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  #1  
Old 01-21-2000, 02:54 AM
Skeptic23 Skeptic23 is offline
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Someone I work with has just told me that when they were in the navy, some 30 years ago, they traveled to Iceland. When there, they were told that no "black people" would be allowed into their country. I find this very hard to believe, but could someone either tell me that I'm the most gullable guy or that this IS the case?
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  #2  
Old 01-21-2000, 02:57 AM
Doug Bowe Doug Bowe is offline
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I've heard something similar about Australia.
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  #3  
Old 01-21-2000, 04:31 AM
Erroneous Erroneous is offline
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Doug, you're probably thinking of the White Australia Policy. It's no longer in effect, of course, although there are certain people who'd like to see its return.
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  #4  
Old 01-21-2000, 08:38 AM
Brood McEto Brood McEto is offline
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I was in Iceland in Nov and Dec 96, and I have to tell you that blacks were there. In fact, if you were white, your chances on hooking up with an Icelanic babe were very slim. But, if you were black or hispanic, or, had a really nice tan, you were high on the wanted list. I look just like they do, so I was nothing new to them

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  #5  
Old 01-21-2000, 10:28 AM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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(note to self)

Remember to take large stock of Kiwi on trip to Iceland.
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  #6  
Old 01-21-2000, 04:10 PM
jab1 jab1 is offline
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Where's bj0rn?

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  #7  
Old 01-21-2000, 05:02 PM
Elmer J. Fudd Elmer J. Fudd is offline
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Jab,
You seem to be implying that bj0rn would give some sort of concise, logical and comprehensible answer to the OP's question. My head still hurts from that whole year Zero nonsense.

That doesn't mean that I haven't learned anything from him. If all Icelanders are like bj0rn, then all Icelanders hate Americans. Since most Black visitors to Iceland are American military personel, then...oops, here comes that headache again.

Anyway, don't hold your breath waiting for his reply. I've noticed that bj0rn only visits GD and the Pit. (Does that make it 1 or 3 forums that he posts in?)



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  #8  
Old 01-21-2000, 05:28 PM
UncleBeer UncleBeer is offline
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Don't you mean bj(zero)rn?
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  #9  
Old 01-21-2000, 05:52 PM
krish krish is offline
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How long was the policy in effect, anyway?
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  #10  
Old 01-21-2000, 07:38 PM
handy handy is offline
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I wonder how they tested people to see if they were black? Blacks couldn't own property in Pebble Beach for along time, a convenent said so. Dunno if they still have it, wouldn't surprise me.
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  #11  
Old 01-21-2000, 08:16 PM
Ursa Major Ursa Major is offline
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Here's a link to a thesis on institutional anti-semitic policy in Iceland.
http://notendur.centrum.is/~snorrigb...m#Introduction

As resently as the 1950s, immigation policy in Iceland was almost entirely based on race. (Danes, Norwegians and Germans were okay, Jews, blacks and even Finns were not welcome.)

Here's something I found in this paper that might help clarify what the OP's navy friend was talking about:

Quote:
The basic policy of the Icelandic government was to secure that Jews and blacks could not settle to any extent in Iceland. This form of racism even prevented American soldiers of Afro-American origin from protecting Iceland under the American-Icelandic Defence Pacts from 1941 and 1949.
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  #12  
Old 09-14-2015, 10:16 PM
JustSue JustSue is offline
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It was true in the 50s for certain.

I lived in Iceland in the late '50's for about 5 years. My father was a field engineer for NASA and we were attached to the base. No black or dark-skinned servicemen or civilians were allowed in Iceland at all while we lived there. The Icelanders wanted to keep their race "pure". I remember once when a famous band landed at the airfield to perform - I don't remember the name, but all or some of the band members were black men. The Icelanders would not even allow them to get off the airplane. They had to remain aboard while the plane refueled and prepared to leave again. I heard they changed their practices sometime after we left. I don't know if it was a "law", but I do know that they rigidly imposed the policy while we lived there. I never saw a dark-skinned person on the island for the entire time we were there.
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  #13  
Old 09-14-2015, 10:46 PM
robert_columbia robert_columbia is offline
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Are there any countries today that have formal (legally enforced) exclusion policies based on race or ethnicity? I believe that there are some issues in the Middle East with respect to religion, but I was under the impression that the restrictions were based on religion and citizenship, not ethnicity or race per se. For example, a person of Jewish ancestry who has converted to Christianity or Islam and is traveling on a non-Israeli passport is unlikely to be blocked by "No Jews" policies.

If there are countries that do have such policies, how are they formally defined and adjudicated? For example, is it primarily based on appearance? DNA testing? Genealogical background checks? Names (E.g. whether your name appears on a defined list of "ethnic names")?

"Sorry, we ran a background check on you from the information in your Australian passport and we discovered that your great-great-great grandmother Josefina was born in a small town outside of Lisbon. You know our policy - 'No Portugee in Countree!' That's from the Combatting Dirty Portuguese Scum Border Protection Act 1995 you know. Entrance denied! Next!"

Last edited by robert_columbia; 09-14-2015 at 10:49 PM..
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  #14  
Old 09-14-2015, 11:24 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Did anyone else notice that this is a 15-year-old thread?
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  #15  
Old 09-15-2015, 12:24 AM
SandyHook SandyHook is offline
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Ms Hook and I were in Iceland this past May. I spent some time talking to a black buy working at a Levi's store. A very, very expensive Levi's store.
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  #16  
Old 09-15-2015, 01:12 AM
UDS UDS is offline
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Iceland is part of the European Economic Area, which assures (among other things) free movement of persons among member states of the Area, and of the EU. As a result, any EEA/EU national can live, work, study and retire in Iceland. Many EEA/EU nationals are black.

This has been so since 1994 so, even though the thread is 15 years old, the claim referred to in the OP was out of date when the thread started.

That's not to say that there might not have been considerable social prejudice against Black people in Iceland (or, indeed, against any immigrants); I can't say. But there was no effective legal barrier.
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  #17  
Old 09-15-2015, 03:11 AM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by handy View Post
Blacks couldn't own property in Pebble Beach for along time, a convenant said so. Dunno if they still have it, wouldn't surprise me.
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1948 that racial covenants are unconstitutional.
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  #18  
Old 09-15-2015, 05:32 AM
amanset amanset is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UDS View Post
Iceland is part of the European Economic Area, which assures (among other things) free movement of persons among member states of the Area, and of the EU.
Iceland is not a member of the EU.
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  #19  
Old 09-15-2015, 05:36 AM
mascaroni mascaroni is offline
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They even let Basques in these days. 400 years ago, three whaling ships were wrecked and eighty Basques were stranded in North West Iceland. After stealing food from the local farmers a decree was issued that any Basque should be killed on sight.

The Slaying of the Spaniards
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  #20  
Old 09-15-2015, 06:43 AM
Weirofhermiston Weirofhermiston is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amanset View Post
Iceland is not a member of the EU.
True, but it is a member of the European Free Trade Area. Membership requires it to observe the free movement arrangements that bind EU members.
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  #21  
Old 09-15-2015, 07:13 AM
amanset amanset is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weirofhermiston View Post
True, but it is a member of the European Free Trade Area. Membership requires it to observe the free movement arrangements that bind EU members.
I know, I was merely correcting an error in the statement in the spirit of the whole point behind this website.
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  #22  
Old 09-15-2015, 09:10 AM
Donnerwetter Donnerwetter is online now
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Let's take a look at the Icelandic Constitution:

Quote:
Article 65
Everyone shall be equal before the law and enjoy human rights irrespective of sex, religion, opinion, national origin, race, colour, property, birth or other status.

Men and women shall enjoy equal rights in all respects.
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  #23  
Old 09-15-2015, 09:39 AM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amanset View Post
I know, I was merely correcting an error in the statement in the spirit of the whole point behind this website.
No you weren't. Iceland is a member of the European Economic Area, which is exactly what UDS posted. The EEA consists of the EU and three of the four EFTA countries.
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  #24  
Old 09-15-2015, 10:04 AM
amanset amanset is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright View Post
No you weren't. Iceland is a member of the European Economic Area, which is exactly what UDS posted. The EEA consists of the EU and three of the four EFTA countries.
Reread what was written.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UDS View Post
Iceland is part of the European Economic Area, which assures (among other things) free movement of persons among member states of the Area, and of the EU.
Bolding mine to emphasise the statement, excluding the additional explanation of what the EEA provides.

And I can now see that this is going to boil down to a grammar/sentence structure argument. All I will say is that if UDS meant

Quote:
Iceland is part of the European Economic Area, which assures (among other things) free movement of persons among member states of the Area and of the EU.
Then that is what UDS should have written. But he/she didn't and in that case the "and of the EU" was not required as the entire EU is part of the EEA.
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  #25  
Old 09-15-2015, 10:19 AM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is online now
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You are misreading the sentence, which is admittedly not a model of clarity. The "of" in "of the EU" refers back to "member states of the area," not to "of the [EEA]".
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  #26  
Old 09-15-2015, 10:56 AM
amanset amanset is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright View Post
You are misreading the sentence, which is admittedly not a model of clarity. The "of" in "of the EU" refers back to "member states of the area," not to "of the [EEA]".
You are misreading it.
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  #27  
Old 09-15-2015, 01:15 PM
Doughbag Doughbag is offline
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Straight from wiki:
Quote:
The European Economic Area (EEA) provides for the free movement of persons, goods, services and capital within the internal market of the European Union (EU) between its 28 member states, as well as three of the four member states of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA): Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway.
Cite
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  #28  
Old 09-15-2015, 08:12 PM
UDS UDS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amanset View Post
You are misreading it.
His reading is not the one I intended, but I think that's more my fault than his. I constructed the sentence poorly.

Last edited by UDS; 09-15-2015 at 08:12 PM..
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  #29  
Old 09-15-2015, 11:42 PM
thelurkinghorror thelurkinghorror is offline
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Is it the EAA that is the deciding law/factor here, or the Schengen Area, which limits border controls? There is lots of overlap, but they're not 1:1. I have flown from a non-EU, Schengen country to a EU, non-Schengen country (Norway to UK) to the US and (IIRC) I had to go through immigration twice.
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  #30  
Old 09-15-2015, 11:47 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright View Post
You are misreading the sentence, which is admittedly not a model of clarity. The "of" in "of the EU" refers back to "member states of the area," not to "of the [EEA]".
Quote:
Originally Posted by amanset View Post
You are misreading it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by UDS View Post
His reading is not the one I intended, but I think that's more my fault than his. I constructed the sentence poorly.
[Moderating]

As long as the correct information has now been posted, I don't think it matters who misread what where when and how.

Colibri
General Questions Moderator
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  #31  
Old 09-16-2015, 12:05 AM
UDS UDS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thelurkinghorror View Post
Is it the EAA that is the deciding law/factor here, or the Schengen Area, which limits border controls? There is lots of overlap, but they're not 1:1. I have flown from a non-EU, Schengen country to a EU, non-Schengen country (Norway to UK) to the US and (IIRC) I had to go through immigration twice.
It's the EEA. Iceland is in the Schengen area, and a person travelling from (say) Germany to Iceland would not pass through any border controls. A person travelling to Iceland from the UK (which is not in the Schengen area) would pass through border controls but, if that person were an EEA/EU national, would be admitted to Iceland regardless of race or ethnicity.

The Schengen Area could be suspended tomorrow; an EEA/EU national would still enjoy the right of enty to Iceland to live, work, study, retire, etc. Whereas if the EEA were dissolved there would be no such right (plus, as a consequence, Iceland would have leave the Schengen Area).
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  #32  
Old 09-16-2015, 01:17 PM
MikeS MikeS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robert_columbia View Post
Are there any countries today that have formal (legally enforced) exclusion policies based on race or ethnicity? I believe that there are some issues in the Middle East with respect to religion, but I was under the impression that the restrictions were based on religion and citizenship, not ethnicity or race per se. For example, a person of Jewish ancestry who has converted to Christianity or Islam and is traveling on a non-Israeli passport is unlikely to be blocked by "No Jews" policies.

If there are countries that do have such policies, how are they formally defined and adjudicated? For example, is it primarily based on appearance? DNA testing? Genealogical background checks? Names (E.g. whether your name appears on a defined list of "ethnic names")?
There are some countries that still restrict citizenship along ethnic lines; the Rohingya refugee crisis in Myanmar is occurring because Burmese nationality law doesn't recognize members of this group as citizens. But this isn't quite the same as a racial exclusion policy.
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