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  #1  
Old 06-30-2003, 09:52 PM
caveman caveman is offline
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In the same vain or vein?

"In the same vein"

"In the same vain"

Which is the correct form of this transitional phrase?
(search turned up nada)

Bonus points for cites!
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  #2  
Old 06-30-2003, 10:05 PM
Ringo Ringo is offline
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The expression is properly "in the same vein." The definition of vein as given here is:

Quote:
"(1) Rib supporting an insect wing; (2) vessel carrying blood from capillaries toward the heart; (3) conduit for fluid in a leaf."(B79 - Animalia (Animals) / Plantae (Plants) associated terms)
I believe the usage in the expression would come from parts 2 and 3 above, where the vein is a pathway, the idea being that the thought being introduced by the expression "in the same vein" takes the same or a similar pathway as the referenced idea. I can't imagine how "vain" would be worked into the usage.
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  #3  
Old 06-30-2003, 10:19 PM
Jimmy Chitwood Jimmy Chitwood is offline
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Vein.
Quote:
c. in the vein, in a fit or suitable mood for something.
Link- section 14 c., way down near the bottom.
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  #4  
Old 06-30-2003, 10:29 PM
Kamino Neko Kamino Neko is offline
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It's vein. As to an explaination, definitions 4 and 5 for Vein here might fit better than the 3 from Ringo's link:

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=vein

Quote:
4. Geology. A regularly shaped and lengthy occurrence of an ore; a lode.
5. A long wavy strip of a different shade or color, as in wood or marble, or as mold in cheese
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  #5  
Old 06-30-2003, 10:36 PM
Ringo Ringo is offline
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It might at that. Nevertheless, the idea with a blood vessel, a conduit, a lengthy occurence or a long strip is one of connection.
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  #6  
Old 06-30-2003, 10:53 PM
Ringo Ringo is offline
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And I'll note that a google search on both phrases turns up quite a few "vain" usages, none of which make much sense. I suppose, maybe, if you were comparing a couple of prima donnas...
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  #7  
Old 06-30-2003, 10:54 PM
Boyo Jim Boyo Jim is offline
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vein, no question in my pointy head about it.
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  #8  
Old 06-30-2003, 10:56 PM
Dr_Paprika Dr_Paprika is offline
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Vein.

I thought it always came form the mining definition... along with the golds and diamonds and what have you...
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  #9  
Old 07-01-2003, 06:53 AM
refusal refusal is offline
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A useful resource for this sort of question is the Collins Cobuild Concordance, a searchable database of English sentences used as the basis of their dictionaries: search it for "in the same vein|vain" to match both forms, and it has nearly 20 uses of "vein" and none of "vain".
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  #10  
Old 07-01-2003, 07:10 AM
hammos1 hammos1 is offline
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Case closed- can we deal with 'For all intensive purposes' now?
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  #11  
Old 07-01-2003, 07:12 AM
Who_me? Who_me? is offline
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You mean, "For all intents and purposes"?
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  #12  
Old 07-01-2003, 07:20 AM
WILLASS WILLASS is offline
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buck naked or butt naked? I always thought the latter but a lot of people use the former.
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  #13  
Old 07-01-2003, 07:24 AM
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vain isn't even a noun! Oh, who am I kidding, I've no idea where the phrase comes from, I just assumed it was vein.
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  #14  
Old 09-14-2010, 09:49 PM
czerwins@sbcglobal.net czerwins@sbcglobal.net is offline
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vain vein vane

http://www.grammar-monster.com/easil..._vein_vane.htm

(1) A vein is a blood vessel or a distinctive style.
(2) Vain means 'self admiring' or 'futile'. The term 'in vain' means 'without success'.
(3) A vane is a stabilizing fin or blade.
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  #15  
Old 09-14-2010, 10:36 PM
Shmendrik Shmendrik is offline
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Since this zombie has risen from the grave, it's worth pointing out that Google gives 13M results for vein vs 270K results for vain. Either the OP didn't do a very good job of searching, or we are witnessing the march of progress before our very eyes.
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  #16  
Old 09-15-2010, 09:54 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILLASS View Post
buck naked or butt naked? I always thought the latter but a lot of people use the former.
I'm 63 and only heard or used the term "buck naked" since childhood. The internet is full of speculation as to where the term came from, including that it may have originally morphed from "butt naked", which doesn't seem likely. I never heard "butt naked" until recent years.


Ah crap, I'm talking to a zombie.

Last edited by Chefguy; 09-15-2010 at 09:54 AM..
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  #17  
Old 09-15-2010, 10:14 AM
Candyman74 Candyman74 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILLASS View Post
buck naked or butt naked? I always thought the latter but a lot of people use the former.
You are correct, at least in my neck of the woods. I've never heard "buck naked" before.

Last edited by Candyman74; 09-15-2010 at 10:14 AM..
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  #18  
Old 09-15-2010, 10:32 AM
Darth Panda Darth Panda is offline
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Naked zombies!!!
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  #19  
Old 09-15-2010, 10:40 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Candyman74 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILLASS View Post
buck naked or butt naked? I always thought the latter but a lot of people use the former.
You are correct, at least in my neck of the woods. I've never heard "buck naked" before.
The original form (and still the correct one, at least here in the UK) is "buck naked". It seems to have mutated in recent years, in the same way that "off your own bat" is often mangled into "off your own back".
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  #20  
Old 09-15-2010, 11:01 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Candyman74 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILLASS View Post
buck naked or butt naked? I always thought the latter but a lot of people use the former.
You are correct, at least in my neck of the woods. I've never heard "buck naked" before.
Am I correct that in your neck of the woods, they also say "nekkid"?
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  #21  
Old 09-15-2010, 12:54 PM
Candyman74 Candyman74 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post

Am I correct that in your neck of the woods, they also say "nekkid"?
Eh?
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  #22  
Old 09-15-2010, 03:41 PM
The Great Sun Jester The Great Sun Jester is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
The original form (and still the correct one, at least here in the UK) is "buck naked". It seems to have mutated in recent years, in the same way that "off your own bat" is often mangled into "off your own back".
What does this phrase even mean? Did Brits frequently own carrier bats to deliver messages to one another? So taking one person's idea for your own would be met with the derisive comment, "You clearly didn't develop that proposal off you your own bat"--meaning "You've been intercepting other peoples' carrier bats and reading the messages!"

Brits are weird.
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  #23  
Old 09-15-2010, 03:46 PM
Candyman74 Candyman74 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inigo Montoya View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
The original form (and still the correct one, at least here in the UK) is "buck naked". It seems to have mutated in recent years, in the same way that "off your own bat" is often mangled into "off your own back".
What does this phrase even mean? Did Brits frequently own carrier bats to deliver messages to one another? So taking one person's idea for your own would be met with the derisive comment, "You clearly didn't develop that proposal off you your own bat"--meaning "You've been intercepting other peoples' carrier bats and reading the messages!"

Brits are weird.
Cricket bat. But I'm sure you guessed that.

Last edited by Candyman74; 09-15-2010 at 03:47 PM..
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  #24  
Old 09-15-2010, 03:59 PM
Looey Looey is offline
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I wish I could remember the comedian's name who described the difference between naked and nekkid.

Naked means y'ain't got no clothes on. Nekkid means y'ain't got no clothes on... and yer up to somethin'!
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  #25  
Old 09-15-2010, 04:05 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Candyman74 View Post
... I've never heard "buck naked" before.
You've got to be kidding. It's George Costanza's porn name!
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  #26  
Old 09-16-2012, 06:00 AM
jepflast jepflast is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Looey View Post
I wish I could remember the comedian's name who described the difference between naked and nekkid.

Naked means y'ain't got no clothes on. Nekkid means y'ain't got no clothes on... and yer up to somethin'!
It was Jeff Foxworthy, and it's the other way around: nekkid is simple nudity.

In other news, "buck naked" is the original and "butt naked" is a later misrendering.

Actually I just stopped by to see why this thread had 47,000 views. I still don't know.
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  #27  
Old 09-16-2012, 06:20 AM
saje saje is offline
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And this is the second time it's bee resurrected.
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  #28  
Old 09-16-2012, 08:40 AM
Cub Mistress Cub Mistress is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Looey View Post
I wish I could remember the comedian's name who described the difference between naked and nekkid.

Naked means y'ain't got no clothes on. Nekkid means y'ain't got no clothes on... and yer up to somethin'!
Quote:
Originally Posted by jepflast View Post
It was Jeff Foxworthy, and it's the other way around: nekkid is simple nudity.

In other news, "buck naked" is the original and "butt naked" is a later misrendering.

Actually I just stopped by to see why this thread had 47,000 views. I still don't know.

Lewis Grizzard
, actually. Looey had it the right way 'round.
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  #29  
Old 09-16-2012, 09:59 AM
johnpost johnpost is offline
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double zombie or no

nekkid is in the same vein as naked.
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  #30  
Old 09-16-2012, 10:11 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ringo View Post
And I'll note that a google search on both phrases turns up quite a few "vain" usages, none of which make much sense. I suppose, maybe, if you were comparing a couple of prima donnas...
Or, as one of my employees wrote, a pre madonna. I guess that would have been Cher.

Goddamn it, suckered into the same zombie thread....again!

Last edited by Chefguy; 09-16-2012 at 10:13 AM..
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  #31  
Old 09-16-2012, 10:19 AM
johnpost johnpost is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Ah crap, I'm talking to a zombie.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Goddamn it, suckered into the same zombie thread....again!
are both in the same vein.
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  #32  
Old 09-16-2012, 12:26 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpost View Post
are both in the same vein.
AAAUUUUUGGHHHH!! ::falls on floor in a Belushi fit::
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  #33  
Old 09-16-2012, 01:48 PM
Kenm Kenm is offline
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"Humor in a jugular vein" — Mad
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  #34  
Old 09-16-2012, 02:29 PM
rsat3acr rsat3acr is offline
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Originally Posted by Kenm View Post
"Humor in a jugular vein" Mad
man that brings back memories
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  #35  
Old 09-16-2012, 03:45 PM
John Mace John Mace is offline
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I never saw this coming down the pipe.
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  #36  
Old 10-04-2013, 04:18 PM
Bilbo Baggins Bilbo Baggins is offline
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In the Same Vein

Dr. Paprika wins! (See his post in 2003).

The actual first use in literature of "in the same vein" is indeed an American mining expression.

To wit, in underground rock layers gold is found running in veins. So is silver. Sometimes there will be a slight admixture.

Thus, the miner's query, "Is it gold?" answered by, "I don't know, but it is running in the same vein."
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  #37  
Old 10-04-2013, 04:57 PM
Munch Munch is offline
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Triple zombie!
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  #38  
Old 10-04-2013, 07:04 PM
Musicat Musicat is offline
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Originally Posted by Munch View Post
Triple zombie!
I'm afraid, Sir, that your exclaimed protest is in vain.
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  #39  
Old 10-05-2013, 03:10 AM
naita naita is offline
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Originally Posted by Bilbo Baggins View Post
Dr. Paprika wins! (See his post in 2003).

The actual first use in literature of "in the same vein" is indeed an American mining expression.
Cite?
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  #40  
Old 10-05-2013, 05:14 AM
Patty O'Furniture Patty O'Furniture is offline
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Veinnnnnns!
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  #41  
Old 10-05-2013, 01:24 PM
ZenBeam ZenBeam is offline
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Triple zombie!
Where's Chefguy?
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  #42  
Old 10-06-2013, 05:36 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Where's Chefguy?
Why aorta. . .
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  #43  
Old 10-08-2013, 10:17 AM
born too late born too late is offline
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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Why aorta. . .
You really should of.

It really greats on my nerves when people have problems with homophones.
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