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Old 09-24-2006, 09:47 PM
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What are you reading this month, dopers?


Tell a little about what books you just read, are reading, and plan to read next. Why did you pick them? Did you enjoy them? Etc.

This month I've read Young Men and Fire, by Norman MacLean, about the 1949 Mann Gulch Fire that claimed the lives of fourteen Smoke Jumpers. My younger brother is a firefighter, so I'm interested in stories about fighting fires, and the reviews on amazon.com were mostly good. I found the story fascinating but the prose hard to put up with. From there I jumped to Sebastian Junger's FIRE, which also has an account of a forest fire disaster, along with accounts of reporting from a war zone and other interesting pieces.

Then it was back to fiction. I read a pretty intriguing first novel by Kit Whitfield, called Benighted, in which she creates a world where almost everyone is a lycanthrope, and tells us what it is like for the few who aren't, along with a murder mystery.

Rachel Caine's new Weather Warden book: Firestorm, was sadly disappointing. This is book five in the series of fast-paced action/paranormal/romance books about a secret group of paranormally talented people who control the elements of Fire, Air & Water, and Earth, with the mostly unwilling help of the enslaved djinn. I loved the first three, was a bit let down by the fourth and found the fifth one too repetitious and chaotic, with too much happening and not enough of it forwarding the plotlines laid down in the previous novels.

I took a step down to a book I expected to be bad: Josepha Sherman's The Shattered Oath. Standard fantasy fare about an exiled Prince of the Fae in the human realm. It was cliche and amatuerish in spots, but not as terrible as I thought it might be, and it was free anyway.

Much anticipated books have just arrived in the mail, though!

To Ride a Rathorn, by P.C. Hodgell is what I'm reading now. Hodgell is a marvellous fantasy writer whose books come out way too far apart. This is book four of a series she started in 1982 with God Stalk, and you do need to have read them all, in order. But it's great stuff. I expect to love it.

Robin Hobb's new book, Forest Mage also arrived. I loved the Farseer works, and while I didn't like the first book in this series as much as I loved those, I admired her ambition to do something entirely different and difficult besides.

Also, I'm looking forward to reading E.E. Knight's Valentine's Exile, book five of the Vampire Earth books. These books about a ragtag group of human resisters fighting back against an alien occupation kick ass and take names.

Books in route to me from paperbackswap.com are A Perfect Storm, which I have read from the library and will reread when I get it, and Faery in Shadow by C.J. Cherryh(a favorite writer most of the time).

How's about you guys?
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Old 09-24-2006, 09:52 PM
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I'm re-reading Dune in-between all my readings for school (Ostrogorsky and Tacitus, anyone?). I like to read it every few years or so* and find that like in re-readings of LOTR, I notice details that I hadn't before.

I've never read any of the other books in the Dune series, but I've heard bad things. I'm still deciding whether I'll go there or not.

*usually at weird life crossroads, where I benefit the most from getting the Litany Against Fear pounded into my head every 50 pages or so.
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Old 09-24-2006, 10:38 PM
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I'm re-reading two Star Wars novels and I just checked out a bunch of books from the library as well. I'm reading them two at a time:

Princesses: the Six Daughters of George III by Flora Fraser

And a novel entitled The Kitchen Boy: a Novel of the Last Tsar by Robert Alexander

I also have Keith Olbermann's new book on order from Amazon.com. I can't wait until it gets here!
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Old 09-24-2006, 10:42 PM
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Three Days to Never by Tim Powers. I always hoping that he'll come up with something that I like as much as The Anubis Gates. I'm about 40 pages in--so far, so good.
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Old 09-24-2006, 10:45 PM
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S. M. Stirling's A Meeting At Corvallis arrived last week, so it's currently being read. Next up will likely be Robert Rankin's The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse.
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Old 09-24-2006, 11:09 PM
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I just read To Feel Stuff, which was set in the Brown University Infirmary and was really not worth the time. I've just started Mapping the World of Harry Potter, a collection of essays by SF writers I mostly haven't heard of. I ordered A Meeting in Corvallis from SFBC, but somehow they didn't register it, damn it, so I'm having to re-order.

I have the second set of Gene Wolfe "Sun" books waiting, and about 10 non-fiction works on Southeast Asia. I'll probably re-read HP and the Order of the Phoenix and HP and the Half-Blood Prince in the next few weeks.
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Old 09-24-2006, 11:16 PM
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I'm in the middle of The True History of the Kelly Gang, by Peter Carey. A fictional account of the life and death of Australia's famous outlaw, Ned Kelly and an amazing book -- evocative, incredibly well imagined and genuinely exciting. It won the Booker Prize in 2001 and it's an adjectival* page turner.

*Since the book is presented as a series of journals and letters from Ned Kelly to his baby daughter, our hero tries to clean up his language to spare her delicate sensibilities. He substitutes "adjectival" for the more colorful expletive -- as in "Shut your adjectival mouth or I'll blow your adjectival head off." It's my new favorite word.
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Old 09-24-2006, 11:21 PM
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I just finished Forever by Pete Hamill, which I must have heard about from a Doper. It's about a young man who emigrates to America from Ireland in 1740, seeking vengeance. In America he's given the gift of eternal (?) life, as long as he doesn't leave Manhattan. The book's full of interesting and well-told historical detail, but I think Hamill copped out on the ending.

Just started The Dogs of Winter by Kem Nunn. I picked this up because David Milch is shooting a pilot based on Kem Nunn's "surf noir" books and I was curious.

For me, "surfing" is Frankie and Annette with a dollop of the Beach Boys, so I was skeptical about someone making noir out of a happy sunny California sport. Well, this is very noirish and a great read. Much as I'm ticked at Milch for his part in what happened to Deadwood, I'm looking forward to John from Cincinnati.

Next up is The Road, where Cormac McCarthy takes on a nuclear holocaust.
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Old 09-24-2006, 11:23 PM
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I've moved seriously into a non-fiction phase, and I'm simultaneously reading a few different books.

I'm just finishing Guns, Germs and Steel. I'm about 3 pages from the end in the 2003 Afterword. Adding to the Jared Diamond fest I'm about half way through Collapse too. I found the chapters on the Norse in Greenland and Iceland very interesting.

I'm also reading The Long Tail. I first read about the article on which the book is based right here on the SDMB. I don't recall the thread, but to the poster who posted the link, thanks. The article was great, and so far so good on the book.

Last weekend I bought a book called The Lost Millenium which examines the history of chronology, and claims by some that we are not actually in 2006. It's written by a mathematics professor from the University of Victoria, and so far seems to be a fairly serious examination of the subject.

In the same section of the bookstore I also picked up a book that posits what life would have been like in 500 in Great Britain and Ireland. I haven't started it yet.
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Old 09-24-2006, 11:30 PM
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I'm currently reading:

Off the Main Sequence and The Number of the Beast by R.A. Heinlein

Burning Chrome by William Gibson

Ancestor's Tale by Richard Dawkins

The Elements of Style by Strunk & White

Bully for Brontosaurus, Ever Since Darwin, and The Mismeasure of Man by S.J. Gould

The Dragons of Eden by Carl Sagan

Don Quixote by Cervantes

Six Easy Pieces and Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feinman by Richard Feinman

A few dozen comic books

Buddha, Volume 4 by Osamu Tezuka

A Contract with God and Minor Miracles by Will Eisner

A Sci-Fi anthology called Greatest Stories of Science Fiction

Bartleby the Scrivener by Herman Melville

The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. LeGuin

and

The Tao of Willie by Willie Nelson

And I'm into them all enough that I made that list without going to look at the stack. And I know it's comprehensive. Unless you count the stack of National Geographics that I'm behind on.


And yes, I have really, really, really bad ADD. Thanks for asking.
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Old 09-24-2006, 11:38 PM
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I admire people who read twenty or thirty books at once. It's second only to my admiration of people who stack books all around their offices and homes rather than getting them back on the shelf. (Seriously--I really like this.)
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Old 09-24-2006, 11:51 PM
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In the last few weeks, I've read The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers, and Native Son by Richard Wright. I'm now working on An American Tragedy, by Theodore Dreiser. When this book is done, which is going to take a while because it's long and the writing style isn't thrilling, I will have read the top 21 books on that Modern Library list I'm always talking about.
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Old 09-25-2006, 12:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoshana
I admire people who read twenty or thirty books at once. It's second only to my admiration of people who stack books all around their offices and homes rather than getting them back on the shelf. (Seriously--I really like this.)
You wouldn't like it if you had to live with it. To paraphrase The Simpsons, "Nothing stubs a toe like Leon Uris."


Guin,
I really liked The Kitchen Boy. I just finished his latest book: Rasputin's Daughter. If you like The Kitchen Boy, I think you'll like this one, too.

Right now, I'm reading Mary, a fictionalized biography of Mary Lincoln. I've always had a soft spot for Mary, who I feel got the short end of history's stick, and this book gives a sympathetic portrayal. [Note: there are some issues in the book which sticklers for historical accuracy may decry.] I'm really enjoying it.

I'm also reading [/I]The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All[/i] which I'm not enjoying as much.
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Old 09-25-2006, 12:05 AM
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I'm short on fresh book right now, so I am rereading.
I just finished a short story anthology called Blue Motel. I am currently reading something from a forensic psychologist called Guilty By Reason of Insanity.

I'm not sure what I'll read next - whatever looks good that I forgot I had - probably some old Year's Best Horror or something. I do mean to reread The Raptor and the Lamb, which is a quite engaging comparison of how carnivores and herbivores are adapted to suit their various niches. I may also reread Tribe of Tiger, which is about different feline species, current and extinct (nimravids are coooool!)

I'd like to read House of Leaves but I've not picked it up yet. Most of my books are used, so it's hard to pay $20 for a new one.

Oh I did forget I was trying to find Deviant, which is a book about Ed Gein. I have it somewhere but forgot what it looked like. I should see again if I can't dig it up.


sorry.
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Old 09-25-2006, 12:15 AM
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Currently reading Gene Wilder's autobiography, Kiss Me Like A Stranger. I have the latest Discworld novel, Wintersmith and Robert Harris' Imperium arriving soon from Amazon UK
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Old 09-25-2006, 12:41 AM
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I've been getting a lot of reading done, and most of it within my self-inflicted novel niche - modern fiction by young male authors. I don't know why, but that's all I feel like reading currently.

On the train on Saturday I read The Conjuror's Bird by Martin Davies, and Sea Otters Gambolling in the Wild, Wild Surf by John Bennett, on my return trip last night. Short books, in fact, a little too short, as they didn't quite fill up my 2-hour journeys. Really enjoyed both.

I also recently finished The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon, which was a little fraught, but still a good read. Maybe that was the translation. Speaking of translations, The Dream Merchant is a YA novel by Isabel Hoving, translated from the original Dutch. Another good fun read.

The Highest Tide by Jim Lynch appealed to my inner beachcomber, trapped inland. A very good scientician's novel, lots of tidbits and a greenie message.

I'm sure there's more I've missed. Oh, one to avoid: Odalisque by Fiona McIntosh. Although it reminded me that reading bad fiction sometimes is a good reminder of what GOOD fiction shouldn't be like. Does that make sense? No.
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Old 09-25-2006, 02:18 AM
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I've almost finished The Constant Gardener, by John LeCarre. I loved the movie, and I plesantly surprised to find myself really liking this. My mum's a big fan of his, so I'll snaffle a couple more of his books of her bookshelf, see if I've found myself a new author to enjoy.

I've just started Sarah Waters' Night Watch. It's shortlisted for this year's Booker Prize, and I'd like to be familiar with a couple before they announce it. So far it's good.

At work I'm reading Black Dogs by Ian McEwan. He's quickly become one of my favourite authors, and when I finished Black Dogs I'll only have a couple more of his books before I've read them all.
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Old 09-25-2006, 05:32 AM
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I'm reading a title called Kreol, by author Gunnar Harding. It goes into depth with some of the most prominent characters in the pre-jazz era of New Orleans.

next title might be that Everything is illuminated which seems to be the hot thing in the litterary community.
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Old 09-25-2006, 05:48 AM
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Susan Orleans's Orchid Thief, on which the movie Adaptation was based.

I'm not engrossed.
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Old 09-25-2006, 06:03 AM
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My goal this summer was to finish three series by the first day of fall - The Dark Tower series, The Crown of Stars series, and what exists yet of The Young Wizard series - with a couple of days to spare, I did that.

In a very rare turn of events, I'm currently only reading one book: Idlewild by Nick Sagan. So far it's strange, and I like it


toadbriar, House of Leaves is one of the worst "horror" novels I've ever read (not worse book, mind you. It's just not a horror novel like claimed IMHO) but you can get for much less than $20 at Amazon and Half.com.
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Old 09-25-2006, 06:42 AM
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I just finished Spider Robinson's Very Bad Deaths. I love Spider's storytelling, and I'd heard him read the first chapter aloud at Necronomicon 2004 when it was still a work in progress. It's a different genre for him - suspense more than S/F (although there is an S/F element: Spider's favorite, telepathy) - but he pulls it off. The ending left the door open for it to be the first in a seriesanic , but it's a complete, self-contained novel, and I enjoyed it.

I'm currently reading a fascinating nonfiction book, Touched with Fire: Manic-Depressive Illness and the Artistic Temperament by Kay Redfield Jamison. As a person with Bipolar Disorder myself (as is the author), and on the "creative" side, the topic is very close to my heart, but it's interesting reading for anyone.
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Old 09-25-2006, 06:53 AM
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Currently reading 1776, by David McCullough. It's about a bunch of guys who did some stuff.

Just finished World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max Brooks (who also wrote The Zombie Survival Guide). Really impressive; the book is made up of "interviews" with survivors of a great worldwide plague of flesh-eating zombies, a couple of decades in the future. Brooks obviously did a tremendous amount of research to achieve verisimilitude in the first-hand accounts.
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Old 09-25-2006, 06:54 AM
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On the Metro, and other out and about errands where a book comes in handy, I'm just starting into a rereading of Asimov's Foundation series (as in, I'm about 30 pages into Prelude To Foundation).

In the home, mostly because I am one of those people who needs something to read on the toilet (don't judge me!), I am reading Wicked a half dozen pages at a time, and have been for about two months.
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Old 09-25-2006, 07:13 AM
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I just finished The Sister's Grimm: (book 2)

Although it is a children's mystery, I stilled enjoyed it and will read book 3. I bought it and read it because I was looking for something light to read.

I am slogging through The protector's war I bought it on impulse at Border's with high hopes, but it has not lived up to said hopes. It is painfully slow and I wholeheartedly recommend that you avoid it.

I just finished Ghost's of Albion It was a mediocre read, and I would not recommend it either way. I suspect that there are much better books to be found.
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Old 09-25-2006, 07:26 AM
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Raj, which is a history of British India.

The Plague Dogs

Turtledove's Blood and Iron

and Vinge's Rainbows End.

I've been very busy this month and my reading time has suffered for it.
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Old 09-25-2006, 07:33 AM
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I'm more than halfway through Homeward Bound, which looks as if it might be the last book in Harry Turtledove's now eight-book series on the War between The Race (lizardlike alien invaders) and the Humans. Overall very wwell done, with some weird alternate-history vibes (James Dean starred in "Saving Private Ryan", although the last name wasn't Ryan. And the aliens have a classic book whose title translates as "Gone With the Wind")


Next I'm going to read The Da Vinci Code, because Pepper Mill had a copy of it.

I've got A Plunge Into Space in my bagf. Jules Verne wrote the introduction. It's about a trip to the moon via a sphere coated with anti=-gravity material. (This book came out before H.G. Wells' "First Men in the Moon"!), and apparently features the same situation that showed up in Goodwin's "The Cold Equations", but over half a century earlier.


And I notice that I keep flipping through my copy of The Moon is a Harsh Mistrress, so I must be in need of a Heinlein fix, and I'll probably re-read it soon.
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Old 09-25-2006, 07:37 AM
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I'm anxiously awaiting The Blind Side by Michael Lewis, a story of valueing players in the NFL, centered mainly around the rise of the status of the left tackle.

Sports Illustrated and The New York Times Magazine both ran excerpts of it this last week.
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Old 09-25-2006, 08:09 AM
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I can only read one book at a time. Currently I'm reading Arrowsmith by Sinclair Lewis. I found a great set of Sinclair Lewis books when I was on vacation for $18. They were printed in 1945 and are gorgeous. So now I'm trying to read all the ones I haven't read yet. I'm really enjoying it so far; I'm about halfway through.
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Old 09-25-2006, 09:28 AM
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Quote:
You wouldn't like it if you had to live with it. To paraphrase The Simpsons, "Nothing stubs a toe like Leon Uris."
Oh, I know what it's like. I haven't hung around with voracious readers in tiny apartments for nothing.
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Old 09-25-2006, 09:39 AM
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Haven't read any of the other posts yet, I will, shortly. But I didn't want to forget what I had to say first.


I just finished a book called Riot. Basically, the premise is a romance set in the middle of the Babri Masjid/Ram Jamnbhoomi riots in India in the early 90's. The romance is secondary, though, at least to me.

I knew about the riots and thought it was eminently silly. For those who don't know or don't pay attention to news out of India (sadly, very common), basically the claim was that a great temple to Rama was torn down by the Muslim king Babar hundreds of years ago, and in its place, the Babri Masjid was erected. So the Hindatva - an extremist pro-Hindu India group - decided to collect thousands of sanctified bricks and march, asking the Babri Masjid to be removed and the Hindu temple to be re-erected.

The thing is, the book was written really well. I do not feel that the Muslims don't have a place in India, I guess. At the same time I do feel like - well, you have your own country now, right? You asked for Pakistan. You tore India apart so you can get your Pakistan. So why dont' you go there? Then, too, I understand that not all the Muslims asked for or wanted a separate Pakistan.

I also understand the Hindus on both sides. Hinduism has traditionally always been the one religion that does not claim to be the Only Way. So we should respect the Muslim viewpoint, and India is one, and should be that way. On the other side, the Hindus who want the Muslims out have some good points, too, although not concerning the Muslims. But when they stand up and say that India has always been shown to be less than what it is, I agree. When they point to people like Mother Theresa, who never fully understood our country, or to the Western media, which goes into the filthies slums of Calcutta and never shows any of the grandeur and beauty that is India, I agree, they are looking for the most dramatic points and not showing the true India.

i didn't mean to talk so long but the whole book really affected me. Particularly the descriptions of why each side came to the riots. The Hindu boys and young men, and why the Muslims reacted so violently. All in all the whole thing breaks my heart and also puts me deep in thought.
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Old 09-25-2006, 09:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrFidelius
Raj, which is a history of British India.

.
Is this worth it? After my extraordinarily long post re: Riot, I do want to read more.

On the side, I am also working on SOul Mountain as well as Murder on the Orient Express. A bit light these days, since this weekend I was knee-deep in playing Okami.
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Old 09-25-2006, 09:47 AM
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In addition to my various textbooks, I'm reading:

American Gospel, by Jon Meacham, a very well-written history of religion in America that includes primary-source documents dealing with religion and religious freedom.

And Folk Devils and Moral Panics by Stanley Cohen. It's a sociological case study of a series of incidents of minor vandalism and how the British public got worked up into a hysteria. It's for my thesis, and it's kind of dry, but it's still interesting reading.

Robin
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Old 09-25-2006, 09:50 AM
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My most interesting reads this month have been:

Fevre Dream, by George R. R. Martin. I loved it, and I bought a copy of A Game of Thrones, but someone suggested a collection of his sci-fi stories, Tuf Voyaging, so I think I'm going to read that next.

A Confederacy of Dunces - a classic I have always meant to read, and I enjoyed it.

The Kid and The Commitment, by Dan Savage. They're hysterically funny in spots, and really sentimental and touching in others.

Stolen, the second of Kelley Armstrong's Women of the Otherworld series. The first book was very good, but I was less impressed with this one.

At the used book store the other day I found a nice copy of Mrs. Mike, a book I read repeatedly when I was a little girl. I might read that next.

Quote:
Originally Posted by XaMcQ
Rachel Caine's new Weather Warden book: Firestorm, was sadly disappointing.
Hmm, I was thinking about trying the Weather Warden series. I like Kim Harrison and Jim Butcher.
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Old 09-25-2006, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Eleanor of Aquitaine
Hmm, I was thinking about trying the Weather Warden series. I like Kim Harrison and Jim Butcher.
I really loved the first three. Rachel Caine's webpage mentions that she's been in treatment for cancer, so I hate to be too critical of the way the series seems to have stumbled. It's just reminding me a little of the way Laurell K. Hamilton has gone to seed(well, not so much in the hard slide into all sex, no plot) in that she's embarked on a series and either not had a clear plan on how to get from begining to end, or somewhere along the line she changed her mind and is now floundering. Either that or she's decided to see how far she can string her readers along(which I do think LKH is doing), and I am not quite ready to think that yet.
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Old 09-25-2006, 11:47 AM
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A Well Regulated Militia by John Carpenter

Digital Signal Processing by Sanjit Mitra
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Old 09-25-2006, 12:15 PM
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Well, my Amazon order came, and so I'll add to the list:

The Worst Person in the World: And 202 Strong Contenders by Keith Olbermann. So far it lives up to the hype.

Have I mentioned how much I love Keith Olbermann?
  #37  
Old 09-25-2006, 12:57 PM
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Talking Right: How Conservatives Turned Liberalism into a Tax-Raising, Latte-Drinking, Sushi-Eating, Volvo-Driving, New York Times-Reading, Body-Piercing, Hollywood-Loving, Left-Wing Freak Show by Geoffrey Nunberg

Conservatives Without Conscience by John Dean
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Old 09-25-2006, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by MsRobyn
In addition to my various textbooks, I'm reading:

American Gospel, by Jon Meacham, a very well-written history of religion in America that includes primary-source documents dealing with religion and religious freedom.

And Folk Devils and Moral Panics by Stanley Cohen. It's a sociological case study of a series of incidents of minor vandalism and how the British public got worked up into a hysteria. It's for my thesis, and it's kind of dry, but it's still interesting reading.

Robin
You might also like Hellfire Nation, a history of sin and American politics. It's a very interesting read.
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Old 09-25-2006, 01:34 PM
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I just finished Englandís Dreaming, the ultimate story of punk rock and the Sex Pistols by John Savage and just started A Pickpocketís Tale- The Underworld of Nineteenth-Century New York which so far appears to be an expanded and annotated version of an autobiography by one George Appos, a career criminal growing up in the Five Points section of New York.

I stopped in the non fiction section of the library first this time.....
  #40  
Old 09-25-2006, 01:54 PM
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I just finished the whole of the Chronicles of Narnia, for the first time since I was about twelve. That was really very fun.

In theory, I'm also reading The Balkans, by Mischa Glenny, and The Autobiography of Henry Adams, but I haven't progressed very far in either book lately.
  #41  
Old 09-25-2006, 02:17 PM
Lamar Mundane is offline
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The Emperor's Children, by Claire Messud. A novel about three young people in New York in 2001. It uses 9/11 as a plot device, but only in a minor way. Messud is a brilliant writer, maybe the best new novelist I have read in a decade, but her half-page long sentences, full of semi colons and dashes, leave me exhausted.

The Miracle of St. Anthony, by Adrian Wojnarowski. The story of Bob Hurley, basketball coach at St. Anthony High School in Jersey City, NJ. A tiny school, abandoned by the church but held together by a group of dedicated nuns, educating the poorest of the poor, somehow manages to win 22 state basketball titles and send nearly every senior to college.

I have on order Letter to a Christian Nation, by Sam Harris.
  #42  
Old 09-25-2006, 03:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blondebear
Three Days to Never by Tim Powers. I always hoping that he'll come up with something that I like as much as The Anubis Gates. I'm about 40 pages in--so far, so good.
I just started the Anubis Gates. About 15 pages in, so no discussion points yet. I also just finished Drawing of The Dark by Powers.

I just ordered Pynchon's new one on Amazon (rotten pre-order!), and pre-ordered Gene Wolfe's new one (the name escapes me now, but it's in the Latro series).

Recently finished:
  • 1776
  • An omnibus work of Tom Holt's
  • Independent People (Halldor Laxness?)
  • Wind-Up Bird Chronicle (Murakami)
  • And.....tried Finnegan's Wake again (feeling arrogant), got through page 43!!!!

-Cem (who hopes one day to get into triple-digits on FW)
  #43  
Old 09-25-2006, 03:43 PM
Cemetery Savior is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baldwin
Just finished World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max Brooks (who also wrote The Zombie Survival Guide). Really impressive; the book is made up of "interviews" with survivors of a great worldwide plague of flesh-eating zombies, a couple of decades in the future. Brooks obviously did a tremendous amount of research to achieve verisimilitude in the first-hand accounts.
I'm going to get it tonight...didn't know it existed.

-Cem
  #44  
Old 09-25-2006, 03:46 PM
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I'm in grad school, goin' for the ol' English MA -- up to my butt in Victorian lit this semester. Carlyle, Coleridge, Dickens, Tennyson, Eliot, Mill, Bronte (both of 'em) and on and on and on. Enjoying it? Nope, but I knew it wasn't going to be fun.
  #45  
Old 09-25-2006, 03:53 PM
Mrs. Cake is offline
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Location: Central Iowa
Posts: 1,976
Currently reading:

Collapse by Jared Diamond, having recently re-read Guns, Germs and Steel

The Hedgehog, the Fox and the Magister's Pox by SJ Gould

Undead and Unwed by MaryJanice Davidson, a chick lit/vampire book for a little light bedtime reading

Also re-reading my Agatha Heterodyne books, if graphic novels count.

In the stack waiting to be read are:

Fluke having only belatedly discovered Christopher Moore and working my way through his novels

The latest Amelia Peabody book, the name of which escapes me at the moment

My semi-annual reading of Little, Big by John Crowley, one of my 10 desert island books.
  #46  
Old 09-25-2006, 04:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cisco
I'm currently reading:

Burning Chrome by William Gibson
That has one of my favorite science fiction short stories: Hinterlands


I'm reading 1919 by John Dos Passos, a sort of epic many slices of many lives around the time of WWI. The second book in his USA trilogy.

I took some time during my vacation to read The DaVinci Code.
  #47  
Old 09-25-2006, 04:05 PM
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I'm rwading Harry Turtledove's WorldWar/Colonization series. Tjis is what L. Ron Hubbard's Battlefield Earth wants to be when it grows up.
  #48  
Old 09-25-2006, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophie_Z
I'm rwading Harry Turtledove's WorldWar/Colonization series. Tjis is what L. Ron Hubbard's Battlefield Earth wants to be when it grows up.
This. This is what it wants to be.
  #49  
Old 09-25-2006, 04:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus
S. M. Stirling's A Meeting At Corvallis arrived last week, so it's currently being read. Next up will likely be Robert Rankin's The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse.
Being a cheapskate with limited shelf space (my books may be reaching critical mass; if a new black hole appears near St. Louis, MO, it's just my book collection finally imploding under its own mass), I'm waiting for the paperback, but The Protector's War came out recently, and I'm working my way through it.
__________________
"Get crazy with the cheez whiz!"
  #50  
Old 09-25-2006, 06:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrFidelius
The Plague Dogs
Assuming you enjoy the book, should you ever stumble across the animated film, I reccommend it. It's one of the few animated film adaptations I've ever seen that holds faithful to the novel.

For that matter, should you get sick of the book, the film is a good way to find out how the rest of the book goes in 90min

I'm currently reading A Concise History of Poland by Jerzy Lukowski & Hubert Zawadzki. They managed to boil 1,040 years of history down into three hundred seventy pages so I'm guessing that's pretty concise. I still need to finish Guns, Germs & Steel and a biography I have on Abigail Adams but the Poland book was bought for a research paper I'm doing so it got top billing.
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