't be contacted
the person has a health condition such as diabetes or a heart condition and can't be contacted
the person is elderly and can't be contacted
the caller's child is at a residence and the residents can't be contacted

Your neighbor probably falls into one of the first two categories.

For those who hate the idea of the police coming to your home to do a welfare check, tell your friends and families you don't want them to every ask for one, even if you're dying on the floor.
  #40  
Old 02-27-2020, 02:21 PM
teela brown is offline
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Once the police showed up at our door and said that they were doing a wellness check on one of the women who lived in the shared-wall home next door. They wanted to know if it was the neighbors' habit to leave the house with the windows wide open. We had never heard of a "wellness check" before. The police knocked on their door, peered in through open windows and called, and finally left without seeing anyone.

As time went on, we figured out what was up. The adult daughter of the house was in the habit of overdosing, and one of her friends probably hadn't heard from her for awhile and called the police. With good reason - the paramedics were called to that house about half a dozen times over the course of the next few years and hauled the daughter off to the hospital.

Last edited by teela brown; 02-27-2020 at 02:22 PM.
  #41  
Old 02-27-2020, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by muldoonthief View Post

Sometimes parking a car goes horribly wrong. Its not an excuse for what happened in that one case but we do maybe hundreds of wellness checks of various types within a year and nothing close to that has ever happened and we are just one medium sized town.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nelliebly View Post
Sorry for the cut and paste. The system isn't letting me reply with quote.



This is almost certainly the case. I did some research online, and police normally don't do a welfare check just because a young, healthy person doesn't show up for work and/or a dinner date. From what I've read, police usually do welfare checks for urgent situations, such as

the person is at high risk for suicide, as in the person sent a suicidal text or recently attempted suicide and can't be contacted
the person has a health condition such as diabetes or a heart condition and can't be contacted
the person is elderly and can't be contacted
the caller's child is at a residence and the residents can't be contacted

Your neighbor probably falls into one of the first two categories.

For those who hate the idea of the police coming to your home to do a welfare check, tell your friends and families you don't want them to every ask for one, even if you're dying on the floor.
Yes and no. We would do a welfare check on someone if requested. If someone calls in concerned we are going to go to the house. By that I mean knocking on the door. In order for it to go beyond that to the point that entry is being made there has to be a lot more than just no one has heard from them in 12 hours. I suspect that one of the friends said something sufficiently alarming that it was considered enough of an exigent circumstance that they could request a ping of the phone. Combine whatever alarming circumstance that came from the friend with the phone coming back to the house and no one answering the door and I would authorize entry. Thats just a guess of course. But I agree there is more that the cops were told than what the OP heard.
  #42  
Old 02-27-2020, 04:22 PM
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Another extenuating circumstance beyond what nelliebly listed would be if there was reason to fear she was at risk of violence, like from an ex with a restraining order or other history of boundary issues. Sadly, that seems more likely than some of the other possibilities.
  #43  
Old 02-27-2020, 05:57 PM
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If I was her friend I would have been worried.

The 33 year old lady was probably never without her phone, making social posts multiple times an hour if not more and making her "presence" known to her friends/family. Then NOTHING! for hours on end, no communication or response to their inquiries. I would be worried also.

Most of our neighbors (except for the rental house) we know of a least 1 family member of theirs in case of any issues with them.
  #44  
Old 02-27-2020, 09:20 PM
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In a lot of places if your (minor child) kid goes missing no one will do anything for 24-48 hours. Why in the world would anyone need to do this for an adult who forgot her phone? I have BEST friends who certainly don't hear from me every work day or necessarily receive a response within a day or so.

Last edited by actualliberalnotoneofthose; 02-27-2020 at 09:21 PM.
  #45  
Old 02-27-2020, 09:37 PM
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Originally Posted by actualliberalnotoneofthose View Post
In a lot of places if your (minor child) kid goes missing no one will do anything for 24-48 hours. Why in the world would anyone need to do this for an adult who forgot her phone? I have BEST friends who certainly don't hear from me every work day or necessarily receive a response within a day or so.
Which places are those? Its federal law that missing juveniles and other endangered person be placed into NCIC as missing immediately.
  #46  
Old 02-28-2020, 09:32 AM
Mama Zappa is offline
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
"Her friends" reported her missing. But not good enough friends that they know where she works? Something doesn't click into place there.....
This.

I have to think there's something more to the story. Perhaps the neighbor has some health issues of the "nunyabizzness-itis" type, that the friends know about but you do not. Perhaps there's a scary ex-boyfriend who might be up to for some fatal mischief . Perhaps the friends have their own issues that cause them to overreact. Perhaps the lack of communication for 12 hours is so wildly out of character for her that it truly would appear to be an emergency.

I'd be surprised if someone ever tried to reach me at my "work" number. For one thing, it's a virtual number (gets routed to a desk if I'm at the office which happens every year or two, gets routed to my cell phone otherwise), so someone attempting to call my employer would have quite a few hoops to go through to even "call" me - and in the OP's scenario, the call would most likely get to my "left at home" phone, so that wouldn't work. I don't know if someone could even call one of my employer's locations (they have a LOT) and say "Can you route me to Mama Zappa's phone please".

On the "finding the person dead" concept, a relevant thread from a year or so back.
  #47  
Old 02-28-2020, 11:55 AM
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If there's not more to this story, she definitely needs to cut contact with some people. Anyone who doesn't realize that the cops on a black person for the 'crime' of not bringing their phone with them to work one day is probably going to get that person killed. And if they don't get killed, they can get the Henry Gates consolation prize and get an arrest for 'disorderly conduct' for not groveling to a cop querying them about 'how dare you be in your own home'.

Last edited by Pantastic; 02-28-2020 at 11:57 AM.
  #48  
Old 02-28-2020, 02:22 PM
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Wow, sick burn.
I'm sitting in Newark as I read this and I have to note the OP is one hundred percent correct: Montclair is not Newark.
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