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  #1  
Old 03-15-2005, 03:58 PM
The Unkempt One The Unkempt One is offline
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How much do TV actors get paid in royalties?

Every year or two we hear about stars of the most popular sitcoms getting paid millions of dollars for every episode they are in. However, I have often wondered how much these actors get paid in royalties once the original episodes of their show are no longer airing. With so many sitcoms such as Friends and Cheers running on so many different channels, I assume that the actors in these shows are still getting paid pretty well. However, this is an assumption on my part, since I have not been able to find any figures for how much is paid out in royalties to these actors.

Is there a standard royalty amount that is paid to actors? Are they negotiated at the time the series is being produced? Or, are they negotiated when the reruns start airing? I would also assume that the bigger stars of sitcoms are paid more in royalties than the lesser characters, but again, this is an assumption.

So, how much are Ted Danson, Alan Alda, and their fellow tv actors making from their respective shows these days?
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  #2  
Old 03-15-2005, 04:11 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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IIRC, the current SAG/AFTRA contract only gives actors residuals on the first rerun. After that, they get nothing unless they have a sweetheart contract with the network.

Look here www.aftra.org/contract/documents/Referendum.pps for details of the current contract.
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  #3  
Old 03-15-2005, 04:23 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
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Can't answer your question, except to say that the correct term is residuals
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Old 03-15-2005, 04:33 PM
zamboniracer zamboniracer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus
IIRC, the current SAG/AFTRA contract only gives actors residuals on the first rerun. After that, they get nothing unless they have a sweetheart contract with the network.

Look here www.aftra.org/contract/documents/Referendum.pps for details of the current contract.


Wow, is that a fact. I had just kind of assumed that the guy who played Mr. Belding on "Saved by the Bell", and all his extended family, was set for life since that show has been played on reruns on TBS for at least 20 years.
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Old 03-15-2005, 04:40 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Why do you think the producers all want their shows to get 100 episodes in the can? Because that's the magic number for syndication, and that money is pure profit for the studios. No residuals to pay, just rake in the dough.
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  #6  
Old 03-15-2005, 05:16 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zamboniracer
Wow, is that a fact. I had just kind of assumed that the guy who played Mr. Belding on "Saved by the Bell", and all his extended family, was set for life since that show has been played on reruns on TBS for at least 20 years.
I'm waiting for the link to the current contract to load, but that's not the way it used to be. The basic SAG contract got you residuals on each showing, on a sliding scale based on the number of times the show ran. Residuals from commercials were based on the markets it ran in, with a fixed rate for cable. Names could negotiate better. Last year my daughter made a couple of hundred bucks on a show she did four episodes of in 1995 that was in reruns on Noggin. So, Mr. Belding is probably doing okay.
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  #7  
Old 03-15-2005, 05:28 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus
IIRC, the current SAG/AFTRA contract only gives actors residuals on the first rerun. After that, they get nothing unless they have a sweetheart contract with the network.

Look here www.aftra.org/contract/documents/Referendum.pps for details of the current contract.
You misunderstand that presentation. Typically, residual rates are quoted for the first rerun, with subsequent reruns paying at a sliding scale. Here is an anti-contract page. A change to residuals on the first rerun only would be a revolutionary change - you'd be hearing the screams all over the world, and no SAG leadership would survive. The change is that they are not giving residuals to series players if the show repeats almost immediately. In the old mode a rerun would happen over the summer or when the show went into syndication, now they repeat the same week, or perhaps on a cable station.

BTW, the third bullet in slide 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAG
Work in Tobacco Smoke to the Industry Union Safety Committee
might be confusing. It does not mean people are working in tobacco smoke. Smoke work means any kind of dangerous work. Someone sliding down a ramp would be considered smoke. This means that working around lit cigarettes is now considered smoke work. You get extra money for smoke work, and there are stringent safety precautions.
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  #8  
Old 03-15-2005, 05:33 PM
Mr. Blue Sky Mr. Blue Sky is offline
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I know the cast of Star Trek:TNG negotiated one heckuva contarct when they went to the 7th season. They got a sliding scale based on the number of times the show was sold into syndication, the number of tapes, laserdiscs (hey, this was the early 90s), and any other format that might come along.
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  #9  
Old 03-15-2005, 05:33 PM
MovieMogul MovieMogul is offline
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Here's an answer. Excerpt:
Quote:
Under the Screen Actors Guild collective bargaining agreement, each performer is entitled to a percentage of their initial pay for each rerun. The amount starts at 100 percent for network reruns and about half that amount for non-prime-time syndication reruns.

These rerun payments are subject to a ceiling of less than $3,000 for a half-hour show and less than $4,000 for a one-hour show. (So, if you're Matt LeBlanc making some $1 million nonsense per episode, you'll get max $3,000 on a rerun, says Bernstein.) In reality, however, most of your scrub actors get residual payments in the hundreds, not the thousands. Some actors have even reported getting residual checks for just a few pennies.
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  #10  
Old 03-15-2005, 05:46 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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I've heard Vicky Lawrence say that her residuals for Mama's Family were something like $100 per month- not much at all. In a recent interview with the very bitter actor Kevin Hagen (best known as Doc Baker on Little House on the Prairie) he said he receives about $8 per week (but then he never had a contract- he said that if he'd had a contract instead of being pay for play he'd have earned well over $1 million since the show's demise [which was the point of the article, a 'Michael Landon was a greedy scumbucket' rant]).

Some residuals trivia:

Jack Klugman & Tony Randall both earned much much more from residuals than from the series The Odd Couple. Ditto Werner "Col. Klink" Klemperer, and Bob Crane died very strapped for cash but had he lived a few more years he'd have earned millions as his residuals actually increased [I think he owned a part of the show, which is where the real money is). (I don't think the producers realized quite how much money was in syndication during the late 60s and early 70s and thus they signed away more than they would today to moderately successful stars.)

Redd Foxx, who had a lifelong history of really bad business practices, signed over his residuals to Sanford & Son in a divorce settlement rather than pay his wife something like $800,000 and consequently he died penniless and she is still raking it in.

In the 1990s Audrey Meadows was still receiving residuals from The Honeymooners. She was the only member of the cast to have demanded them during contract negotiation.

None of the children from The Brady Bunch and none of the castaways from Gilligan's Island received residuals after the third repeat. Carol (Florence Henderson), Alice (Ann B. Davis) and the estate of Mike (Robert Reed) still receive them however; the kids got royally screwed by their management evidently.
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  #11  
Old 03-15-2005, 05:50 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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Many actors sell their residuals incidentally to intellectual property brokers (just like publishing rights to songs and copyrights to manuscripts). Sally Struthers is one who did this- it was profitable for the buyer but she should have held out for more (though luckily she knows some people who can feed her for just pennies a day).
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  #12  
Old 03-15-2005, 05:59 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArchiveGuy
Some actors have even reported getting residual checks for just a few pennies.
True. My daughter got a check for 16 cents when an episode of a soap she was an extra in ran in Italy.

The reason you have a manager is so he or she can yell at SAG about where your money is, and knows how much you are supposed to get. SAG has a big office in LA (across from the La Brea tar pits, I believe) handling this.
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  #13  
Old 02-29-2012, 07:23 AM
fliflito fliflito is offline
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Originally Posted by Sampiro View Post
I've heard Vicky Lawrence say that her residuals for Mama's Family were something like $100 per month- not much at all. In a recent interview with the very bitter actor Kevin Hagen (best known as Doc Baker on Little House on the Prairie) he said he receives about $8 per week (but then he never had a contract- he said that if he'd had a contract instead of being pay for play he'd have earned well over $1 million since the show's demise [which was the point of the article, a 'Michael Landon was a greedy scumbucket' rant]).

Some residuals trivia:

Jack Klugman & Tony Randall both earned much much more from residuals than from the series The Odd Couple. Ditto Werner "Col. Klink" Klemperer, and Bob Crane died very strapped for cash but had he lived a few more years he'd have earned millions as his residuals actually increased [I think he owned a part of the show, which is where the real money is). (I don't think the producers realized quite how much money was in syndication during the late 60s and early 70s and thus they signed away more than they would today to moderately successful stars.)

Redd Foxx, who had a lifelong history of really bad business practices, signed over his residuals to Sanford & Son in a divorce settlement rather than pay his wife something like $800,000 and consequently he died penniless and she is still raking it in.

In the 1990s Audrey Meadows was still receiving residuals from The Honeymooners. She was the only member of the cast to have demanded them during contract negotiation.

None of the children from The Brady Bunch and none of the castaways from Gilligan's Island received residuals after the third repeat. Carol (Florence Henderson), Alice (Ann B. Davis) and the estate of Mike (Robert Reed) still receive them however; the kids got royally screwed by their management evidently.
I read that Dawn Wells from Gilligan's Island got infinite residuals because of a clause in her contract. here is an excerpt from the article: It has long been stated that the entire cast of Gilligan's Island never received residuals beyond the first four reruns of each episode. This was true for the entire cast except Dawn Wells. When the show was picked up by CBS and Dawn was cast to replace Nancy McCarthy, she was married to her agent at the time. In her original contract she was to be paid $1200 per week plus the residual contract the 6 other castaways received. Her husband/agent said that should the show become successful Dawn would not benefit from receiving such a limited residual option. Believing the show would flop, the CBS executives humored Dawn and her husband and put a clause in her contract giving her long-term residuals should the show ever syndicate. As a result from that clause Dawn has made literally millions of dollars as the years have gone by from syndication of Gilligan's Island. This was never public knowledge. Dawn and series creator Sherwood Schwartz are the only individuals to profit long-term from the series.
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Old 02-29-2012, 07:37 AM
Loach Loach is online now
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I am a fan of Jim Beaver's facebook page. Just a couple of days ago he posted this:

"I defy anyone to top this residual-check story: I've had one and two-cent checks delivered to me before (at a full-rate postage stamp per check). But this week, I got a check that beat those. The gross was one cent. But the net was zero cents. But that's not all. They took out TWO cents in tax withholding, leaving an initial net of minus one cent, which they rounded to zero. 'Splain me dat, Lucy. (And yes, there was a 45-cent stamp on the envelope.)"
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Old 02-29-2012, 08:12 AM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loach View Post
I am a fan of Jim Beaver's facebook page. Just a couple of days ago he posted this:

"I defy anyone to top this residual-check story: I've had one and two-cent checks delivered to me before (at a full-rate postage stamp per check). But this week, I got a check that beat those. The gross was one cent. But the net was zero cents. But that's not all. They took out TWO cents in tax withholding, leaving an initial net of minus one cent, which they rounded to zero. 'Splain me dat, Lucy. (And yes, there was a 45-cent stamp on the envelope.)"
I read that, too. Jim Beaver is hilarious and has even posted on the Straight Dope.
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  #16  
Old 02-29-2012, 08:38 AM
That Don Guy That Don Guy is offline
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Originally Posted by silenus View Post
Why do you think the producers all want their shows to get 100 episodes in the can? Because that's the magic number for syndication, and that money is pure profit for the studios. No residuals to pay, just rake in the dough.
Somebody forgot to tell whoever is syndicating the 81 episodes of 'Til Death that you need 100. (I think the number 100 comes from the days of 24-episode seasons, and you pretty much needed four full seasons to make syndication viable.)

Do you honestly think that if Community is cancelled after its fourth season and has only 88 episodes, it won't go into syndication?
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  #17  
Old 02-29-2012, 10:06 AM
Jim's Son Jim's Son is offline
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I remember reading a story a few years ago in "Baseball America" about one agent who appeared as a child actor on an episode of "Streets of San Francisco". He said he got a check for $114 (or thereabouts) every year as residuals for that appearance.
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  #18  
Old 02-29-2012, 11:27 AM
woodstockbirdybird woodstockbirdybird is offline
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Originally Posted by Sampiro View Post
I've heard Vicky Lawrence say that her residuals for Mama's Family were something like $100 per month- not much at all.
She was still wildly overpaid, IMO.

Last edited by woodstockbirdybird; 02-29-2012 at 11:27 AM..
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  #19  
Old 02-29-2012, 06:27 PM
Justin_Bailey Justin_Bailey is online now
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Originally Posted by That Don Guy View Post
Somebody forgot to tell whoever is syndicating the 81 episodes of 'Til Death that you need 100. (I think the number 100 comes from the days of 24-episode seasons, and you pretty much needed four full seasons to make syndication viable.).
100 is the goal, not a hard and fast number. Producers like 100 because channels that air syndicated shows like 100. But as you've noticed, shows with fewer episodes will make it into syndication. Especially since nearly everything gets sold off to some cable channel today.

Logo, a gay-themed digital cable channel, subsisted on episodes of Wonderfalls (13 episodes total) in its first year.
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Old 02-29-2012, 06:53 PM
Loach Loach is online now
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Originally Posted by Mahaloth View Post
I read that, too. Jim Beaver is hilarious and has even posted on the Straight Dope.
Yep jumblejim
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  #21  
Old 02-29-2012, 09:14 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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Originally Posted by Loach View Post
I am a fan of Jim Beaver's facebook page. Just a couple of days ago he posted this:

"I defy anyone to top this residual-check story: I've had one and two-cent checks delivered to me before (at a full-rate postage stamp per check). But this week, I got a check that beat those. The gross was one cent. But the net was zero cents. But that's not all. They took out TWO cents in tax withholding, leaving an initial net of minus one cent, which they rounded to zero. 'Splain me dat, Lucy. (And yes, there was a 45-cent stamp on the envelope.)"
Idjits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fliflito View Post
I read that Dawn Wells from Gilligan's Island got infinite residuals because of a clause in her contract. here is an excerpt from the article: It has long been stated that the entire cast of Gilligan's Island never received residuals beyond the first four reruns of each episode. This was true for the entire cast except Dawn Wells.
Go Dawn! (I always love stories about actors who earn fortunes from beating studio greed- though she was probably wise not to make that well known to her co-stars.)

Alison Arngrim who played Nellie Oleson on Little House on the Prairie wrote a (very very good) memoir last year and says she still receives residuals for Little House. I don't think they're enough to live on, not lavishly anyway, but otoh, getting paid even a few thousand per year for something you did more than 30 years ago is pretty good.

Last edited by Sampiro; 02-29-2012 at 09:19 PM..
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  #22  
Old 02-29-2012, 09:22 PM
obfusciatrist obfusciatrist is online now
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How does it compare to what the guy who wrote the theme song is?

My father-in-law appeared in one episode of Seinfeld (he's one of the Japanese tourists who stayed in Kramer's dresser) and my mother-in-law still gets residuals from that of a few dollars per check. But she made almost six figures a couple years ago because a few second long clip of a TV theme song he wrote in the '60s (in Japan) was used in a popular pachinko machine themed to the show.
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Old 02-29-2012, 09:22 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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The cast and crew of the LOGO sitcom Sordid Lives (based on Del Shores' cult classic movie of the same name and featuring many of the same actors) got majorly screwed on their residuals when the production company that owned the series went bankrupt. The production company cashed the checks but declared bankruptcy and the show has been rerun many times on LOGO (to tens of viewers) but they've never received a cent. Unions were apparently worthless in enforcing it.
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  #24  
Old 02-29-2012, 09:25 PM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
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Originally Posted by fliflito View Post
I read that Dawn Wells from Gilligan's Island got infinite residuals because of a clause in her contract.
Not true, at least not according to this interview with Dawn Wells:
Quote:
B: Did you save your money?

DW: I don't know there was a whole lot to save, but I'm a businesswoman. I know this business is fickle, so I've tried very hard with investments. I'm not rich by any means. Had we had some of those residuals everybody had, sure. But I've managed to make a good living all my life and to provide for when I get old and I'm alone.

B: So you don't make money from the show in syndication?

DW: Not a bit. Not after the first five runs of each episode, which took about two years.
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Old 02-29-2012, 09:31 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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Originally Posted by obfusciatrist View Post
How does it compare to what the guy who wrote the theme song is?
The most famous story about a theme song's royalties is Robert Altman's son Mike, who wrote the lyrics for Suicide is Painless and earned many times the $70,000 his dad received for directing the movie even though the lyrics are hardly ever heard. (Were they ever sung in the series?)
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  #26  
Old 03-01-2012, 12:06 PM
Whyzen Whyzen is offline
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Sampiro, you've provided info about Vicky Lawrence, Kevin Hagen, Jack Klugman, Tony Randall, Werner Klemperer, Bob Crane, Redd Foxx, Audrey Meadows, Florence Henderson, Ann B. Davis, Robert Reed, and Mike Altman.

Where did you get your info?
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Old 03-01-2012, 12:26 PM
pseudotriton ruber ruber pseudotriton ruber ruber is offline
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Originally Posted by obfusciatrist View Post
How does it compare to what the guy who wrote the theme song is?

My father-in-law appeared in one episode of Seinfeld (he's one of the Japanese tourists who stayed in Kramer's dresser) and my mother-in-law still gets residuals from that of a few dollars per check. But she made almost six figures a couple years ago because a few second long clip of a TV theme song he wrote in the '60s (in Japan) was used in a popular pachinko machine themed to the show.
Wasn't that the episode in which Jerry was receiving tiny checks from Japanese TV for appearing briefly on the "The Super-Terrific-Happy Hour" show?
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  #28  
Old 03-01-2012, 12:31 PM
obfusciatrist obfusciatrist is online now
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I don't know, I've never actually seen that episode. My father-in-law was also in Out to Sea (Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon) which my wife and I have also never seen.

It is too weird for her to see him on screen so she seems to subconsciously avoid it.
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  #29  
Old 03-01-2012, 02:26 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loach View Post
I am a fan of Jim Beaver's facebook page. Just a couple of days ago he posted this:

"I defy anyone to top this residual-check story: I've had one and two-cent checks delivered to me before (at a full-rate postage stamp per check). But this week, I got a check that beat those. The gross was one cent. But the net was zero cents. But that's not all. They took out TWO cents in tax withholding, leaving an initial net of minus one cent, which they rounded to zero. 'Splain me dat, Lucy. (And yes, there was a 45-cent stamp on the envelope.)"
My daughter got a check for sixteen cents when the soap she was a SAG extra in ran in Italy. That was after her agent and manager took their cuts.

BTW, where are my residuals from this thread rerunning from 7 years ago?
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  #30  
Old 03-01-2012, 03:12 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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Originally Posted by Whyzen View Post
Sampiro, you've provided info about Vicky Lawrence, Kevin Hagen, Jack Klugman, Tony Randall, Werner Klemperer, Bob Crane, Redd Foxx, Audrey Meadows, Florence Henderson, Ann B. Davis, Robert Reed, and Mike Altman.

Where did you get your info?
That was years and years ago, but various places. Lawrence was interviewed recently before the original thread on why she was touring as Mama (answer: money), Foxx's situation was mentioned in articles on why he died so indigent after earning millions, Klugman and Randall's residuals and the Hogan's Heroes residuals were mentioned in books on their respective series, Hagen had given interviews to the Enquirer (and they were mentioned in his obituary), Henderson mentions her residuals in her very long TV Archives interview. Mike Altman's is a famous bit of show biz trivia (just google his name and royalties) as is Audrey Meadows (google Honeymooners Meadows residuals).
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Old 03-01-2012, 03:18 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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Apparently commercials are about the most lucrative form of residual, especially for actors who aren't famous. I worked with a theatre professor who made enough playing the mom in a not particularly memorable McDonald's commercial in the 1980s [it had a jingle about how irresistible their fries were] to pay for her graduate work and have a nest egg- a total well into the high 5 figures, which while not a lot in career earnings (because that was her big-money to date) it's a helluva lot for a few days work for an unknown.

Last edited by Sampiro; 03-01-2012 at 03:19 PM..
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  #32  
Old 03-01-2012, 03:55 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Originally Posted by Sampiro View Post
The most famous story about a theme song's royalties is Robert Altman's son Mike, who wrote the lyrics for Suicide is Painless and earned many times the $70,000 his dad received for directing the movie even though the lyrics are hardly ever heard. (Were they ever sung in the series?)
Gene Roddenberry wrote lyrics to the theme song to the original Star Trek just for the residuals, or so the story goes. The lyrics were never actually performed in any aired episode.

There's residuals, and then there's merchandising: http://articles.cnn.com/2011-10-19/e...?_s=PM:SHOWBIZ
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Old 03-01-2012, 04:09 PM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
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Does Mike Altman get royalties for the MASH television show if only the instrumental version of the theme song plays? (And I wonder the same thing about the the Star Trek theme song, assuming the story about Gene Roddenberry is correct.)
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  #34  
Old 03-01-2012, 04:25 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Originally Posted by Sampiro View Post
Apparently commercials are about the most lucrative form of residual, especially for actors who aren't famous. I worked with a theatre professor who made enough playing the mom in a not particularly memorable McDonald's commercial in the 1980s [it had a jingle about how irresistible their fries were] to pay for her graduate work and have a nest egg- a total well into the high 5 figures, which while not a lot in career earnings (because that was her big-money to date) it's a helluva lot for a few days work for an unknown.
Hell yes - but you have to hit it lucky. Residuals are paid using a complex formula based on the markets they run in, if it is on network, local or cable, and how often the commercial runs. If you get a national commercial that runs forever you strike it rich. If you are doing a local commercial with a short run, not so much.
My daughter's first job was in a Hess Toy Trucks commercial. For those of you not in the New York area, these are trucks, a different one every year, which go on sale at Hess stations at Thanksgiving. The problem is, they sell out by the next Monday, so the commercial doesn't run that often. She got some small amount of residuals for it, but some years actors got only their day rate.

Cartoon seen in an agent's waiting room: traditional starlet type is snuggled up to a guy in a suit, and says "Tell me again about residuals."
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  #35  
Old 03-01-2012, 06:21 PM
doreen doreen is online now
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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
The problem is, they sell out by the next Monday, so the commercial doesn't run that often. She got some small amount of residuals for it, but some years actors got only their day rate.
Even the day rate for commercials can be better than other work. My son is not an actor,but he's done a few commercials and worked as an extra on a TV show because of his ability to do crazy tricks on a bike. The initial payment for 1 day filming a commercial was more than he got for 2 days work as an extra on a network show.
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  #36  
Old 07-10-2013, 08:49 AM
coach32217 coach32217 is offline
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wrong info given

I think someone gave you wrong information. In music every time a song is paid there is a residual as well as in television. The television networks locally make money through advertising and pay the network for showing reruns. Each time a person is protrayed on television even if your not an actor gets paid. The standard use to be $20.00 back in the 90's. Today it is probably close to $80.00. So every time a face is portrayed or a show has be re-ran then the actors must get a residual. Some Families I know get 200-300 hundred dollars for each re-run but those were re-runs that played on many stations at a one time per month. A small price to pay for the money made from advertising. It cost more to make a new show that may not make it. Does anybody remember actors celebrating because their shows went into syndication and re-runs. Well they didn't get excited because they didn't get paid.
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  #37  
Old 07-10-2013, 02:46 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Originally Posted by coach32217 View Post
I think someone gave you wrong information. In music every time a song is paid there is a residual as well as in television. The television networks locally make money through advertising and pay the network for showing reruns. Each time a person is protrayed on television even if your not an actor gets paid. The standard use to be $20.00 back in the 90's. Today it is probably close to $80.00. So every time a face is portrayed or a show has be re-ran then the actors must get a residual. Some Families I know get 200-300 hundred dollars for each re-run but those were re-runs that played on many stations at a one time per month. A small price to pay for the money made from advertising. It cost more to make a new show that may not make it. Does anybody remember actors celebrating because their shows went into syndication and re-runs. Well they didn't get excited because they didn't get paid.
Sorry, you don't seem to understand the intricacies of the residual system. Here is the SAG FAQ for commercials. Face on the screen is not the important item. A principal performer is one with a speaking role or who has a significant part in the production, if just in front of the crowd. A principal performer does get residuals. An extra does not, no matter if his or her face is in the commercial.

See what I said above about how residuals are calculated. 20 years ago I read the SAG book on this cover to cover, but I'm not about to do so again, and some things might have changed since.

I don't believe extras have to be SAG members, but IIRC they do better if they are. Principal performers must be if they are on a SAG show (which almost all major commercials and network shows are.) SAG used to only allow you to join once you have credit - by your second gig you had to join. AFTRA let anyone join. Dues are expensive so no one joins until they get that gig. Then you rush down top the SAG office to do it.

I don't know the deal in the sticks, my experience was in New York.
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  #38  
Old 07-10-2013, 05:33 PM
cochrane cochrane is offline
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Sampiro mentioned that Bob Crane could have earned millions from "Hogan's Heroes" had he not been murdered. What about other actors who manage to negotiate executive producer credits, like Hugh Laurie for "House, M.D.", for example? Do they profit more from residuals than the other credited actors do?
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  #39  
Old 07-10-2013, 07:46 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cochrane View Post
Sampiro mentioned that Bob Crane could have earned millions from "Hogan's Heroes" had he not been murdered. What about other actors who manage to negotiate executive producer credits, like Hugh Laurie for "House, M.D.", for example? Do they profit more from residuals than the other credited actors do?
You can be sure this is in their contract, though I'm not sure it is technically a residual.
The rule we learned from our daughter's manager is that everything is negotiable, and that we should never sign anything without consulting him. He got her all sorts of extra money on one shoot just by asking. The other parents signed when asked to and lost out.
So the only answerable question about money is what the union rules say. That is the floor.
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  #40  
Old 07-11-2013, 05:15 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
Gene Roddenberry wrote lyrics to the theme song to the original Star Trek just for the residuals, or so the story goes. The lyrics were never actually performed in any aired episode.
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Originally Posted by Dewey Finn View Post
Does Mike Altman get royalties for the MASH television show if only the instrumental version of the theme song plays? (And I wonder the same thing about the the Star Trek theme song, assuming the story about Gene Roddenberry is correct.)
As I understand it, Roddenberry wrote lyrics for the song so that buys him a co-writer copyright share. Yes, they do get royalties for the song performance from copyright even if the lyrics aren't used, because those songs are copyrighted as a unit. That is different than the risiduals actors get as part of their arrangements on aired shows.
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