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  #1  
Old 06-17-2004, 09:31 PM
rookie523 rookie523 is offline
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grandfather in Filipino?

Hi,

I have to get a father's day card for a daycare student...
but she doesn't have a father... she does have a grandfather.

but i need to put on the card, "grandfather" in filipino.

can someone help out with this?

thx!
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  #2  
Old 06-17-2004, 10:00 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Link

Search engines are your friends.
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  #3  
Old 06-17-2004, 10:06 PM
rookie523 rookie523 is offline
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thx!!

i tried "grandfather filipino language"
grandfather translated into filipino

and it wasn't the first 3 pages...
just got info on people writing about those words..
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Old 06-17-2004, 10:32 PM
Vision of Love Vision of Love is offline
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Lolo.
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  #5  
Old 06-18-2004, 02:47 AM
sturmhauke sturmhauke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rookie523
thx!!

i tried "grandfather filipino language"
grandfather translated into filipino

and it wasn't the first 3 pages...
just got info on people writing about those words..
Weird. I was gonna say that "Filipino" wasn't a language, because that's what my family says (I'm half Filipino). But I went and looked anyway, and it seems I'm wrong.
Quote:
Two official languages --- Filipino and English. Filipino which is based on Tagalog, is the national language. English is also widely used and is the medium of instruction in higher education.

Eight (8) major dialects spoken by majority of the Filipinos: Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilocano, Hiligaynon or Ilonggo, Bicol, Waray, Pampango, and Pangasinense.
I was always told that there isn't a language called Filipino, so I ran a Google search and discovered that it's a matter of some contention, or at least was at one time.
Quote:
from The Metamorphosis of Filipino as National Language:

In 1937, the [National Language] Institute recommended Tagalog and came up with the Balarila and the Tagalog- English Dictionary. In 1959, the Department of Education called the Tagalog-based national language Pilipino. In
1965, some congressmen took the cudgels againsts the propagation of Pilipino, which to them is "puristang Tagalog," as the national language. This period witnessed the purists coining words like salumpuwit (chair), salimpapaw (airplane), sipnayan (mathematics), etc... Be that as it may, the Board of National Education ordered in 1970 the gradual shift to Pilipino as medium of instruction...
My dad's family came over in the 60s, so I guess they subscribed to the purist movement.
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  #6  
Old 06-18-2004, 10:37 AM
gambler gambler is offline
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All my filipino friends say that their language is Tagalog. And no, they're not all related (so they tell me). My friends mom and her family were raised on Ilocano, but they still say that the national language is Tagalog. Maybe they say that to lessen confusion.
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  #7  
Old 06-18-2004, 02:37 PM
Vision of Love Vision of Love is offline
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The national language is Filipino, but there are many different dialects of it. Because many of these dialects differ from one another, most Filipinos treat them all as separate languages.

Because Tagalog is the most often used Filipino dialect, some people call it the Filipino language.

My dad speaks three different dialects of Filipino: Tagalog, Bisaya, and Maranao (his mother tongue). I only understand Tagalog. The other two sound almost completely foreign to me.
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  #8  
Old 01-04-2012, 06:06 PM
GovernmentMan GovernmentMan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision of Love View Post
The national language is Filipino, but there are many different dialects of it. Because many of these dialects differ from one another, most Filipinos treat them all as separate languages.

Because Tagalog is the most often used Filipino dialect, some people call it the Filipino language.

My dad speaks three different dialects of Filipino: Tagalog, Bisaya, and Maranao (his mother tongue). I only understand Tagalog. The other two sound almost completely foreign to me.
That's because they're not dialects of Filipino. That's a universal misconception among Filipinos
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