Khadaji’s Whatcha Reading Thread - February 2021 edition

I can’t think of any. It’s a nice gimmick, though; you’d think it would be more widespread.

Just started Imperial Earth by Arthur C. Clarke, a 1976 sf novel that I read years ago but remember very little of.

Just finished: 1634: The Galileo Affair, by Eric Flint and Andrew Dennis

Now reading: 1634: The Bavarian Crisis, by Eric Flint and Virginia DeMarce

Next up: Ring of Fire II, edited by Eric Flint

Finished The Next Great Paulie Fink , by Ali Benjamin. Meh.

Now I’m reading Amazing and Extraordinary Facts: Cathedrals and Abbeys, by Stephen Halliday.

Just finished: 1634: The Bavarian Crisis, by Eric Flint and Virginia DeMarce

Now reading: Ring of Fire II, edited by Eric Flint

Next up: 1635: The Cannon Law, by Eric Flint and Andrew Dennis

Finished The Unspoken Name. Imagine The Tombs of Atuan, only most of the book is post-temple, and Ged is kind of a self-centered jerk (big stretch right there, but leans into it), and Tenar is an orc.

Good stuff. It’s not gonna change any lives, but for an epic high fantasy, pretty dang good.

I finished the first, a usually-interesting meditation on the bond between people and dogs, the intellectual rewards of literature, the difficulty of being a writer these days, and the dark lure of suicide. Not sure I can recommend it. If you really like dogs and/or books, it might be for you; it certainly isn’t for everybody.

The Clarke book is pretty good - about the visit of a Titan colonial tycoon’s cloned son to humanity’s homeworld in time for the U.S. quincentennial in 2276 - and I’m enjoying it.

I’ve also begun The Ministry for the Future by Kim Stanley Robinson, which Tride mentioned earlier and which my niece, who’s well-read on contemporary sf, recommended. So far, it’s a pretty grim portrait of near-future global climate change.

More lighthearted by far is The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion, about a Dr. Sheldon Cooperesque man’s dispassionate, systematic attempt to find a suitable wife (including a 32-page questionnaire). I’m not too far into it and there’ve been some LOL moments already.

Finished Amazing and Extraordinary Facts: Cathedrals and Abbeys , by Stephen Halliday, which I enjoyed. My favorite fact is that Thomas Wolsey, when he was Lord Chancellor, had a sarcophagus built for himself, but since he died while accused of treason (before his trial) he didn’t get to use it. It was later used for Admiral Nelson, who had died in battle.

Started Tomorrow’s Kin, by Nancy Kress.

New thread: Is that sunshine and blue sky I see?