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  #1  
Old 11-20-2005, 11:01 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Canada: Right turn on red?

Is it legal in Canada, specifically in British Columbia, to make a right turn on a red light?
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  #2  
Old 11-20-2005, 11:22 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Thanks.
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  #3  
Old 11-20-2005, 11:28 AM
Tapioca Dextrin Tapioca Dextrin is online now
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From the horse's mouth

Quote:
Red light

A red light means you must stop. Bring your vehicle to a complete stop at the stop line if it is marked on the pavement. If there is no stop line, stop at the crosswalk, marked or not. If there is no crosswalk, stop at the edge of the sidewalk. If there is no sidewalk, stop at the edge of the intersection.


Wait until the light changes to green and the intersection is clear before moving through it.

Unless a sign tells you not to, you may turn right on a red light only after coming to a complete stop and waiting until the way is clear. You may also turn left on a red light if you are moving from a one-way road into a one-way road, but you must come to a complete stop first and wait until the way is clear.
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  #4  
Old 11-20-2005, 11:32 AM
The Flying Dutchman The Flying Dutchman is offline
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Is it not legal in the US ?
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  #5  
Old 11-20-2005, 11:37 AM
Rick Rick is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Flying Dutchman
Is it not legal in the US ?
Yes it is, but Canada is another country.
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  #6  
Old 11-20-2005, 11:57 AM
Speaker for the Dead Speaker for the Dead is offline
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Since the question has been answered, I feel compelled to insert an anecdote. The importance of coming to a complete stop was rammed home to me when I failed my driver's test for forgetting to do so. I pulled around the corner as the light turned yellow, and in the time it took me to look left for oncoming traffic, it turned red and I didn't notice. I hadn't stopped completely, so automatic fail for "running a red light." So sad .
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  #7  
Old 11-20-2005, 12:00 PM
percypercy percypercy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Flying Dutchman
Is it not legal in the US ?
Depends on where you are.
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  #8  
Old 11-20-2005, 12:17 PM
chrisk chrisk is offline
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I grew up in Hamilton, Ontario, which my mom used to say is "the only town where it's legal to turn left on red without a sign."

(In a lot of downtown-to-west side Hamilton, almost all the streets are one-way, and where a one-way street meets a one-way street, the same rules apply to turning left on red that usually apply to turning right on red - assuming that turning left won't have you going the wrong way down the street of course.)
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  #9  
Old 11-20-2005, 12:49 PM
PastAllReason PastAllReason is offline
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This is subject to provincial regulation and there is some variation worth noting if you're travelling in Canada. For example according to this site :

"Right turn on red
Making a right turn on a red light is permitted throughout Québec, EXCEPT in Montréal. Drivers are nonetheless required to make a complete halt before turning right on a red light, as well as to give the right of the way to any vehicles, cyclists or pedestrians already using the intersection. However, for safety reasons, right turns on a red light continue to be prohibited at all times at certain clearly marked intersections. Failure to comply could result in a fine ranging from $100 to $200. For information on the new signage, visit the Website of the Ministère des Transports du Québec."
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  #10  
Old 11-20-2005, 12:54 PM
Raygun99 Raygun99 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PastAllReason
This is subject to provincial regulation and there is some variation worth noting if you're travelling in Canada. For example according to this site :

"Right turn on red
Making a right turn on a red light is permitted throughout Québec, EXCEPT in Montréal. Drivers are nonetheless required to make a complete halt before turning right on a red light, as well as to give the right of the way to any vehicles, cyclists or pedestrians already using the intersection. However, for safety reasons, right turns on a red light continue to be prohibited at all times at certain clearly marked intersections. Failure to comply could result in a fine ranging from $100 to $200. For information on the new signage, visit the Website of the Ministère des Transports du Québec."

Montreal is pretty much it for not being able to turn right on a red in Canada.

The irony being that Montrealers ignore red lights anyway.
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  #11  
Old 11-20-2005, 01:01 PM
Jet Jaguar Jet Jaguar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by percypercy
Depends on where you are.
I'd like to point out it's legal to turn right on red everywhere in the US except New York City, unless the intersection is explicitly marked "no turn on red". I live in a major tourist area and I hate getting stuck behind cars, almost invariably with out of state plates, that won't turn on a red light.
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  #12  
Old 11-20-2005, 01:07 PM
Bearflag70 Bearflag70 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speaker for the Dead
The importance of coming to a complete stop was rammed home to me when I failed my driver's test for forgetting to do so.
The importance of coming to a complete stop on your driving test was rammed home.
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  #13  
Old 11-20-2005, 01:08 PM
GorillaMan GorillaMan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jet Jaguar
I live in a major tourist area and I hate getting stuck behind cars, almost invariably with out of state plates, that won't turn on a red light.
Having been the tourist in such situations, I tell you that right-on-red is far and away the most difficult thing to adjust to. Driving on the wrong side of the road I didn't find a problem, just had to keep reminding myself each time I set off. Lack of lane discipline on highways, I can cope with that. Astonishing adherence to speed limits (this wasn't NYC or Montreal ) was fascinating. But pulling up to a red light, stopping, then driving through it just feels so so very wrong, completely counter-intuitive.
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  #14  
Old 11-20-2005, 01:11 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan
Astonishing adherence to speed limits (this wasn't NYC or Montreal ) was fascinating.
This is why I hate driving through Driver's Purgatory, or 'Oregon' as some people call it.
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  #15  
Old 11-20-2005, 01:31 PM
Muffin Muffin is offline
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Traffic laws vary by province. Usually you can turn right on red.

Turning right on red is new to Quebec, and still is prohibited on Montreal Island, so don't expect people to be used to this: http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/en/reseau/...ion/virage.asp

Turning left onto a one-way street is permitted in some provinces, but not permitted in other provinces: http://www.geocities.com/jusjih/traf...ignals.html#ca

Traffic circles vary. Usually the vehicle entering must yield, but sometimes (such as the one in Manitouwadge, Ontario), the vehicle already in the circle must yield.

Watch out for uncontrolled intersections where there are no lights or signs in any direction (such as some residential neighbourhoods in Vancouver). For these, the last in yields, or if both vehicles arrived at the same time, the one on the left yields. The problem, of course, is that without any signs of lights, such intersections can be somewhat like the intersetion at a figure 8 crash-em derby because some folks mistakenly equate no stop sign with having the right of way.
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  #16  
Old 11-20-2005, 01:33 PM
Muffin Muffin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muffin
Turning left onto a one-way street is permitted in some provinces, but not permitted in other provinces: http://www.geocities.com/jusjih/traf...ignals.html#ca
Make that turning left onto a one-way street from a one way street.
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  #17  
Old 11-20-2005, 02:09 PM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PastAllReason
This is subject to provincial regulation and there is some variation worth noting if you're travelling in Canada. For example according to this site :

"Right turn on red
Making a right turn on a red light is permitted throughout Québec, EXCEPT in Montréal. Drivers are nonetheless required to make a complete halt before turning right on a red light, as well as to give the right of the way to any vehicles, cyclists or pedestrians already using the intersection. However, for safety reasons, right turns on a red light continue to be prohibited at all times at certain clearly marked intersections. Failure to comply could result in a fine ranging from $100 to $200. For information on the new signage, visit the Website of the Ministère des Transports du Québec."
"And maybe I can't turn right on a red light, but, tabarnac, I can go right through it!"


http://mazzysplace.nomadlife.org/200...-canadian.aspx
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  #18  
Old 11-20-2005, 02:49 PM
jasonh300 jasonh300 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jet Jaguar
I'd like to point out it's legal to turn right on red everywhere in the US except New York City, unless the intersection is explicitly marked "no turn on red". I live in a major tourist area and I hate getting stuck behind cars, almost invariably with out of state plates, that won't turn on a red light.
It's illegal in downtown New Orleans too (except where it's posted that you CAN do it). My observation is that anywhere there is a "Walk/Don't Walk" light, you can't make the right on red because the peds have the right of way.

Some intersections in New Orleans have "Right on Arrow Only". This is the absolute worst because you can't turn right on red, or green. The light will turn green and you have to wait another 30 seconds for the "Don't Walk" light and then the right turn arrow will come on. They have a lot of these where there is almost no pedestrian traffic and it's really annoying. But they did this around 40 years ago and never made adjustments since then. Things have changed a lot in 40 years.
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  #19  
Old 11-20-2005, 03:05 PM
GorillaMan GorillaMan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonh300
My observation is that anywhere there is a "Walk/Don't Walk" light, you can't make the right on red because the peds have the right of way.
Don't know about the US, but I think I'm right in thinking that (at least parts of Canada) allow right-on-red, but with the requirement to give way to any pedestrians on a signalled crossing.
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  #20  
Old 11-20-2005, 03:36 PM
chrisk chrisk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan
Don't know about the US, but I think I'm right in thinking that (at least parts of Canada) allow right-on-red, but with the requirement to give way to any pedestrians on a signalled crossing.
Yeah. I think around here pedestrians have the right of way even if there isn't a signal crosswalk, or any kind of crosswalk, versus cars making a turn. Sometimes, though, there just aren't any pedestrians crossing.
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  #21  
Old 11-20-2005, 03:37 PM
Ms Macphisto Ms Macphisto is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muffin
Make that turning left onto a one-way street from a one way street.
Though according to that link, it is ok to turn left from a two-way street onto a one-way street on a red light in BC. I never knew that. Seeing as I'm fairly sure I've never seen anyone do that, I doubt that anyone else knows that either, so I don't think it's something I'll try out any time soon.
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  #22  
Old 11-20-2005, 04:13 PM
Muffin Muffin is offline
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In Nunavut (all 770,000 suqare miles of it), there is no traffic light to turn at or go through, although Iqualiut has considered installing one: http://www.nunatsiaq.com/archives/nu...t/20712_4.html

However, parking spaces are being laid out in Iqualiut. One resident has stated: "This is the first time we have ever seen poles in Iqaluit, so I don't like it." http://www.cbc.ca/north/story/print/iq-parking-10112005
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  #23  
Old 11-20-2005, 05:10 PM
Speaker for the Dead Speaker for the Dead is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearflag70
The importance of coming to a complete stop on your driving test was rammed home.
Ah, yes. Touche .
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  #24  
Old 11-22-2005, 12:55 PM
Queuing Queuing is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisk
I grew up in Hamilton, Ontario, which my mom used to say is "the only town where it's legal to turn left on red without a sign."

(In a lot of downtown-to-west side Hamilton, almost all the streets are one-way, and where a one-way street meets a one-way street, the same rules apply to turning left on red that usually apply to turning right on red - assuming that turning left won't have you going the wrong way down the street of course.)
I went to school in Hamilton, and while that may have been true at one time, it always seemed to me (particularly in the downtown core where most of the 1 way streets are) that there was always a sign forbidding you to do so. I always hated that.
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  #25  
Old 11-22-2005, 01:51 PM
Rodd Hill Rodd Hill is offline
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Well, since no-one has *really* answered the OP (what is the deal in British Columbia?):

Quote:
(3) Despite subsection (1), and except when a right turn permitted by this subsection is prohibited by a sign at an intersection, the driver of a vehicle facing the red light, and which in obedience to it is stopped as closely as practicable to a marked crosswalk on the near side of the intersection, or if there is no marked crosswalk, as closely as practicable to the intersection, may cause the vehicle to make a right turn, but the driver must yield the right of way to all pedestrians and vehicles lawfully proceeding as directed by the signal at the intersection.
From the BC Motor Vehicle Act, Chapter 318.
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