Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-30-2007, 06:26 PM
Khadaji is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Southern Pennsylvania
Posts: 21,599

Whatcha readin' October edition


OK, I'm a day early, sue me.

I thought if there were enough interest we might start doing this monthly. I always enjoy hearing what others are reading.

I also want to encourage both positive and (courteous) negative feedback. I often am reluctant to speak up and say I didn't like a book that someone else enjoyed because I don't want to be rude. But a courteous discussion doesn't seem out of line.

I am reading Raven's Strike (The Raven Duology, Book 2). The first one started slowly but eventually I really enjoyed it. I'm about 1/3 done now and it is slow again. I'm hoping it picks up soon.

I've started Hannibal Rising. It too is very slow. The only reason I'm reading it is because I've read all the others. But I may put it down.

On deck: The last Potter book.

What are you reading?

Last edited by Khadaji; 09-30-2007 at 06:27 PM.
  #2  
Old 09-30-2007, 06:28 PM
Larry Borgia's Avatar
Larry Borgia is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 10,615
I just started re-reading Gravity's Rainbow.

I'm thinking of reading John Keegan's The Second World War as my non-fiction book, but I'm not sure yet. It's either that or Godel Escher Bach.
  #3  
Old 09-30-2007, 06:48 PM
sinjin is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,263
Just finished Broken Angels by Richard K Morgan, following his first novel Altered Carbon. Awesome sci-fi detective/battle stuff with a bit of Martian artifacts thrown in for color. Oh yeah I like me some Takeshi Kovachs.

Last edited by sinjin; 09-30-2007 at 06:48 PM.
  #4  
Old 09-30-2007, 06:54 PM
AuntiePam is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 18,119
A couple of mysteries by Elizabeth Sanxay Holding. I need to check and see if any of her books were filmed. The one I finished last night reads like a 40's movie. I'm picturing Robert Cummings as Hugh Acheson, the slightly judgmental (only he calls it being "observant") young man who won't let anyone get away with anything! It was almost comedic, lots of running back and forth, socializing with people who don't like each other, some misunderstandings due to hearing only parts of conversations, and a couple of husbands who wanted to murder their wives. Holding writes psychological mysteries. You know what everyone is thinking but even so, the books are full of surprises.

I don't know if it's a quirk or if it was the style in the 30's and 40's, but when Holding writes someone's thoughts, she puts them in quotation marks. It took awhile to get used to, especially when one guy was planning his wife's murder. "You're not going to get away with it if you tell her!" But he was just thinking. The quotes threw me off.

I'll be reading Carrie for the horror book club at SFF World, and then I'll probably tackle the three big fat Steven Erickson books that have been calling out since spring. Or I'll re-read The English Passengers, since koeeoaddi was kind enough to replace the copy I lost.
  #5  
Old 09-30-2007, 07:01 PM
Alice The Goon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Asheville, NC
Posts: 9,895
I just started Julie & Julia, about Julie Powell's quest (and blog) to cook every one of the recipes in Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking in a year. So far I like it.
  #6  
Old 09-30-2007, 07:28 PM
Stuffy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: the Big Valley
Posts: 4,432
I just picked up Salem's Lot and Lisey's story. I've never read Salem's Lot not being particularly enamored with vampire stories but I decided to give it a shot. Lisey's story was just to round it out my King reading.
  #7  
Old 09-30-2007, 07:32 PM
silenus's Avatar
silenus is offline
Isaiah 1:15/Screw the NRA
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 51,541
I'm finishing up a rereading of Roger Welsch's Love, Sex and Tractors. Next in the queue is either S. M. Sterling's The Sunrise Lands or Robert Irvine's Mission: Cook! Then the list gets kinda fuzzy....
  #8  
Old 09-30-2007, 07:44 PM
Sleeps With Butterflies is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 3,921
Before this summer, I hadn't read any of the Harry Potter books. Right now I'm near the beginning of the sixth book.

I'm also reading The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance
  #9  
Old 09-30-2007, 07:47 PM
Catamount is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: God's Waiting Room, NC
Posts: 9,817
Earthborn by Orson Scott Card. I'm finishing up the series. Pretty good stuff, especially now that the irritating sibling rivalry has turned into international warfare.

Crafting the Very Short Story edited by Mark Mills. This was one of the books used in a flash fiction/prose poetry course I took this summer. We read selections from it then, I'm reading the whole thing now. Great stories, but the critical selections should be in a separate section in the back I think.

A Pipe for February by Charles H. Redcorn. A story about the Osage oil murders in 1920s Oklahoma told from the perspective of an artist. Beautiful writing and a thoroughly compelling story.

The Professor and the Madman by Simon Winchester. I hesitated to pick this up because I read and hated The Map that Changed the World. I haven't started reading it yet, but I'm hoping that the promised linguistics and murder will be present, unlike the undelivered controversy in TMTCTW.

After this I'm embarking on a course of Charles de Lint and Adrienne Rich.
__________________
"I started To Reign in Hell, but was bored out of my mind." - Doomtrain
  #10  
Old 09-30-2007, 07:48 PM
CalMeacham's Avatar
CalMeacham is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 44,559
I just finished reading Dave Barry's new book The History of the Millenium (so far) and Frederick Forsyth's The Afghan, and am still reading a collection of Eric Frank Russell's stories, Somewhere a Voice.
  #11  
Old 09-30-2007, 07:57 PM
stucco is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 393
I'm reading Strange Piece of Paradise by Terri Jentz. It's Jentz's account of being almost killed by an axe-murderer while she's camping with a friend and then going back 15 years later to find the man who did it. It's pretty good so far.
  #12  
Old 09-30-2007, 07:59 PM
Shirley Ujest is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Somewhere in the Middle.
Posts: 21,387
I'm reading Dave Barry's History of the MIlleneum too. Love his stuff. I wish I could read it aloud to my kids but they they would be all screwed up on history for school. I love his 'history' books.

The Book of Ebenezer LePage . I'm not sure how this book came to my attention. Possible via the Dope, maybe a Farker or one of the sordid knitting forums I wallow in, but it is so far so good. ( Foreward and first chapter.)

The Yiddish Police's Union, recommended by many a doper, is next on the docket.
  #13  
Old 09-30-2007, 08:19 PM
Voyager's Avatar
Voyager is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Deep Space
Posts: 46,367
Just finished the fifth Thursday Next book, "First Among Sequels." My library book is "The Experts Speak" a collection of quotes from experts throughout history showing they got lots of stuff totally wrong. I'm halfway through Cryptonomicron, and I'm about to start "Wintersmith," latest in pTerry's Tiffany Aching series. Plus I'm working on my book for my next book review, not yet published (book or review).

Last edited by Voyager; 09-30-2007 at 08:20 PM.
  #14  
Old 09-30-2007, 08:23 PM
DudleyGarrett is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 2,187
The Alien Years by Robert Silverberg. My wife swears it's an excellent read.
  #15  
Old 09-30-2007, 08:23 PM
AuntiePam is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 18,119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirley Ujest
The Book of Ebenezer LePage . I'm not sure how this book came to my attention. Possible via the Dope, maybe a Farker or one of the sordid knitting forums I wallow in, but it is so far so good. ( Foreward and first chapter.)
Wonderful book! I haven't run across anyone else who's read it -- at least not since it first came out, back in the 80's.

Is it still in print or did you have to search for a secondhand copy?

ETA: I clicked on the link. Never mind.

Last edited by AuntiePam; 09-30-2007 at 08:24 PM.
  #16  
Old 09-30-2007, 08:27 PM
DudleyGarrett is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 2,187
Next up! Brave New World by Aldous Huxley -- can't believe I haven't read this yet.
  #17  
Old 09-30-2007, 09:11 PM
Shirley Ujest is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Somewhere in the Middle.
Posts: 21,387
Quote:
Originally Posted by AuntiePam
Wonderful book! I haven't run across anyone else who's read it -- at least not since it first came out, back in the 80's.

Is it still in print or did you have to search for a secondhand copy?


Library.

I'm a cheap read.
  #18  
Old 09-30-2007, 09:14 PM
susan's Avatar
susan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Coastal USA
Posts: 9,526
Quote:
Just finished Broken Angels by Richard K Morgan, following his first novel Altered Carbon. Awesome sci-fi detective/battle stuff with a bit of Martian artifacts thrown in for color. Oh yeah I like me some Takeshi Kovachs.
I dig these!

I'm reading The Map that Changed the World and maybe a couple of Jonathan Stroud's YA books this week.
  #19  
Old 09-30-2007, 09:20 PM
ivylass is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Orlando(ish)
Posts: 22,149
I just finished The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker. I gave it to my daughter to read, and I'll probably pick up copies for my SILs.

Now, it's back to the Dark Tower series...I'm on Wolves of the Calla. Yes, I read it, but I want to reread it in one big chunk.
  #20  
Old 09-30-2007, 09:26 PM
koeeoaddi's Avatar
koeeoaddi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: elsewhere
Posts: 5,901
Just finished White Bicycles: Making Music in the 1960s, by Joe Boyd, record producer extraordinaire. He produced all my favorite guys: Nick Drake, Fairport Convention, The Incredible String Band, Sandy Denny, Martin Carthy, Vashti Bunyan, Maria Muldaur, John Martyn, Richard and Linda Thompson, Taj Mahal. I liked it, but then I would. It was much, much too short.

Last night I started July, July, by Tim O'Brien and I'm listening to Water for Elephants, by Sara Gruen. So far, I like both of them.
  #21  
Old 09-30-2007, 09:27 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan's Avatar
Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
zymolosely polydactile
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Slithering on the hull
Posts: 27,345
I just finished Confederacy of Dunces and have started the new Garrison Keillor book, Pontoon.

I recently finished Pratchett's Making Money.
  #22  
Old 09-30-2007, 09:27 PM
pprgrl is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: the oniony towers of doom
Posts: 414
Just finished Saturday by Ian McEwan, which I really enjoyed. I'm starting Dante's Inferno tonight and re-reading Lady Chatterley's Lover, both for school. I just dug out my box of Pratchett books from storage so I'm probably going to pick up either Night Watch or The Wee Free Men for my for fun, not required reading. I'm also working on Diane Middlebrook's biography of Anne Sexton, which is not strictly required, but I'll be using it in a big project for one of my independent study classes, along with Searching For Mercy Street, which hasn't arrived yet. I'm a big Anne Sexton fan, so both of these seem more like for fun than required reading...maybe I'll hold off on the Pratchett for a few days until I've got the Middlebrook finished.

I hated Lady Chatterley the first time I read it when I was 18, and so far I'm not liking it much now. Sometimes I end up liking books like this after we talk about them in class a bit, so I'm hoping that'll happen with this book since Lawrence is so highly regarded and all.
  #23  
Old 10-01-2007, 04:00 AM
Panurge is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: København
Posts: 1,278
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Borgia
I just started re-reading Gravity's Rainbow.
Me too. For the first time, but man, is that an awesome book.
And I just finished Kafka's Diaries.
Next up: Max Stirner's The Ego and its own (Der Einzige und sein Eigenthum ).
  #24  
Old 10-01-2007, 05:26 AM
Enterprise is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Zamonia
Posts: 744
I just finished Ian Toll's excellent Six Frigates about the first purpose-built U.S. warships -- reads like a novel, really, an great read. I'll start The Line Upon a Wind by Noel Mostert on the Napoleonic naval wars next for my non-fiction fix, with Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose as a back up (some controversy about this one, it seems). For fiction, I have Mark Helprin's A Soldier of the Great War started, but it doesn't really grip me. I'm a bit disappointed that he's not come back to the walking part and keeps adding chapters on Alessandro's war experiences...it seems a bit disjointing.

Among the books I've put on backburner are Paul Auster's New York Trilogy, Gore Vidal's Creation and Norman Mailer's Naked and the Dead. Didn't really get caught by any of them, so they'll have to linger.

A plug for something I finished the other day: Mayflower, by Nathaniel Philbrick. Great book. I must get his other ones...
  #25  
Old 10-01-2007, 08:38 AM
Eleanor of Aquitaine is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 3,027
I'm reading the Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries, by Dorothy Sayers. I'm up to the fourth one, The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club, written in 1928. I'm really enjoying them.

I have ordered a copy of The English Passengers, since it's so popular in our goodreads.com Straight Dope group, so I'll be reading that soon.
  #26  
Old 10-01-2007, 08:41 AM
Annie-Xmas is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 56,035
I re-read Alice Walker's "The Color Purple" for the first time in about 20 years. That is one powerful book of sisterhood, let me tell you.

Then I started on the Lemony Snickert books, having gotten all 13 hardcovers at the thrift store for $10. If "A Bad Beginning" is any indication, that is one great series of books for children and adults, let me tell you.
  #27  
Old 10-01-2007, 08:45 AM
AHoosierMama is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: The edge of the earth
Posts: 495
Just finished Joan Didion's Year of Magical Thinking. Meh.

Just started Sue Monk Kidd's The Secret Life of Bees. Can't put it down.
  #28  
Old 10-01-2007, 08:47 AM
Stuffy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: the Big Valley
Posts: 4,432
Quote:
Originally Posted by DudleyGarrett
The Alien Years by Robert Silverberg. My wife swears it's an excellent read.
I read it back in May, I have to say that I disagree. I hate to play spoiler though so let me know if you're interested in my $.02.
  #29  
Old 10-01-2007, 08:55 AM
Dinsdale is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 18,620
Just about finishing McCathy's The Road. Nice cheery little romp. have to imagine Oprah's demo loved it. After a couple of decades of reading Cormac, this reader thinks he peaked with ATPH. (Actually, I quite like this book.)

Last 2 were worth reading as well. Dog Days by Jon Katz will please any animal lover or dreamer of a - uh - simpler life. And CC Pyle’s Amazing Footrace by Geoff Williams was an amazing and amusing true tale of a 1928 footrace from LA to NY.

Gotta hit the lobrary tonight and restock.

Of the books listed above, I strongly recommend anything by Winchester.
  #30  
Old 10-01-2007, 09:43 AM
Catamount is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: God's Waiting Room, NC
Posts: 9,817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoshana
I'm reading The Map that Changed the World and maybe a couple of Jonathan Stroud's YA books this week.
*glances askance at your first book*

You know, I think I would have liked that one better if the childhood reminiscense chapter came at the beginning or end of the book, not right in the middle of the 18th century action. But like I said, I'm giving Winchester another chance with the OED so we'll see what my verdict is when I start reading The Professor tomorrow or the next day.
  #31  
Old 10-01-2007, 09:58 AM
Geobabe is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Atlanta-ish
Posts: 4,338
Quote:
Originally Posted by stucco
I'm reading Strange Piece of Paradise by Terri Jentz. It's Jentz's account of being almost killed by an axe-murderer while she's camping with a friend and then going back 15 years later to find the man who did it. It's pretty good so far.
I found that one unsatisfying toward the end, but still a worthwhile read.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHoosierMama
Just started Sue Monk Kidd's The Secret Life of Bees. Can't put it down.
Loved that one. It's a female-bonding-coming-of-age story without being too "chick-lit" IMO.

My current one is To Hate Like This Is to Be Happy Forever: A Thoroughly Obsessive, Intermittently Uplifting, and Occasionally Unbiased Account of the Duke-North Carolina Basketball Rivalry by Will Blythe, which I got for my husband for Father's Day and get to read now that he's done with it. An interesting look behind enemy lines, since the writer is a Carolina fan.
  #32  
Old 10-01-2007, 01:18 PM
SkeptiJess is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Yorktown, VA USA
Posts: 3,343
Quote:
Originally Posted by koeeoaddi
...Water for Elephants, by Sara Gruen. So far, I like both of them.
Great book. I read it and loved it; passed it on to my dad, who read it and loved it; then my son, who read it and loved it. My mom is reading it now and... natch, loving it.

I just finished An Ice Cold Grave by Charlaine Harris. The most disturbing one yet, in this series. Very creepy.

Right now, I'm reading, In Secret Service by Mitch Silver. A spy thriller with the Duke & Duchess of Windsor spying for the Nazis. Not the best thing I've read recently, but not the worst, either.

Next up -- UltraViolet by Nancy Bush.

Last edited by Jess; 10-01-2007 at 01:20 PM.
  #33  
Old 10-01-2007, 01:29 PM
gigi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Flatlander in NH
Posts: 25,528
Right now, I am committed to seeing "Lisey's Story" by Stephen King through to the end. Not sure it's worth it.

Then I have to get back to Middle Age by Joyce Carol Oates. And on to the big pile waiting on the shelf.

The I got my head turned by faculty recommendations from their summer reading, in the alumni weekly: "Edward P. Jones’s masterful novel, The Known World", "T. C. Boyle’s utterly disturbing novel, The Tortilla Curtain." So I may have to hit Borders for these. Anyone read them?
  #34  
Old 10-01-2007, 01:36 PM
Tupug Anachi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Bluehairia
Posts: 4,207
Abundance by Sena Jeter Naslund, a novel about Marie Antoinette. Interesting but does nothing to develop any sympathy for the subject.

Rick Steve's Italy 2008 because I want to go to Italy next September. Frommer's Italy 2008 is also in the que.
  #35  
Old 10-01-2007, 01:53 PM
Catamount is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: God's Waiting Room, NC
Posts: 9,817
Quote:
Originally Posted by gigi
The I got my head turned by faculty recommendations from their summer reading, in the alumni weekly: "Edward P. Jones’s masterful novel, The Known World", "T. C. Boyle’s utterly disturbing novel, The Tortilla Curtain." So I may have to hit Borders for these. Anyone read them?
I've read The Known World. I spent the first few chapters confused about who all of these characters are and the rest of the book wondering why I should care about them.

I do have books I like. I really do. It's just that all the books I've read that are turning up on this list I didn't like.
  #36  
Old 10-01-2007, 02:05 PM
lalenin is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 931
The Protector's War by S.M. Stirling, it's part two of a triology, and I'm enjoying most of it, except that I wish the author would have kept all the prayers and bs about the "sky goddess" out of it, it really disrupts the flow.
  #37  
Old 10-01-2007, 02:31 PM
Khadaji is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Southern Pennsylvania
Posts: 21,599
Quote:
Originally Posted by lalenin
The Protector's War by S.M. Stirling, it's part two of a triology, and I'm enjoying most of it, except that I wish the author would have kept all the prayers and bs about the "sky goddess" out of it, it really disrupts the flow.
Maybe it was because it was a part-two of three and I didn't know it, but I did not care for this at all. I hate to lay down a book, but I think I ended up laying this one down.
  #38  
Old 10-01-2007, 02:50 PM
Suburban Plankton's Avatar
Suburban Plankton is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 8,099
I finished A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by David Eggers last night.

Next up: Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight by Alexandra Fuller, then The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson, and I can't remember what the next two books in the stack are...
  #39  
Old 10-01-2007, 02:51 PM
Flutterby is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Penumbra
Posts: 6,589
The last few months I've been having trouble getting through any one book, so right now I've got a couple on the go, some old friends and a couple new ones.

The main ones are The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss and A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin. I'm coming in behind the curve on A Song of Ice and Fire. It's been recommended to me more than once but until now I never bothered picked it up.

I've mostly been going the audiobook route and knitting as I listen, so there I'm thinking of listening to either The Three Musketeers or A Brief History of Time (yay for the library!).
  #40  
Old 10-01-2007, 04:18 PM
Enterprise is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Zamonia
Posts: 744
Quote:
Originally Posted by gigi
The I got my head turned by faculty recommendations from their summer reading, in the alumni weekly: "Edward P. Jones’s masterful novel, The Known World", "T. C. Boyle’s utterly disturbing novel, The Tortilla Curtain." So I may have to hit Borders for these. Anyone read them?
Tortilla Curtain may well be described as "utterly disturbing", but more for Boyle's sneaky racism than for anything else. I thought it was a good read, but like Drop City, it raised the occasional alarm in my head. I'll not go into it since you'll still want to read it; by all means, do read it, since it's very good, and then come back and tell me what you think.
  #41  
Old 10-01-2007, 04:25 PM
RikWriter is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: central Florida
Posts: 6,746
House to House by David Bellavia, about his platoon's experience in the battle for Fallujah in November, 2004.
  #42  
Old 10-01-2007, 04:28 PM
Freudian Slit is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: New York
Posts: 22,322
Shadow Family--A Japanese murder mystery by the same author of All She Was Worth
I just finished The Godfather. I'm also trying to get through Unholy Birth, a cheesy Rosemary's Baby type rip off. (Except this time they're lesbians.)
  #43  
Old 10-01-2007, 04:43 PM
gigi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Flatlander in NH
Posts: 25,528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban Plankton
The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson
That's on my "started but put back on the shelf" pile, along with "Cellophane" and "Gilead". Nothing wrong with them, I just got my head turned by something else.

Speaking of which, has anyone read anything by Valerie Martin? I saw a good review for her latest, Trespass, and saw that she won the Orange Prize for Property. Of course Ann Patchett has a new one too... Gah! Must wait for soft cover...
  #44  
Old 10-01-2007, 04:54 PM
susan's Avatar
susan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Coastal USA
Posts: 9,526
If we're talking "must wait," Robert Charles Wilson has a new one.
  #45  
Old 10-01-2007, 05:24 PM
DataZak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Malaysia
Posts: 603
Fiction: Pratchett's Making Money

Non-Fiction: Laura Thompson's biography on Agatha Christie, An English Mystery
  #46  
Old 10-01-2007, 05:57 PM
AuntiePam is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 18,119
Quote:
Originally Posted by gigi
Speaking of which, has anyone read anything by Valerie Martin? I saw a good review for her latest, Trespass, and saw that she won the Orange Prize for Property. Of course Ann Patchett has a new one too... Gah! Must wait for soft cover...
I liked Property but I wish I'd read it with a buddy. I was going "She did not just do that!" and "What do you think about such-and-such?" and "How realistic is this?" but I was talking to myself.
  #47  
Old 10-01-2007, 06:30 PM
Jodi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location:
Posts: 10,786
Today I read Kira Kira by Cynthia Kadohata. It's a Newbery Medal winning Young Adult novel. I thought it was great; very affecting and gracefully written.

Before that, I finished Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke. I loved it, but I can see why it would not be to everyone's taste.

Next up is The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse by Louise Erdrich, but I probably won't start it until tomorrow.
  #48  
Old 10-01-2007, 06:31 PM
silenus's Avatar
silenus is offline
Isaiah 1:15/Screw the NRA
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 51,541
Jackpot!!!!!

When I got home today, I discovered that the Postal Person had left not one, not two, but.......wait for it............seven packages from Amazon, Amazon.uk, and other purveyors of Fine Reading Material. So now I have to decide between:

Making Money - Terry Pratchett (UK Edition)

The Wit and Wisdom of the Discworld - TP

Mission: Cook! - Robert Irvine

Serenity: Found - Jane Espenson

1634: The Bavarian Crisis - Eric Flint

2 trade collections of PS238 comics

or the latest Nodwick collection.


Decisions, decisions. I think I'll save 1634 for reading at the tournament this weekend. The Irvine book will make a nice dinner companion while the wife is away. The comic collection go into the bathroom, and the Pratchett go into the pile by the chair.

Last edited by silenus; 10-01-2007 at 06:32 PM.
  #49  
Old 10-01-2007, 06:49 PM
nipplesup is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: shrek's swamp
Posts: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by koeeoaddi
Water for Elephants, by Sara Gruen.

I am in a woman's book group
a few months back this was the group's selected book
it was the first time in awhile that everyone loved reading the selected book

the animal cruelty took some air-gulping on my part .... in order to proceed with the story
  #50  
Old 10-01-2007, 08:43 PM
Just Some Guy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 3,444
For my reading of all of the Hugo winning novels I just finished Blue Mars which I thought had interesting terraforming science but utterly horrible characters, economics, and societal examination. Any radical economic system used in a science fiction book that requires the vast majority of a society to give up ambition, doesn't cause massive changes in day to day lives beyond the characters commenting occasionally on how evil the old ways were, and doesn't feature any rigid system propping it up makes me want to throw the book across the room. Longevity played a major part in the book but Robinson apparently kept forgetting just how much time he was dealing with; there were 65-year-old "renegade youths", a total of three generations across nearly two hundred years, and almost anyone who wasn't part of that first generation had nothing significant to add to events.

I'm starting on Forever Peace which I have not read before, but given that Haldeman could keep track of massive societal changes in Forever War it has to be better than that.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:22 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017