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  #1  
Old 07-01-2002, 10:53 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Did Elvis Ever Write A Song?

Did the "King" ever write one of his own songs?

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Quasi
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  #2  
Old 07-01-2002, 11:35 AM
astorian astorian is offline
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Elvis shared songwriting credit on a few tunes, like "All SHook Up" and "Don't Be Cruel," but it's generally believed that he had nothing to do with writing them.

Remember that Elvis was in a very powerful position, as the most popular singer in rock and roll. If a young, unknown songwriter like Otis Blackwell (the REAL composer of the two songs I mentioned earlier) wanted Elvis to record one of his songs, Colonel Tom Parker could lean on that songwriter to share songwriting credit with Elvis. That meant, of course, that Elvis collected a share of the songwriting royalties.

MANY early rock songwriters were forced to share credit with all kinds of powerful people who were in a position to help them out. For example, deejay Allen Freed demanded co-writing credit for "Maybelline" in exchange for playing Chuck Berry's music on the radio. In reality, of course, Freed didn't have anything to do with writing "Maybelline." But Berry was desperate for radio airplay, so he gave Freed partial credit, and Freed earned a fortune in royalties as a result.
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  #3  
Old 07-01-2002, 06:31 PM
WSLer WSLer is offline
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Elvis got songwriting credit for Love Me Tender, but he had nothing to do with writing that song or any of the others that he sang.

Elvis didn't get songwriting credit as much as he got the publishing rights. Col, Parker wouldn't let Elvis record a song unless the songwriter signed the publishing rights over to one of two publishing companies that the Col had set up. This sytem eventually backfired as many good songwriters refused to do this and Elvis was reduced to singing suchclassics as "Do The Clam," and "Old MacDonald Had A Farm."
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  #4  
Old 07-01-2002, 08:56 PM
K364 K364 is offline
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Some trivia - "Love Me Tender" has writting credits for Elvis Presley and Ken Darby [billed as Vera Matson] but actually it is an adaptation of the Civil War melody "Aura Lee".
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  #5  
Old 07-03-2002, 04:27 PM
wikkidpis wikkidpis is offline
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Elvis shared a writer's credit for "Heartbreak Hotel", his 1st single recorded after Sun sold him to RCA. When asked about it by a reporter, Elvis said "I never wrote a song in my life". And that's what he always said when asked. The Colonal just got him some writer's credits to get both of them some money honey (the colonal took 50% of everything Elvis earned). But Elvis was always honest about it.
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  #6  
Old 10-21-2012, 05:23 AM
foodsexmusic foodsexmusic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astorian View Post
Elvis shared songwriting credit on a few tunes, like "All SHook Up" and "Don't Be Cruel," but it's generally believed that he had nothing to do with writing them.

Remember that Elvis was in a very powerful position, as the most popular singer in rock and roll. If a young, unknown songwriter like Otis Blackwell (the REAL composer of the two songs I mentioned earlier) wanted Elvis to record one of his songs, Colonel Tom Parker could lean on that songwriter to share songwriting credit with Elvis. That meant, of course, that Elvis collected a share of the songwriting royalties.

MANY early rock songwriters were forced to share credit with all kinds of powerful people who were in a position to help them out. For example, deejay Allen Freed demanded co-writing credit for "Maybelline" in exchange for playing Chuck Berry's music on the radio. In reality, of course, Freed didn't have anything to do with writing "Maybelline." But Berry was desperate for radio airplay, so he gave Freed partial credit, and Freed earned a fortune in royalties as a result.
Does this mean that Allen Freed and Elvis pretended that they wrote the songs
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  #7  
Old 10-21-2012, 07:15 AM
astorian astorian is offline
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Originally Posted by foodsexmusic View Post
Does this mean that Allen Freed and Elvis pretended that they wrote the songs
"We pretend to write the songs that make the whole woooorld siiiiing....."
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  #8  
Old 10-21-2012, 07:24 AM
mutantmoose mutantmoose is offline
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He co-wrote two with his bodyguard Red West - You'll Be Gone and That's Someone You Never Forget.
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  #9  
Old 10-21-2012, 11:11 AM
Exapno Mapcase Exapno Mapcase is offline
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Nice find.
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  #10  
Old 10-21-2012, 01:17 PM
Lochdale Lochdale is offline
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He never really made an effort at songwriting but was a genius at composition and production (according to many including Phil Spector). Getting Elvis to sing one of your songs almost guaranteed a hit. Even the complete crap he sung for the movies (with one or two exceptions) did ok.

Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller loved working with Elvis and never reported any issues on credit.
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  #11  
Old 10-21-2012, 01:52 PM
Mister Rik Mister Rik is offline
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ISTR Dolly Parton saying that one of the best decisions she ever made was telling Elvis (and/or Colonel Parker) "no" when Elvis wanted to record "I Will Always Love You" and wanted the songwriting credit.
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  #12  
Old 10-21-2012, 05:15 PM
Revtim Revtim is offline
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Originally Posted by mutantmoose View Post
He co-wrote two with his bodyguard Red West - You'll Be Gone and That's Someone You Never Forget.
Eh, he just stole the idea of writing songs from black artists.
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  #13  
Old 10-21-2012, 06:40 PM
Lochdale Lochdale is offline
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Originally Posted by Revtim View Post
Eh, he just stole the idea of writing songs from black artists.
Yea because all his songs were written by blacks. Oh right, they weren't. Also he didn't steal anything from anyone. A basic effort would point that out to you.

Apparently Parker demanded 50% of the royalties. He could because Elvis made everyone money. Fair play to her for saying no.

Last edited by Lochdale; 10-21-2012 at 06:42 PM..
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  #14  
Old 10-21-2012, 06:57 PM
Revtim Revtim is offline
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It's called a joke son.
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  #15  
Old 10-21-2012, 10:50 PM
PlainJain PlainJain is offline
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Originally Posted by K364 View Post
Some trivia - "Love Me Tender" has writting credits for Elvis Presley and Ken Darby [billed as Vera Matson] but actually it is an adaptation of the Civil War melody "Aura Lee".
When asked why he granted his wife with songwriting credits Darby replied, "because she didn't have anything to do with the writing either".
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  #16  
Old 10-22-2012, 01:06 AM
Lochdale Lochdale is offline
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Originally Posted by Revtim View Post
It's called a joke son.
Whoosh! Apologies, totally missed it.
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  #17  
Old 10-22-2012, 01:08 AM
Lochdale Lochdale is offline
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Originally Posted by PlainJain View Post
When asked why he granted his wife with songwriting credits Darby replied, "because she didn't have anything to do with the writing either".
Curious about that as he made a fortune with the song. Cite?
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  #18  
Old 10-22-2012, 01:13 AM
etv78 etv78 is offline
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I'm MORE curious why a 10 year old zombie was animated.
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  #19  
Old 10-22-2012, 01:14 AM
Lochdale Lochdale is offline
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Originally Posted by etv78 View Post
I'm MORE curious why a 10 year old zombie was animated.
Didn't even notice, doh!

Last edited by Lochdale; 10-22-2012 at 01:15 AM..
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  #20  
Old 10-23-2012, 01:37 AM
PlainJain PlainJain is offline
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Originally Posted by Lochdale View Post
Curious about that as he made a fortune with the song. Cite?
I saw it on a TV special about Elvis. IIRC they had a clip of him saying it.
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  #21  
Old 10-23-2012, 03:56 PM
ministryman ministryman is offline
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Originally Posted by Lochdale View Post
Didn't even notice, doh!
It's because Elvis, and hence his zombies, LIVES!
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  #22  
Old 10-24-2012, 12:06 AM
Lochdale Lochdale is offline
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Originally Posted by PlainJain View Post
I saw it on a TV special about Elvis. IIRC they had a clip of him saying it.
Can you recall which one? I've seen most of them and I don't remember this.
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  #23  
Old 10-24-2012, 12:07 AM
Lochdale Lochdale is offline
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Originally Posted by ministryman View Post
It's because Elvis, and hence his zombies, LIVES!
That suggests Elvis died which we all know is ridiculous.
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  #24  
Old 10-24-2012, 04:27 PM
A Dodgy Dude A Dodgy Dude is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Rik View Post
ISTR Dolly Parton saying that one of the best decisions she ever made was telling Elvis (and/or Colonel Parker) "no" when Elvis wanted to record "I Will Always Love You" and wanted the songwriting credit.
It wasn't the songwriting credit the Colonel demanded it was the publishing rights. The Elvis bio by Peter Guralnick goes into this stuff at length.
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  #25  
Old 10-24-2012, 04:31 PM
astorian astorian is offline
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Originally Posted by A Dodgy Dude View Post
It wasn't the songwriting credit the Colonel demanded it was the publishing rights. The Elvis bio by Peter Guralnick goes into this stuff at length.
The Colonel ALWAYS demanded publishing rights,but as Otis Blackwell can attest, he also demanded songwriting credit when he thought he had enough leverage.
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  #26  
Old 10-24-2012, 04:51 PM
Mister Rik Mister Rik is offline
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Originally Posted by A Dodgy Dude View Post
It wasn't the songwriting credit the Colonel demanded it was the publishing rights. The Elvis bio by Peter Guralnick goes into this stuff at length.
Thanks for the correction; I didn't have the quote at-hand so was going from memory
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  #27  
Old 10-25-2012, 08:54 AM
Lochdale Lochdale is offline
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Parker was a huckster at the best of times but in his defense on this one having a Elvis sing a song was a near sure fire hit. As such, everyone made money (except for Elvis who had a incredibly poor, one-sided deal with Parker).

Say what you want about Priscilla but after Elvis' death she cleaned up the mess Parker had created.

Last edited by Lochdale; 10-25-2012 at 08:56 AM..
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  #28  
Old 10-25-2012, 09:26 AM
astorian astorian is offline
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Originally Posted by Lochdale View Post
Parker was a huckster at the best of times but in his defense on this one having a Elvis sing a song was a near sure fire hit. As such, everyone made money (except for Elvis who had a incredibly poor, one-sided deal with Parker).

Oh, I'm sure Otis Blackwell figured, "50% of the royalties from a smash hit by Elvis is waaaaay more money than 100% of the royalties to a song nobody will ever hear." It may have made good business sense to give Elvis undeserved credit fr co-writing "All Shook Up."

In the same way, Johnny Carson made Paul Anka agree to share composing credit for the "Tonight" theme music, even though Carson had nothing to do with writing it. Anka undoubtedly reasoned that HALF of a fortune was better than ALL of nothing. And by the time Carson retired, Anka, says, royalties for that theme music alone were worth about $800,000 a year.

Last edited by astorian; 10-25-2012 at 09:28 AM..
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  #29  
Old 10-25-2012, 11:33 PM
Lochdale Lochdale is offline
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Wow 800k a year!!

A lot of songwriters sought Presley out because he made them money. The criticism of Presley not writing his own songs is silly. He interpreted them like no one else and he was an entertainer who was enormously successful. He never stole any music like many others he just performed and everyone won.
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  #30  
Old 10-26-2012, 09:28 AM
C. Montgomery Burns C. Montgomery Burns is offline
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It was pretty common for pre-Beatles popular singers to not write their own songs. One of the things that made the Beatles unique was that they did write the majority of their own songs. Then other artist decided it was a good idea, until it became the norm.
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  #31  
Old 10-26-2012, 09:55 AM
Skywatcher Skywatcher is offline
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Originally Posted by Lochdale View Post
That suggests Elvis died which we all know is ridiculous.
Right. He went home!
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