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  #1  
Old 12-21-2008, 12:06 AM
lissener lissener is offline
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Why does American mass-produced beer suck so hard?

Someone told me that nasty taste that cheap, mass-produced American beers (PBR, Miller, ad nauseum) have is because it's made with corn, instead of barley. Is that true?
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  #2  
Old 12-21-2008, 12:14 AM
RickJay RickJay is offline
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Originally Posted by lissener View Post
Someone told me that nasty taste that cheap, mass-produced American beers (PBR, Miller, ad nauseum) have is because it's made with corn, instead of barley. Is that true?
Mass-produced "pop beers" taste pretty much the same in other countries. No, they're not made of corn. They're just cheap and weak.
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Old 12-21-2008, 12:29 AM
gonzomax gonzomax is offline
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I have downed a few beers in my life. I do not like stout. I do not prefer dark beers but will drink them if thats all that is available. I do not like most of Sam Adams beers, A couple are OK.
I generally drink Canadian beers since I live in Detroit and can get them at the exchange. I prefer Molsons and Labatts.
If you want non mass produced beers ,you have to go to a local brewery. Some of them are pretty good. I like Kellys beer in Key West. She has wheat beers and a few others that are interesting .
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Old 12-21-2008, 12:34 AM
OneCentStamp OneCentStamp is online now
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In Budweiser and Bud Light, it's rice, not corn, being added to the barley malt. With Miller, it's corn. Either way, the problem is not the grain bill (though it certainly doesn't help), but the decision making process. The easiest way to get rich making a consumer product is to make the product as inoffensive as possible, and dark, bitter, complex beers are harder to get used to. Plus, most of America is hot as hell in the summer, and even guys like me often switch to light, refreshing lagers (though nothing by BudMillerCoorsHeinekenCorona) in the hot months.

Last edited by OneCentStamp; 12-21-2008 at 12:35 AM..
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Old 12-21-2008, 12:36 AM
ZebraShaSha ZebraShaSha is offline
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Why is almost everything that's mass produced and heavily marketed by a company that's worth a fortune absolute crap by a connoisseurs vantage?

SPOILER:
It's cheap to make.
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Old 12-21-2008, 12:44 AM
Vox Imperatoris Vox Imperatoris is offline
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Originally Posted by OneCentStamp View Post
In Budweiser and Bud Light, it's rice, not corn, being added to the barley malt. With Miller, it's corn. Either way, the problem is not the grain bill (though it certainly doesn't help), but the decision making process. The easiest way to get rich making a consumer product is to make the product as inoffensive as possible, and dark, bitter, complex beers are harder to get used to. Plus, most of America is hot as hell in the summer, and even guys like me often switch to light, refreshing lagers (though nothing by BudMillerCoorsHeinekenCorona) in the hot months.
Yes, this kind of beer is what the market demands, therefore it is supplied.

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  #7  
Old 12-21-2008, 01:02 AM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
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There is nothing wrong with mass-market beers. They are made with good ingredients, but are very light-because people drink them very cold. They are refreshing and OK if you drink one or two. If you like more flavor, a beer made with 100% barley malt , and lots of hops, is best enjoyed at about 40 F. I like all kinds of beers, and after a few porters, I'll have an American lager to balance things out.
By the way, you can make a decent corn-based beer, but they are usually sweet, as the fructose corn sugar is not 100% convertable by beer yeast.
As for wheat beers-they are OK (in the summertime).
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  #8  
Old 12-21-2008, 01:03 AM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Cheap Euro beer is crap too.
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  #9  
Old 12-21-2008, 06:40 AM
even sven even sven is online now
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Yeah, it's all exactly the same all around the world. Cheap beer tastes like cheap beer.

Why do people like them? They are cheap and they taste refreshing when its hot. Not everyone is into beer. Some people are just looking for something they can down quickly that leaves them refreshed and slightly buzzed.
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Old 12-21-2008, 07:25 AM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
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IMO it is the same reason that chain restaurants have bland food - they are trying to appeal to too many people. In so doing, they make a bland, average product that no one could accuse of standing out from the crowd.
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Old 12-21-2008, 08:12 AM
Pushkin Pushkin is offline
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Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
Cheap Euro beer is crap too.
There's some expensive crap in there too. Stella Artois, reassuringly expensive? Expensive yes, but reassuring? One reason I thought it was called "wifebeater" was the terrible hangover it gave me too.

Carlsberg too has a nice little catchphrase, probably the best lager in the world, that in no way matches it's taste.

And Harp lager? Brew with "pride" at the "Great Northern Brewery"? Tastes exactly as you would expect the Lagan to taste, if you strained the bits out of it.
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  #12  
Old 12-21-2008, 08:30 AM
Nom_de_Plume Nom_de_Plume is offline
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Originally Posted by Vox Imperatoris View Post
Yes, this kind of beer is what the market demands, therefore it is supplied.

Valete,
Vox Imperatoris

Yes, but it's important to remember that beer manufacturers made the market. The US at one point had thousands of small breweries, much like Europe did. The US had a market for a wide variety of styles of beers and could. During the prohibition years, most of the local ones had to close. Only the larger breweries survived prohibition. When they re-opened there were only a few breweries to serve the entire U.S. population. These breweries favored the lighter brews because of their mass appeal (and some researchers say that women preferred the lighter brews-- because so much of the US male population was off fighting the war, Rosie the Riveter and her associates were a larger share of the beer-drinking market as well as the workforce)
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  #13  
Old 12-21-2008, 08:54 AM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is offline
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Old 12-21-2008, 09:00 AM
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I'd read what Nom_de_Plume wrote somewhere else as well- in short, Prohibition wiped out many of the smaller breweries, and then WWII following closely behind meant that the beer they did make was aimed at beer-drinking women. It then caught on after the war, and the rest is history.
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  #15  
Old 12-21-2008, 09:34 AM
Cluricaun Cluricaun is offline
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Who else has tried that new Budweiser American Ale? That's mass produced and it's not the worst tasting bottle of Budweiser beer I've ever had. I might even go as far as to say that it's pretty tasty.
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  #16  
Old 12-21-2008, 09:45 AM
Laughing Lagomorph Laughing Lagomorph is offline
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Originally Posted by Cluricaun View Post
... it's not the worst tasting bottle of Budweiser beer I've ever had. ...

Now that's a ringing endorsement!

Seriously, I've been tempted to try this, I probably will eventually.
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  #17  
Old 12-21-2008, 09:58 AM
Baal Houtham Baal Houtham is offline
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I've got a story concerning the flavor of Budweiser, told to me a retired AB brewmaster. It's about August Busch, Jr. (1899--1989) --"Gussie Busch." (He was the colorful one who would often ride in parades on a wagon pulled by Clydesdales.)

Gussie came back from a vacation one year (late 1950's of early 60's I'm guessing) and said that when he drank beer with a lot of hops it gave him gas pains. And he decreed that Bud was going to have cut down on the hops (which is what gives beer a bitter flavor.)

The brewmaster, a fairly good friend and a serious person, chuckled when he told me this story, and said, "And that's why Budweiser isn't a bitter beer anymore, because hops gave Gussie Busch gas."

I'm more cynical than my friend was, and asked him, "Couldn't he have just made up the gas story because the marketing people told him that Bud had to be less bitter to compete? But he didn't want to admit that to the brewmasters...?"

The notion actually surprised him. "I hadn't thought of that," he said.
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  #18  
Old 12-21-2008, 10:10 AM
Hunter Hawk Hunter Hawk is offline
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Originally Posted by Cluricaun View Post
Who else has tried that new Budweiser American Ale? That's mass produced and it's not the worst tasting bottle of Budweiser beer I've ever had. I might even go as far as to say that it's pretty tasty.
Brief tasting notes from our local paper. They seemed to think it was a step in the right direction, but underwhelming compared to microbrews.
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Old 12-21-2008, 10:46 AM
Labdad Labdad is offline
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A fascinating New Yorker article recently profiled Sam Calagione of Dogfish breweries. You can find the complete article here. I found the following quite instructive:

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America used to be full of odd beers. In 1873, the country had some four thousand breweries, working in dozens of regional and ethnic styles. Brooklyn alone had nearly fifty. Beer was not only refreshing but nutritious, it was said—a “valuable substitute for vegetables,” as a member of the United States Sanitary Commission put it during the Civil War. The lagers brewed by Adolphus Busch and Frederick Pabst were among the best. In 1878, Maureen Ogle notes in her recent book “Ambitious Brew: The Story of American Beer,” Busch’s St. Louis Lager took on more than a hundred European beers at a competition in Paris. The lager came home with the gold, causing an “immense sensation,” in the words of a reporter from the Times.

Then came Prohibition, followed hard by industrialization. Beer went from barrel to bottle and from saloon to home refrigerator, and only the largest companies could afford to manufacture and distribute it. A generation raised on Coca-Cola had a hard time readjusting to beer’s bitterness, and brewers diluted their recipes accordingly. In 1953, Miller High Life was dismissed by one competitor as a beer for “women and beginners.” Within a decade, most other beers were just as flavorless.
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The strictures of the Reinheitsgebot have helped turn German brewers into the most resourceful and technically capable in the world. By mixing and matching strains of yeast, varieties of hops, and pale or roasted grains, they can produce almost any flavor found in fruit or spice. With three ingredients, they can give the illusion of a dozen.

The same discipline, if not creativity, has helped make Budweiser the most popular beer in the world. Its sheer consistency, across tens of billions of bottles and cans, is a technical marvel, and even the crankiest craft brewers harbor a secret admiration for it.
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  #20  
Old 12-21-2008, 10:47 AM
DrCube DrCube is online now
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Man, I don't get the Budweiser hate. I love beer of all kinds, and cheap canned beer definitely has its place. Among the admittedly inferior ranks of cheap canned beer, Budweiser, Pabst, and Stag rise to the top as the best of their class. Tasty and cheap is a hard combination to beat. I mean, hand-crafted microbrews are really the pinnacle of our society, and Bud pales in comparison; but so does Kool-aid and people still drink that. The trick is to realize that cheap beer is a different class of beverage, like Kool-aid, that shouldn't really be compared to ambrosia like [insert your favorite 'high class' beer here]. Taken on its own terms, Budweiser is pretty flavorful and refreshing.

But don't get me started on the foulness that is 'Lite' beer.
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  #21  
Old 12-21-2008, 10:50 AM
ExTank ExTank is offline
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Originally Posted by Cluricaun View Post
Who else has tried that new Budweiser American Ale? That's mass produced and it's not the worst tasting bottle of Budweiser beer I've ever had. I might even go as far as to say that it's pretty tasty.
Michelob Porter Ale and Amber Bock are two of my regular stand-bys. I think they taste just fine, and I've had beer from all over the world.

Have I had that one special, internationally renowned and critically acclaimed beer that you can onjly get from some obscure gasthaus in some remote village in Germany or Belgium? No.

But I've tried all the majors (Tsingtao, Kirin, Peroni, Guinness, Bass, Kiliian's, Beck's, Amstel, etc., etc.,) as well as some very, very good local one-offs in Europe, and microbrews that were sublime and some that were worse than mass-produced stuff. There's a microbrew/restaurant in St. Charles that apparently thinks any fermented beverage served ice-fucking-cold is "good beer."

I think a lot of beer snobbery comes from people deliberately bashing the "big boys" of beer in order to tout their local favorite, and therefore look like they're "cool, and in-the-know with the 'hip stuff,' dude."
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  #22  
Old 12-21-2008, 10:55 AM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
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Originally Posted by Cluricaun View Post
Who else has tried that new Budweiser American Ale? That's mass produced and it's not the worst tasting bottle of Budweiser beer I've ever had. I might even go as far as to say that it's pretty tasty.
I keep planning to try it, but forget when I'm buying beer.
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  #23  
Old 12-21-2008, 10:58 AM
Telemark Telemark is offline
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I think a lot of beer snobbery comes from people deliberately bashing the "big boys" of beer in order to tout their local favorite, and therefore look like they're "cool, and in-the-know with the 'hip stuff,' dude."
Which is why it's interesting that Pabst Blue Ribbon is becoming a "cool" beer again. I see it stocked (and often ordered) at some fairly hip bars, by the same people who also buy the most obscure micro-brews.
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Old 12-21-2008, 11:07 AM
ExTank ExTank is offline
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Which is why it's interesting that Pabst Blue Ribbon is becoming a "cool" beer again. I see it stocked (and often ordered) at some fairly hip bars, by the same people who also buy the most obscure micro-brews.
Pabst Blue Ribbon.

Maybe Miller tinkered with the formula some. In any case, it looks like a fashion trend coupled with savvy marketing is accounting more for it's comeback than anything.
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Old 12-21-2008, 11:32 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by ExTank View Post
Pabst Blue Ribbon.

Maybe Miller tinkered with the formula some. In any case, it looks like a fashion trend coupled with savvy marketing is accounting more for it's comeback than anything.
Yeah, I think that's a lot to do with it. That said, it can be a pretty damn decent beer. I was in Green Bay a few weeks ago and had a PBR from the tap that tasted positively delicious. Usually, PBR is an underwhelming experience for me, and I default to Old Style when I want a real cheap brew, since they are the working class beer of choice around here, and the kegs and bottles get turned around quickly, so you have a relatively fresh product. But I actually did a double take when I had this PBR and exclaimed to my friend, "Holy shit, this Pabst tastes great." And I don't think it was the atmosphere in Green Bay clouding my impressions.

But I wouldn't say all American mass-produced beer is pretty bad. I think Sam Adam's line of beers is solid, and, while I generally drink beers from Bell's, Three Floyd's, Goose Island, and Dogfish Head with regularity, I wouldn't cry if I had to be stuck drinking Sam Adams for the rest of my life. Their lager is one of the few I actually enjoy. I can't say the same of Budmillcoors.

Last edited by pulykamell; 12-21-2008 at 11:34 AM..
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  #26  
Old 12-21-2008, 11:38 AM
ExTank ExTank is offline
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I've always considered the Michelob line from A-B to be pretty solid, and it's only gotten better with the intro of Amber Bock and Porter Ale. They're not extravagantly good, but they are good, widely available, and reasonably priced.

On a side note: for the longest time, I read your screen name as "pukymel."
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Old 12-21-2008, 11:39 AM
silenus silenus is offline
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Originally Posted by Cluricaun View Post
Who else has tried that new Budweiser American Ale? That's mass produced and it's not the worst tasting bottle of Budweiser beer I've ever had. I might even go as far as to say that it's pretty tasty.
Seconded. This is the first product by AB that I have been able to tolerate. I actually would buy it again. It's not Sierra Nevada, but it's drinkable.

The main adjuncts used by American brewers are rice and corn. AB mainly uses rice, which is why their beers taste so bad to me. If you have ever had a beer brewed using corn as an adjunct, you would know it. "Corny" beers are very distinctive in their flavor profile. Midwestern super-cheaps were known for that taste.
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  #28  
Old 12-21-2008, 11:41 AM
Cisco Cisco is offline
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"Why does American mass-produced beer suck so hard?"

Because snobs say it does. Really. I like all kinds of beer. I've drank all the fancy American beers and all the imports, and travelled Europe and Asia and had their great beers in their homelands. They're delicious. But I still like American beer about 60% of the time. It's a different product, and when close-minded people from other countries taste something different, they immediately turn their noses up and say it sucks. A certain percentage of Americans are always going to agree with whatever Europeans say because they think that's the cool thing to do.

Oh, and microbreweries have been pretty aggressively spreading the "American beer sucks" meme for the last few years at least. It's marketing.
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Old 12-21-2008, 11:44 AM
silenus silenus is offline
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It's marketing.
No, it's the truth. Cheap beer is cheap beer, wherever you go. Mass produced anything has to appeal to the lowest common denominator, which means the first thing sacrificed is distinctive taste.
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Old 12-21-2008, 11:55 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Cluricaun View Post
Who else has tried that new Budweiser American Ale? That's mass produced and it's not the worst tasting bottle of Budweiser beer I've ever had. I might even go as far as to say that it's pretty tasty.
I have, and I can't say I'd ever drink it again. I prefer regular Budweiser to the American Ale. I don't know what it is, but there's just something off about that beer. It still has some distinctive Bud characteristics, but then there's this hop flavor that throws my brain and taste buds off, and I simply can't make sense of the beer. It's the grain-bill/body of the beer that doesn't work for me--it just doesn't feel right with those hops. That said, I am in the minority in this opinion. Most beer buffs say American Ale is a solid offering from Anheuser-Busch. I'd rather have a regular Bud or Old Style.

Last edited by pulykamell; 12-21-2008 at 11:56 AM..
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  #31  
Old 12-21-2008, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by silenus View Post
No, it's the truth. Cheap beer is cheap beer, wherever you go. Mass produced anything has to appeal to the lowest common denominator, which means the first thing sacrificed is distinctive taste.
You're saying it's not marketing for microbreweries to compare mass beers to piss, and put up signs like "Buttwiper" (parody of Budweiser)? And also that cheap beer is objectively bad? I disagree.
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  #32  
Old 12-21-2008, 12:19 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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You're saying it's not marketing for microbreweries to compare mass beers to piss, and put up signs like "Buttwiper" (parody of Budweiser)? And also that cheap beer is objectively bad? I disagree.
No.
No.
Yes.
OK.
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  #33  
Old 12-21-2008, 01:11 PM
smiling bandit smiling bandit is offline
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Originally Posted by silenus View Post
No.
No.
Yes.
OK.
Doesn't matter, you are objectively wrong, Silenus. It's uis part of their marketing strategy to diss mass-market beers. Signs and advertising that concept are also marketing. And unless you are very, very mutated, something's financial cost has no distinctive relationship to its taste.
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Old 12-21-2008, 01:20 PM
SmackFu SmackFu is offline
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Mass-produced "pop beers" taste pretty much the same in other countries. No, they're not made of corn. They're just cheap and weak.
I saw this interesting page with photos of the most popular beer in tons of countries:
http://www.sloshspot.com/blog/11-19-...n-116-Beers-80

Lots of pretty generic junk in there.
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  #35  
Old 12-21-2008, 01:31 PM
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So that weird, almost salty undertaste that makes PBR PBR and MGD MGD, the flavor that is missing from even similar but better beers like Tecate and Stella, that weird flavor that inspired this thread, that's on purpose? Someone thought that would be a marketing plus? I don't believe this.
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Old 12-21-2008, 02:18 PM
Snarky_Kong Snarky_Kong is offline
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Doesn't matter, you are objectively wrong, Silenus. It's uis part of their marketing strategy to diss mass-market beers. Signs and advertising that concept are also marketing. And unless you are very, very mutated, something's financial cost has no distinctive relationship to its taste.
Can't something both taste bad and be dissed by competitors?
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  #37  
Old 12-21-2008, 02:40 PM
RickJay RickJay is offline
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Originally Posted by silenus View Post
No, it's the truth. Cheap beer is cheap beer, wherever you go. Mass produced anything has to appeal to the lowest common denominator, which means the first thing sacrificed is distinctive taste.
But there's cheap beer and there's cheap beer. There's nothing special about Coca-Cola, but it sure beats RC Cola.

Reasonably good mass produced ales do what they do - refresh you and give you a buzz for a good price - along a range from not very good (Labatt's Blue) to reasonably good (Stella or Bud.) But if you want worse, brother, you can get a LOT worse. The real economy beers can be genuinely horrible. Lakepooooort!

Quote:
Originally Posted by lissener
So that weird, almost salty undertaste that makes PBR PBR and MGD MGD, the flavor that is missing from even similar but better beers like Tecate and Stella, that weird flavor that inspired this thread, that's on purpose? Someone thought that would be a marketing plus?
Well, it's not so much a marketing plus as it is a design decision. It's not like Miller comes out with ads saying "Miller Genuine Draft: For The Beer Drinker Who Likes Beer That Has the Aftertaste of The Stuff People Put In Their Swimming Pools To Kill The Algae," even though it does. But they've made a merchandising decision to make a mediocre but drinkable beer that fills a market niche for cheap, light, pop beer. Nobody at Miller has an illusions they're brewing up first rate stuff, just as nobody at McDonald's has any illusion that a Big Mac is equivalent to aged prime rib.
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  #38  
Old 12-21-2008, 02:50 PM
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Actually, I do understand all those marketing issues. But I really just wanted to know what made that taste: corn? or rat shit? or urine?
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  #39  
Old 12-21-2008, 03:14 PM
WarmNPrickly WarmNPrickly is offline
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I like it. I enjoy a good fancy brew once in a while too. In fact I brew my own. Sometimes a low alcohol low flavor beer is just perfect. In fact I'd say, most of the time it is. I really have trouble drinking beer with excesively high alcohol, I don't like the taste. I will make the exception for a very hoppy brew on occasion, but usually I very much dislike the bitterness of hops. Specifically, I hate the alpha acids, but I love the more aromatic betas.

If I like beer that appeals to the lowest common denomenator, then I'm not such a snob that I will pretend to like a beer I don't. I agree, it is all about marketing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lissener
So that weird, almost salty undertaste that makes PBR PBR and MGD MGD, the flavor that is missing from even similar but better beers like Tecate and Stella, that weird flavor that inspired this thread, that's on purpose? Someone thought that would be a marketing plus? I don't believe this.
Ironically, I would say it is Tecate that has a horrible flavor and Stella is just as much a tastless lager as anything else. I like Stella though. I don't like any beers from Mexico. Maybe Corona is OK, but I don't have any need to pay for it when I've got perfectly good Bud Light.
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  #40  
Old 12-21-2008, 04:06 PM
smiling bandit smiling bandit is offline
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Can't something both taste bad and be dissed by competitors?
Indeed it can, and if people limit their judgement to their own judgement, that would be different. But it's very much a conscious marketing technique.
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Old 12-21-2008, 04:28 PM
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Ironically, I would say it is Tecate that has a horrible flavor and Stella is just as much a tastless lager as anything else. I like Stella though. I don't like any beers from Mexico. Maybe Corona is OK, but I don't have any need to pay for it when I've got perfectly good Bud Light.
I understand that different people like different beers, but Tecate lacks that specific nasty taste I'm trying to identify, as does Stella.
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Old 12-21-2008, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by WarmNPrickly View Post
I like it. I enjoy a good fancy brew once in a while too. In fact I brew my own. Sometimes a low alcohol low flavor beer is just perfect. In fact I'd say, most of the time it is. I really have trouble drinking beer with excesively high alcohol, I don't like the taste.
[side note]Have you seen this article? You might find it of interest.[/side note]
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  #43  
Old 12-21-2008, 04:45 PM
Toxylon Toxylon is offline
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Count me in on those who doesn't appreciate bitter, hopsy beer, and would just as well drink beer that doesn't taste much at all. Certain moments in the summertime almost physically require a beer, and beer is a handy way to get a buzz going on the year round, but I'd never drink the stuff otherwise.
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  #44  
Old 12-21-2008, 04:50 PM
BwanaBob BwanaBob is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ExTank View Post
Michelob Porter Ale and Amber Bock are two of my regular stand-bys. I think they taste just fine, and I've had beer from all over the world.

Have I had that one special, internationally renowned and critically acclaimed beer that you can onjly get from some obscure gasthaus in some remote village in Germany or Belgium? No.

But I've tried all the majors (Tsingtao, Kirin, Peroni, Guinness, Bass, Kiliian's, Beck's, Amstel, etc., etc.,) as well as some very, very good local one-offs in Europe, and microbrews that were sublime and some that were worse than mass-produced stuff. There's a microbrew/restaurant in St. Charles that apparently thinks any fermented beverage served ice-fucking-cold is "good beer."

I think a lot of beer snobbery comes from people deliberately bashing the "big boys" of beer in order to tout their local favorite, and therefore look like they're "cool, and in-the-know with the 'hip stuff,' dude."

You can stuff that uninformed opinion. I've hated Bud and all the other mass-produced beers before the microbrew revolution took hold.

Liking that crap is like saying Hersheys is "good" chocolate. It may taste good to some but it isn't chocolate. Same with Bud.

I was in London when American Bud was introduced there. I gave it a try hoping that it was Bud in name only and that it was probably some UK beer with a Bud label on it. No such luck. It was the same bilge as we get here. It took two
UK beers to wash the taste out.

I pray that Unibrew (who I believe bought Busch) tosses the formulas away and starts over.
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  #45  
Old 12-21-2008, 05:48 PM
Cubsfan Cubsfan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cluricaun View Post
Who else has tried that new Budweiser American Ale? That's mass produced and it's not the worst tasting bottle of Budweiser beer I've ever had. I might even go as far as to say that it's pretty tasty.
I like it. It tastes nothing like Budwieser.
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  #46  
Old 12-21-2008, 07:16 PM
DMark DMark is offline
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I lived in Germany for over 14 years and trust me, I tried many brands of German and European beers.
I prefer Miller Lite.

Stop throwing things at me and listen for a second.

German beer is just so...so "heavy" and the alcohol content is insane. For me, it tastes far too syrupy and thick, and unless you just want to sip on one for awhile, you are gonna get blasted far too soon. I have seen Americans and Brits go into German bars at 10:00 PM and be pissed out of their minds by about 11:00 PM, thinking they can suck down as many German beers as the beer they drink back home.

I am not the only one. I have had some (not all, by any means) Germans come to visit the US and many prefer the Miller Lite or Bud Light beers. One tried to take a case home with him, but with the extra baggage cost, wound up giving it back to me at the airport.

Of course, if I were in Germany you wouldn't have to twist my arm to drink a regular lager in a bar, but I wouldn't be all that gushy golly gee about it.
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  #47  
Old 12-21-2008, 08:38 PM
Cluricaun Cluricaun is offline
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So this threat got me thinking, and I came home tonight with a case of Hamm's and a sixer each of Schlitz, PBR, and MGD. MDG is of course supposed to be an upmarket brand from the other three, but I can honestly say that I'd prefer any of the "cheap" beers over the up brand any day. Hamm's is sweet and bubbly, and the Schlitz and PBR might actually be the same exact beer in different bottles. Right now I'd rank them

1. Schlitz
2. PBR
3. Hamm's
4. MGD

The MDG is just insipid. There's not enough flavor of any kind to hang with the old school recipies of days gone by. I do dectect the salty undernote in the Schlitz and PBR that Lissener mentioned, but it's not offensive. All of these are hard core midwest corn beers and you almost get the feeling that you could distill them into really nasty tasting whiskey. These beers for that reason alone were born to be chasers, the maker of the boilermaker. I think I'll enjoy killing the rest of the case of Hamm's over the next few days and then I'll have to buy a few sixers of Longhammer IPA to balance things back out, but there's going to be a major resurgance of lawnmower beer in the casa de Cluricaun. They just feel right and swiggable and like you could have 7 or 8 of them no problem.
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  #48  
Old 12-21-2008, 09:35 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cluricaun View Post
So this threat got me thinking, and I came home tonight with a case of Hamm's and a sixer each of Schlitz, PBR, and MGD. MDG is of course supposed to be an upmarket brand from the other three, but I can honestly say that I'd prefer any of the "cheap" beers over the up brand any day.
I agree. MGD sucks. I don't think I've had a Hamm's in ages, so I can't comment on that beer, and I just tried the new and improved Schlitz two weeks ago at a local bar, and can't say I was that impressed (although I liked it better than MGD), but I agree with your overall assessment. I actually prefer Budweiser to all Miller-branded products (and that includes MGD, High Life, Miller Lite, etc.)
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  #49  
Old 12-21-2008, 10:09 PM
gaffa gaffa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickJay View Post
But there's cheap beer and there's cheap beer. There's nothing special about Coca-Cola, but it sure beats RC Cola.
I disagree. RC Cola tastes like cola, Coca-Cola tastes like high-fructose corn syrup. Given the choice, I'll go with RC.
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  #50  
Old 12-21-2008, 10:11 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Location: SW Side, Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gaffa View Post
I disagree. RC Cola tastes like cola, Coca-Cola tastes like high-fructose corn syrup. Given the choice, I'll go with RC.
Must be the Chicago connection. I loves me some RC as well.
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