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  #1  
Old 02-12-2006, 03:06 PM
astro astro is offline
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What does the word "Pamplamousse" mean?

This word popped into my head lthis morning while showering, and I can't get rid of it. It's got to mean something, but I have no specific memory of it. It doesn't look as if it was one of the Banana Splits characters. Googling yields a French surname, but no object or popular character. Maybe I picked it up as a tyke in Abidjan. Does "pamplamousse" mean anything?
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Old 02-12-2006, 03:07 PM
gaucho gaucho is offline
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"Grapefruit"
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Old 02-12-2006, 03:14 PM
astro astro is offline
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Originally Posted by gaucho
"Grapefruit"
Thanks!
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Old 02-12-2006, 03:18 PM
Tierce Tierce is offline
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Spelling?

Try "pamplemousse" with an e in the middle. Google returns 869,000 results.

The occurrence that rings a bell for me is a character in a series of novels by Michael Bond. Detective turned undercover food critic, Monsieur Pamplemousse and his loyal dog Pommes Frites.
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Old 02-12-2006, 03:32 PM
Amaranta Amaranta is offline
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It's my favourite french word. I'll slip it into pretty much any conversation that involves even a bit of french. For example, if someone walks by me and says "Excuse-moi", I'll respond with, "De rien, pamplemousse". It's also a term of affection. I just love it.

Paaaaampleeeemouuuuse!
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Old 02-12-2006, 06:23 PM
deevee deevee is offline
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Originally Posted by Amaranta
It's also a term of affection. I just love it.

Paaaaampleeeemouuuuse!
Me too! But what I really mean is that you're round, fruity, and bitter inside.
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Old 02-12-2006, 06:46 PM
astro astro is offline
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Originally Posted by deevee
Me too! But what I really mean is that you're round, fruity, and bitter inside.
Or that you'll spit in someone's eye if they jab you with a spoon.
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Old 02-12-2006, 09:33 PM
ombre3 ombre3 is offline
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A little late on this one. --- Former French Lit major here. (Way back in 1964.)

And of course pamplemousse in French does translate to grapefruit in English----as so many have already stated.

It does help to know how to spell words to find out anything.

Ain't most all languages a little stupid that way?
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Old 02-12-2006, 10:08 PM
deevee deevee is offline
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Originally Posted by ombre3
A little late on this one. ?
The main thing of course is that you got here.
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Old 02-13-2006, 03:56 AM
irishgirl irishgirl is offline
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Better even that pamplemousse is the french for pink grapefruit- pamplemousse rose!
I like "Ananas" much better than "pineapple" too.
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Old 02-13-2006, 04:32 AM
Pushkin Pushkin is offline
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I love this french word too, it just seems so, silly I guess
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Old 02-13-2006, 04:58 AM
hawthorne hawthorne is offline
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Quote:
astro
This word popped into my head lthis morning while showering, and I can't get rid of it. It's got to mean something, but I have no specific memory of it.
I have a vague memory of it being one of half a dozen words being used to illustrate the workings of one of those TV advertised memory systems.
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Old 02-13-2006, 06:14 AM
Larry Mudd Larry Mudd is offline
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I can never see that word (and being Canadian, I see it a lot,) without thinking of a mid-'70s National Lampoon parody of the prison-break novel/film Papillon with that title.

Butterfly/Grapefuit. Much the same.
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Old 02-13-2006, 06:37 AM
Jurph Jurph is offline
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You may be thinking back to high school French, where a show called Telefrançais included an infectious song about the fruit. The song, as near as I remember, was half-hearted attempts at rhymes during the verses, and a catchy chorus of:

Le Pamplemousse, le pamplemousse,
le roi des fruits, le roi des fruits!


...sung, confusingly, by Monsieur L'ananas, a Muppet-esque pineapple, and his chorus of other fruits, among which there was nary a grapefruit to be found. If one did not know what le pamplemousse was, one would be forced to look at the chorus line and guess, and no matter what you guessed, you'd be wrong.
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Old 02-13-2006, 08:21 AM
Mindfield Mindfield is offline
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I've always considered Pamplemousse one of my favourite French words. In hindsight I should have signed up here as Monsseur Pamplemousse.

I can't seem to find the etymology of the word though -- which I guess is a little difficult given that it's in French. I was sort of curious about the mousse ("Foam") part, which didn't make a whole lot of sense to me. My Google-fu seems to be off, though I did glance past something about Pamplemoes which may have been its original word. I also learned that the Pumelo, an ancestor of the Grapefruit, is also called Pamplemousse -- or perhaps it was originally called that and the same word just got applied to the pumelo's decendents. Neither of these bits helped though.
  #16  
Old 02-13-2006, 11:27 AM
Bambi Hassenpfeffer Bambi Hassenpfeffer is offline
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You may know it from a bit on The Simpsons. Lisa accidentally goes to West Springfield Elementary, and she walks into where her class should be. Instead of finding Miss Hoover, she finds a French teacher who is using it in a sample sentence:

"La grenouille mange la pamplemousse" -- The frog eats grapefruit.

That's the only place I've ever heard it.
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Old 02-13-2006, 11:55 AM
Jenny Haniver Jenny Haniver is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jurph
You may be thinking back to high school French, where a show called Telefrançais included an infectious song about the fruit. The song, as near as I remember, was half-hearted attempts at rhymes during the verses, and a catchy chorus of:

Le Pamplemousse, le pamplemousse,
le roi des fruits, le roi des fruits!


...sung, confusingly, by Monsieur L'ananas, a Muppet-esque pineapple, and his chorus of other fruits, among which there was nary a grapefruit to be found. If one did not know what le pamplemousse was, one would be forced to look at the chorus line and guess, and no matter what you guessed, you'd be wrong.

Merci! I've been reading the thread and trying to fathom why, after five years of French classes, I thought it was a pineapple.
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Old 02-13-2006, 12:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jurph
Le Pamplemousse, le pamplemousse,
le roi des fruits, le roi des fruits!
Oh, king eh? Very nice. And how'd you get that, eh? By exploiting the workers. By hanging on to outdated imperialist dogma which perpetuates the economic and social differences in our society.


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  #19  
Old 02-13-2006, 12:30 PM
Mindfield Mindfield is offline
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Le roi est morte. Vive le roi!
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Old 02-13-2006, 01:02 PM
Jenny Haniver Jenny Haniver is offline
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Légumes, Égalité, Fraternité!
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Old 02-13-2006, 01:17 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amaranta
For example, if someone walks by me and says "Excuse-moi", I'll respond with, "De rien, pamplemousse". It's also a term of affection. I just love it.

Paaaaampleeeemouuuuse!
Tish! That's French!
  #22  
Old 02-13-2006, 01:19 PM
Nature's Call Nature's Call is offline
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Wait, are you sure it doesn't mean something like "milk the caribou?" Nope, you're right... I was thinking "Pump le moose"

Carry on!
  #23  
Old 02-13-2006, 02:32 PM
Mindfield Mindfield is offline
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Originally Posted by Nature's Call
Wait, are you sure it doesn't mean something like "milk the caribou?" Nope, you're right... I was thinking "Pump le moose"

Carry on!
You are dangerously close to being whacked with the pun stick.
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Old 02-17-2006, 03:55 AM
Pushkin Pushkin is offline
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Is it worth mentioning that I've had to post out information to two different people in Mauritius who live in Pamplemousses?
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Old 02-17-2006, 07:46 AM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
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Originally Posted by Mindfield
. . . I can't seem to find the etymology of the word though -- which I guess is a little difficult given that it's in French. . . .
Larousse sez: "from Dutch pompel, large, and limoes, lemon." It also defines the word rather endearingly as "fruit de pamplemoussier."
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Old 09-18-2010, 07:09 PM
NateMD NateMD is offline
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La grenouille mange le pamplemousse

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Originally Posted by Bambi Hassenpfeffer View Post
You may know it from a bit on The Simpsons.
If you change the audio from English to French, the dialogue for this scene is NOT "La grenouille mange le pamplemousse". Can anyone tell me what the French version says, and how that translates into English? Just wondering how they went about translating the joke for a French audience.
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Old 09-18-2010, 07:36 PM
Punoqllads Punoqllads is offline
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Pomplemoose = grapefruit
Pomplamoose = awesomeness
  #28  
Old 09-18-2010, 09:18 PM
Ike Witt Ike Witt is online now
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Pomplamoose = awesomeness
Until 3:06 ago, I had not heard of this group. Yes, they are awesome.
  #29  
Old 09-18-2010, 09:36 PM
11811 11811 is offline
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Originally Posted by Amaranta View Post
It's my favourite french word. I'll slip it into pretty much any conversation that involves even a bit of french. For example, if someone walks by me and says "Excuse-moi", I'll respond with, "De rien, pamplemousse". It's also a term of affection. I just love it.

Paaaaampleeeemouuuuse!
So zen zees ess ze fey-moos pamplemousse of love?
  #30  
Old 09-18-2010, 09:43 PM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
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[French Teacher]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bambi Hassenpfeffer View Post
"La grenouille mange la pamplemousse" -- The frog eats grapefruit.
La grenouille mange le pamplemousse - the frog eats the grapefruit. Graprefruit is masculine (clearly!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mindfield View Post
Le roi est morte. Vive le roi!
Le roi est mort. Vive le roi! - The king is dead. (Long) live the king!

"le roi" is masculine.

[/French Teacher]



Quote:
Originally Posted by NateMD View Post
If you change the audio from English to French, the dialogue for this scene is NOT "La grenouille mange le pamplemousse". Can anyone tell me what the French version says, and how that translates into English? Just wondering how they went about translating the joke for a French audience.
I found this YouTube version (which is really hard to understand) but the phrase spoken seems to be "Le roi François mangeoit boule de chapeau. " which is a complete nonsense phrase in French. The first three words translate as "The king, Francois". "mangeoit" isn't a correct conjugation at all for the verb "manger" - to eat. Perhaps it's "mangait" (imperfect) or "mangerait" (conditional present) but it doesn't sound that way to me. "boule de chapeau" translates literally as "ball of hat" or "hat ball". It could be plural as "boules de chapeaux" but to the ear there's no way to really tell other than context, but it's nonsensical.

It seems to me* that French translations of English TV shows often take the stance that while the dialogue is in French, the assumed language spoken by the characters is English, and so any French in the show is either left as-is (or with a more exaggerated accent to emphasize it's different-ness) or is changed for something nonsensical but vaguely French, especially when what is spoken is intended to be clearly incomprehensible to the main characters.

*I generally watch shows and movies in their original language, though, so I could be wrong, but the latter is clearly what they did for the Simpsons.
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Old 09-18-2010, 10:01 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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Now wait a minute, astro. You Googled on "pamplamousse" and found nothing about it being the French word for "grapefruit"? Are you using a different Google than I am? When I put the word "pamplamousse" in Google, it goes out of its way to try to correct my spelling to "pamplemousse" and show me a page of results, the second from the top of which is the dictionary entry for "pamplemousse" in French.
  #32  
Old 09-18-2010, 10:04 PM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
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Le Pamplemousse, le pamplemousse,
... will you do the Fandango?
  #33  
Old 09-18-2010, 10:55 PM
Monstera deliciosa Monstera deliciosa is offline
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Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
Now wait a minute, astro. You Googled on "pamplamousse" and found nothing about it being the French word for "grapefruit"? Are you using a different Google than I am? When I put the word "pamplamousse" in Google, it goes out of its way to try to correct my spelling to "pamplemousse" and show me a page of results, the second from the top of which is the dictionary entry for "pamplemousse" in French.
Check the date of the OP. I'm not sure that Google was that efficient then.
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Old 09-18-2010, 11:15 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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Sorry, you're right. I didn't notice that this is a zombie thread that someone revived several hours before my post.
  #35  
Old 09-19-2010, 02:51 AM
Kobal2 Kobal2 is offline
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"mangeoit" isn't a correct conjugation at all for the verb "manger" - to eat. Perhaps it's "mangait" (imperfect) or "mangerait" (conditional present) but it doesn't sound that way to me.
I kinda doubt the Simpsons' writers checked that far, but the "-oit" conjugation is actually an old form of the French simple past. Old as in "ye olde Frenche". It sometimes crops up when a French speaker wants to ape how people of the past talked, like English people will resort to "thou speakest".
Old French also often omitted definite articles, so "mangeoit boule de chapeau", while still nonsensical in its meaning would not be automatically incorrect semantically, least not in that regard. It still should be "boule de chapeaux", plural .

Last edited by Kobal2; 09-19-2010 at 02:52 AM.
  #36  
Old 09-19-2010, 11:55 AM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is offline
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So, Curious George's mother is named "Grapefruit"????
  #37  
Old 09-19-2010, 12:22 PM
matt_mcl matt_mcl is offline
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Merci! I've been reading the thread and trying to fathom why, after five years of French classes, I thought it was a pineapple.
Each man will be issued a pamplemousse!!

Last edited by matt_mcl; 09-19-2010 at 12:23 PM.
  #38  
Old 09-19-2010, 01:10 PM
Hypnagogic Jerk Hypnagogic Jerk is offline
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Originally Posted by mnemosyne View Post
I found this YouTube version (which is really hard to understand) but the phrase spoken seems to be "Le roi François mangeoit boule de chapeau. " which is a complete nonsense phrase in French. The first three words translate as "The king, Francois". "mangeoit" isn't a correct conjugation at all for the verb "manger" - to eat. Perhaps it's "mangait" (imperfect) or "mangerait" (conditional present) but it doesn't sound that way to me. "boule de chapeau" translates literally as "ball of hat" or "hat ball". It could be plural as "boules de chapeaux" but to the ear there's no way to really tell other than context, but it's nonsensical.
I haven't bought the 12th season of The Simpsons yet, so I can't check what the French audio (Quebec version) says at that point. This said, in the spirit of Gaudere's law: mangeait.

Quote:
It seems to me* that French translations of English TV shows often take the stance that while the dialogue is in French, the assumed language spoken by the characters is English, and so any French in the show is either left as-is (or with a more exaggerated accent to emphasize it's different-ness) or is changed for something nonsensical but vaguely French, especially when what is spoken is intended to be clearly incomprehensible to the main characters.
I never watch King of the Hill in French on purpose, but I've caught part of some episodes (once again this would be the Quebec version) and it seems to me that we're supposed to believe this takes place somewhere in Quebec and ignore the overwhelming texanness of the whole show. I think the cognitive dissonance itself is the main reason why I don't watch the show in French.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kobal2 View Post
I kinda doubt the Simpsons' writers checked that far, but the "-oit" conjugation is actually an old form of the French simple past. Old as in "ye olde Frenche". It sometimes crops up when a French speaker wants to ape how people of the past talked, like English people will resort to "thou speakest".
This is actually exactly what they did here (and it wasn't the Simpsons writers, but the French (France) translators). The teacher, after saying he doesn't know who Miss Hoover is, clearly says "moi, j'enseigne le vieux françois" ("I teach Old French.")

Quote:
Old French also often omitted definite articles, so "mangeoit boule de chapeau", while still nonsensical in its meaning would not be automatically incorrect semantically, least not in that regard. It still should be "boule de chapeaux", plural .
I believe the plural of "boule de chapeau" should be "boules de chapeaux", if I remember my grammar rules correctly.

Last edited by Hypnagogic Jerk; 09-19-2010 at 01:12 PM.
  #39  
Old 09-19-2010, 01:59 PM
Lumpy Lumpy is offline
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Try "pamplemousse" with an e in the middle. Google returns 869,000 results.

The occurrence that rings a bell for me is a character in a series of novels by Michael Bond. Detective turned undercover food critic, Monsieur Pamplemousse and his loyal dog Pommes Frites.
My wife ordered every book in the series she could get- actually sent overseas for some. For some reason she was not amused by my referring to him as "Monsieur PimpleJuice".
  #40  
Old 09-19-2010, 03:07 PM
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pom·pel·mous n. See shaddock. [Dutch pompelmoes (influenced by pompoen, gourd and Portuguese limoes, lemon) probably ultimately from Tamil pampalim³su.]

Citrus - Citron, Grapefruit, Lemon, Lime, Orange, Shaddock ...
CITRUS plant identification description, photos, and information on potting, growing, propagation, varieties, and region of origin.
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Last edited by robcaro; 09-19-2010 at 03:08 PM.
  #41  
Old 09-19-2010, 03:10 PM
Gymnopithys Gymnopithys is offline
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"La grenouille mange le pamplemousse - the frog eats the grapefruit. Graprefruit is masculine (clearly!)"

Larousse says masculine or feminine. I say "la".

Grapefruit are often called in French... grapefruit. Pronounced à la française.
  #42  
Old 09-19-2010, 03:16 PM
Johnny Q Johnny Q is offline
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So that's what Steve Miller meant by "The Pamplamousse of Love" Now why is Maurice the Grapefruit of Love?
  #43  
Old 09-19-2010, 04:28 PM
Hypnagogic Jerk Hypnagogic Jerk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gymnopithys View Post
"La grenouille mange le pamplemousse - the frog eats the grapefruit. Graprefruit is masculine (clearly!)"

Larousse says masculine or feminine. I say "la".
That's something I didn't know. Trésor says masculine, but points out that most dictionaries recognize the double gender, with the usage favouring the masculine but the Académie française favouring the feminine.

Quote:
Grapefruit are often called in French... grapefruit. Pronounced à la française.
This is also mentioned in the Trésor entry for pamplemousse, but I for one have never heard it. Where have you heard this usage?
  #44  
Old 09-19-2010, 04:56 PM
Chessic Sense Chessic Sense is offline
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Do zombies like grapefruit? Brains, sure, but bitter fruit?
  #45  
Old 09-19-2010, 05:00 PM
hibernicus hibernicus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hypnagogic Jerk View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gymnopithys View Post
"La grenouille mange le pamplemousse - the frog eats the grapefruit. Graprefruit is masculine (clearly!)"

Larousse says masculine or feminine. I say "la".
That's something I didn't know. Trésor says masculine, but points out that most dictionaries recognize the double gender, with the usage favouring the masculine but the Académie française favouring the feminine.

Quote:
Grapefruit are often called in French... grapefruit. Pronounced à la française.
This is also mentioned in the Trésor entry for pamplemousse, but I for one have never heard it. Where have you heard this usage?
Switzerland, perhaps.

There seems to be some confusion between pomelo and grapefruit in both English and French. According to Wikipedia the French call the pomelo (Citrus maxima) "pamplemousse" and the grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) "pomélo" (this being the "correct" rather than the popular usage). But the Swiss (Romands) call the pomelo "pomélo" and the grapefruit "pamplemousse" or "grapefruit".
  #46  
Old 09-19-2010, 06:13 PM
jasonh300 jasonh300 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ike Witt View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punoqllads View Post
Pomplamoose = awesomeness
Until 3:06 ago, I had not heard of this group. Yes, they are awesome.
Their version of "Mr. Sandman" was used in a commercial recently (I think it was a TV commercial for an American automaker, but I'm not sure).
  #47  
Old 09-19-2010, 11:40 PM
Kobal2 Kobal2 is offline
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I believe the plural of "boule de chapeau" should be "boules de chapeaux", if I remember my grammar rules correctly.
Depends. I assumed the king was eating just the one ball of hats. A hat is big, a ball of hats bigger still. How would he fit several balls of hats in his mouth ?!
  #48  
Old 09-20-2010, 02:00 AM
Gymnopithys Gymnopithys is offline
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Quote:
Grapefruit are often called in French... grapefruit. Pronounced à la française.
Quote:
This is also mentioned in the Trésor entry for pamplemousse, but I for one have never heard it. Where have you heard this usage?
In French speaking Switzerland when they were first imported but I think it's being replaced now by pamplemousse.
  #49  
Old 09-20-2010, 06:04 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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It's the name of a fancy-shmancy store in Salem, MA that sells wines, delicacies, and odd kitchen gadgets. But no grapefruit. Or, AFAICanRecall, anything for eating or preparing grapefruit.
  #50  
Old 09-20-2010, 06:20 AM
Gyrate Gyrate is offline
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It's the name of a collection of Bob the Angry Flower cartoons. Stephen Notley at one point erroneously thought "pamplemousse" meant "pineapple", hence the cover. The back cover corrects the error.
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