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  #1  
Old 12-26-2003, 01:08 PM
stpauler stpauler is offline
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Should I wash my new sheets?

I just bought some new flannel sheets and the package says to wash before using. Is there any reason to do this considering that they're new sheets?
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  #2  
Old 12-26-2003, 01:12 PM
KSO KSO is offline
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Maybe there's some sort of rinse that's used in the manufacturing/packaging process? I dunno, I always wash new sheets, etc. before using--you don't REALLY know what they've come in contact with.
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Old 12-26-2003, 01:13 PM
Uvula Donor Uvula Donor is offline
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New fabric usually contains "sizing" - kind of a starch that stiffens the fabric and makes it easier to work with. Some people complain of an allergic reaction to it, so manufacturers recommend washing before using.

Personally, I don't usually wash new clothes or sheets before using them for the first time; the sizing doesn't bother me.
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Old 12-26-2003, 01:38 PM
Queen Tonya Queen Tonya is offline
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Hmm, never really thought about it, but I'll wear new clothing without washing first, sheets automatically go thru the laundry before they hit the bed. Flannel sheets don't feel all warm and fuzzy until they've been washed, must be the sizing stuff.

Wash them first, and then you get the bonus of your bed smelling all clean and April fresh.
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  #5  
Old 12-26-2003, 01:48 PM
butler1850 butler1850 is offline
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We always wash new sheets before we sleep on them, especially things made of cotton, and ALWAYS for flannel.

In the case of flannel, it softens them up a bit, which is the real reason for getting flannel sheets to start with.

The other reason would be to get rid of any dyes that may rub off on us, rather than into the waste water (we wash them all by them selves)
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  #6  
Old 12-26-2003, 02:49 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Yup. And in the case of flannel, depending on the quality, don't lay any dark sweaters on the unmade bed if you're in a hurry to get to work.

God I love getting into my flannel sheets on these cold mornings. Sierra Trading Post has them cheap. Best thing I bought myself all year!

Q
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  #7  
Old 12-26-2003, 04:24 PM
Snuggles Snuggles is offline
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I never wash new sheets or clothes before I wear them. I suppose I should though.
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  #8  
Old 12-26-2003, 05:15 PM
Athena Athena is online now
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I've purchased at least one set of flannel sheets that was HUUUGE until it was washed. Being 100% cotton, they sized big so that the shrinkage when you washed it wouldn't make it too small.
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Old 12-26-2003, 05:33 PM
Lsura Lsura is online now
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New clothes/sheets/fabric items may be treated with spot cleaner or other chemicals in the manufacturing plant before being packaged for shipping. These chemicals can be fairly harsh (the people working with them in the sewing plants have to wear masks and gloves*), and I don't want to end up with a reaction to them. So I wash sheets, towels, clothes, whatever before I wear them.

There may also be spills in distribution centers or they may have people come in and spray for bugs. Residue can be on the fabric.



*I used to work for a clothing manufacturer and traveled to various plants and distribution centers so I saw the protection that was used. If necessary, I can probably find a cite.
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Old 12-26-2003, 09:35 PM
EddyTeddyFreddy EddyTeddyFreddy is offline
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I've made the mistake of putting new, unwashed sheets on my bed, and woke up with rashes on my bare arms, especially the elbows. Whether it was chemicals, or friction from the stiffness of the new sheets, I don't know, but it never happens when I wash them first. Whether they're flannel, cotton, or synthetic, washing them softens them to be much more comfortable, at least to me.
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Old 12-27-2003, 12:32 AM
Geoduck Geoduck is offline
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Some color may also transfer to other fabrics. They get softer after the first washing anyway. We always wash new clothing and sheets.
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  #12  
Old 12-27-2003, 12:35 AM
BuckleberryFerry BuckleberryFerry is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Quasimodem
Yup. And in the case of flannel, depending on the quality, don't lay any dark sweaters on the unmade bed if you're in a hurry to get to work.
How come? Would the fuzz stick to the sweater, or is there some other tragedy that I'm not comprehending?
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  #13  
Old 12-27-2003, 10:02 AM
geewhiz geewhiz is offline
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Fuzziness from the flannel will stick to the sweater and then you will have to spend an hour cussing and picking it off.

I am not particularly sensitive to dyes or anything like that but if you are, wash the sheets.

I do it because it makes them softer and they smell mountain fresh.

If dye is transferring off sheets you might want to take them back. What is the brand name so we can all avoid that brand from now on.
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