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  #1  
Old 03-16-2009, 11:03 AM
NineToTheSky NineToTheSky is offline
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Does the full stop/period go inside or out side of parentheses?

I know I should know this, but...

does it go

(Inside.)
or
(Outside).
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  #2  
Old 03-16-2009, 11:08 AM
Nature's Call Nature's Call is offline
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It goes on the outside (at least that's what I recall).

"However," says my Grade 8 teacher, "the period goes inside quotes."
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  #3  
Old 03-16-2009, 11:16 AM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
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(Unless the entire sentence is inside the parentheses, in which case the period goes inside.)
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Old 03-16-2009, 11:18 AM
Exapno Mapcase Exapno Mapcase is offline
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Depends on the context.

On the outside if the parenthetical expression is only part of the overall sentence (like this).

(On the inside if the parenthetical expression is a full sentence on its own.)
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  #5  
Old 03-16-2009, 11:42 AM
Polycarp Polycarp is offline
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(This is a full sentence written as a parenthetic comment.)

This, on the other hand, is a sentence which includes a parenthetic remark (this is that remark).

Clear?
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  #6  
Old 03-16-2009, 12:04 PM
GorillaMan GorillaMan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nature's Call View Post
"However," says my Grade 8 teacher, "the period goes inside quotes."
This one's a matter of style, and tends to depend on your locality - the British usage places a full stop (or comma) inside the quotes only if it is present in that which is being quoted, and outside if not.
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  #7  
Old 03-16-2009, 12:21 PM
tullsterx tullsterx is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan View Post
This one's a matter of style, and tends to depend on your locality - the British usage places a full stop (or comma) inside the quotes only if it is present in that which is being quoted, and outside if not.
Exactly! . . . I think.

What about "so called" references? Like:

She really likes to hang out with her new "friends".
- or -
She really likes to hang out with her new "friends."

It makes more sense to me for the period to be outside.

Last edited by tullsterx; 03-16-2009 at 12:21 PM..
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  #8  
Old 03-16-2009, 04:41 PM
Ponderoid Ponderoid is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nature's Call View Post
"However," says my Grade 8 teacher, "the period goes inside quotes."
Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan View Post
This one's a matter of style, and tends to depend on your locality - the British usage places a full stop (or comma) inside the quotes only if it is present in that which is being quoted, and outside if not.
Nature's Call was narrating speech, and their example is correct as written in all English-speaking countries. The national variations that GorillaMan refers to only apply to quoting written material. When a quote is tagged with "said" or equivalent, the period (or comma, or exclamation point, or question mark, etc.) always goes to the left of the quotemark.

*** Ponder

Last edited by Ponderoid; 03-16-2009 at 04:41 PM.. Reason: grammar
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  #9  
Old 03-16-2009, 05:17 PM
Rhythmdvl Rhythmdvl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tullsterx View Post
Exactly! . . . I think.

What about "so called" references? Like:

She really likes to hang out with her new "friends".
- or -
She really likes to hang out with her new "friends."

It makes more sense to me for the period to be outside.
Most of the style guides that I use suggest a single quote mark with punctuation outside.

ETAdd an example
Quote:
Originally Posted by UN Style Guide
Punctuation

Single quotation marks

Single quotation marks should be used to enclose names of documents, themes of
conferences, phrases or specific words, terms, words being defined, radio programmes,
etc.

Punctuation marks fall outside single quotation marks.

EXAMPLE:
NPAs also reflect the international community’s growing acceptance of the need
for development to have a ‘human face’.

Last edited by Rhythmdvl; 03-16-2009 at 05:20 PM..
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