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  #1  
Old 03-31-2009, 10:30 AM
Khadaji is offline
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Whatcha Readin' (Apr 09) Edition


Happy April Fools. Will you play any good pranks?

I have finished Eragon and Eldest, which I reread because I received Brisingr for Christmas and realized that I did not remember too much from the first two.

At the end of Eragon I wondered why I ever purchased Eldest. However, I thought that in Eldest his writing matured and found that it was not a bad read. I have started Brisingr.

I am in the middle of Drood which is OK, but hasn't caught me enough that I am consumed with it.

Last Month's Thread
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Old 03-31-2009, 11:16 AM
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Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors, by Nicholas Wade.

Recommended on these boards by John Mace many moons ago, and I finally got ahold of a copy. So far excellent.
  #3  
Old 03-31-2009, 12:04 PM
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I'm finally breaking away from historical mysteries a bit. I've read a couple of YA books that I really enjoyed:

Harry Sue, by someone I can't remember and No Cafes in Narnia, by Nikki Tate.

I bawled most of the way through Harry Sue. *sniffle*

I'm in the midst of many a series.

Current reads (some are repeats from last month at this time):

The Sharing Knife: Horizon, by Lois McMaster Bujold
A Murder on the Appian Way, by Steven Saylor
Ship of Magic, by Robin Hobb
In a Sunburned Country, by Bill Bryson
The Vesuvius Club, by Mark Gatiss
Loyal Disloyalty, by Jeffrey Ashford

I'm going to read books by Mike Carey, Fiona Buckley, Sharon Shinn, Rob Thurman, Sharan Newman, Gerald Durrell, Lindsey Davis, Lee Jordan and Susanna Gregory in the coming days.
  #4  
Old 03-31-2009, 12:07 PM
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Just started Wild Ducks Flying Backward: The Short Writings of Tom Robbins. Very good so far. I've never read his short stories and essays before, and I can already recommend this for anyone who's a Robbins fan.
  #5  
Old 03-31-2009, 12:21 PM
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I have just finished A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson and liked it a lot. I'm now reading The Pursuit of Victory - The Life and Achievements of Horatio Nelson by Roger Knight and Gödel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid by Douglas R. Hofstadter. I'm at the beginning of both and both seem very interesting.

After I'm done with those I'll try Ancient Egypt - Kingdom of the Pharaohs by R. Hamilton and I'll finish Men, Women and Pianos - a Social History by Arthur Loesser which I was reading and stopped for some reason despite being fascinated by it.
  #6  
Old 03-31-2009, 01:20 PM
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I sat up reading half of Sandworms of Dune last night. It wasted no time getting to the exciting "what's gonna happen next" part.

Tried reading Ian McEwan's Saturday, bounced it back in the bookdrop after about 50 pages. It looked like one of those "stand around and pontificate about These Degenerate Modern Times" books and I got no patience for that. It was replaced with George Eliot's Felix Holt, the Radical because I do have patience for people standing around 170 years ago pontificating about Those Degenerate Modern Times.
  #7  
Old 03-31-2009, 01:47 PM
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Since my last post I've completed:

The Secret Voyage of Sir Francis Drake: 1577-1580 by Samuel Bawlf ~ Really liked this one, especially where comparing the older maps to the west coast of Vancouver Island.
Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War by Tony Horwitz ~ Highly enjoyable and a bit unnerving.
Refiner's Fire by Mark Helprin ~ slowly making my way through Helprin's complete works. Winter's Tale is still my fave.
The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski ~ Ugh. I'm positive that I've actually read this before but must have blocked it from my memory.
The Search for the Red Dragon (Chronicles of the Imaginarium Geographica) by James A. Owen ~ Second in the series. I wish the characters could be a bit deeper but I like the premise and keep wondering who's next to appear.
Sheepfarmer's Daughter (The Deed of Paksenarrion, Book 1) by Elizabeth Moon ~ I'm pretty sure this was a recommendation from this site. I liked it enough to want to continue with the series.
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson ~ Still keeping up with the classics!
Amber: Window to the Past by David A Grimaldi ~ A book about amber. (Really!) How it's created, the different types, uses in history forgeries, etc.
Bridge of Birds: A Novel of an Ancient China That Never Was by Barry Hughart ~ I've seen this recommended here a few times and will throw in my support. I did not want to put this down!

Presently reading:

Heartsblood: Hunting, Spirituality, and Wildness in America by David Petersen ~ I'm nibbling at this one and loving it. It gives me lots to ponder.
Adventures of a Mountain Man: The Narrative of Zenas Leonard
A History of Dogs in the Early Americas by Marion Schwartz
The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
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Old 03-31-2009, 02:04 PM
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Ship of Magic, by Robin Hobb
I absolutely adored the Liveships trilogy. What a great concept.

I'm still reading Sweetsmoke by David Fuller. Sweetsmoke is a tobacco plantation, and it's 1862. The main character is Cassius, a slave who is trying to find out who killed his friend, a free black woman. It's the best book I've read from the slave's point of view. Lots of insight into the different relationships. Nobody is "evil" or "good", but it's not a whitewash either.

The parts I'm enjoying most are Cassius reading Julius Caesar, trying to find out why his owner gave him the name Cassius, trying to figure out if Cassius is an honorable man, and what honor means.

Next up is probably A Mercy by Toni Morrison.
  #9  
Old 03-31-2009, 02:11 PM
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Sigh. I bailed on Drood. It never grabbed me, and I just couldn't get in tune with either the narrator or Dickens as anything more than a poorly written character. I'll let it sit for a while and give it another whack this fall.

Currently re-reading the Science of the Discworld books, as well as Contagious by Scott Sigler. It's a sequel to Infected that came out last year. About an alien invasion with viruses as opposed to spaceships. The first book was very faced paced and engrossing, I finished it in a couple of days. The new one hasn't grabbed me with the same intensity, but I'm willing to give it a chance.

I'm kind of in a rut with my bookreading. Nothing seems to be enjoyable, and I'm not really looking particularly forward to any new releases.

Which brings me to a question...

Where is the best place to see new and upcomming releases? I've tried to google it, but keep coming up with individual publishers pages. Is there a clearing house for this sort of news? amazon seems to beno real help.

Thanks!

Yancey
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Old 03-31-2009, 04:05 PM
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Where is the best place to see new and upcomming releases? I've tried to google it, but keep coming up with individual publishers pages. Is there a clearing house for this sort of news? amazon seems to beno real help.
Aha! Another opportunity for me to plug Bookmarks Magazine. It's published bi-monthly and there's good stuff at the website too -- bookmarksmagazine.com. They compile reviews from lots of sources. Very few ads, and they do at least 50 books in each issue. Fiction -- literary, crime, and SF, and nonfiction -- general, biography, history, and science. Good articles too.

Another resource is the NY Times. I signed up for an e-mail that comes in every Friday with several book reviews.

I agree. Amazon's no help.
  #11  
Old 03-31-2009, 04:07 PM
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I'm currently working my way through the complete works of St. Augustine. I should be done some time in the next day or two.
  #12  
Old 03-31-2009, 04:30 PM
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As part of my year long and getting longer attempt to read nothing but dystopian fiction, I'm currently reading The Fifth Sacred Thing by Starhawk. Now, this is not the worst book I have read since starting this whole dystopian thing, but let me put it this way: my vegetarian, yoga-doing, flowing skirt wearing, sandlewood musk scented sister saw it on my coffee table, rolled her eyes, and said, "Gawd, that book is too hippie even for me."
  #13  
Old 03-31-2009, 04:49 PM
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I just finished The Graveyard Book, by Neil Gaiman. Enjoyed it a lot. Interesting premise, interesting characters.
  #14  
Old 03-31-2009, 05:23 PM
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The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski ~ Ugh. I'm positive that I've actually read this before but must have blocked it from my memory.
I made it through four chapters of that before the waves of nausea overwhelmed me. It was more disgusting than Kathy Acker's work and I thought that was the pinnacle of nastiness. Clearly I have led a sheltered life.
  #15  
Old 04-01-2009, 07:49 AM
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Just finished "The Yiddish Policeman's Union" by Michael Chabon. Interesting read ... and a lot to digest. I may go back to it again.

Next up is ... yes ... "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies." It's an interesting concept, but I worry that it will turn out to be a one-joke book. I'm wondering if the author is going to be able to keep it interesting throughout the whole novel.

If I give up on that it's on to the biography of Mark Twain by Ron Powers.
  #16  
Old 04-01-2009, 08:03 AM
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Just starting Blue Smoke and Murder by Elizabeth Lowell.
  #17  
Old 04-01-2009, 08:03 AM
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Just started The Crimson Petal and the White. I can only read over my lunch hour, so I should be done within the next decade or so.
  #18  
Old 04-01-2009, 08:29 AM
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There are parts you shouldn't read out loud in the break room at work.

Or let the boss read over your shoulder.
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Old 04-01-2009, 08:53 AM
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...Tried reading Ian McEwan's Saturday, bounced it back in the bookdrop after about 50 pages. It looked like one of those "stand around and pontificate about These Degenerate Modern Times" books and I got no patience for that....
Most of my wife's book club had the same reaction.

I'm enjoying The Pistol Poets by Victor Gischler, a comic crime novel about thugs, undergrads, drugs and bad amateur poetry at an Oklahoma cow college. I'd read Gischler's Gun Monkeys a few years ago and it was equally good.

I'm also reading The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Black Dossier by Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill. It's not as good as the first volume of the series, but it has its moments. It's fun to spot the literary allusions sprinkled throughout; more sex than the previous two books, too.

I hope to get to Joseph Ellis's history American Creation and John Scalzi's sf novel The Last Colony this month, but I've been so busy I suspect I won't.
  #20  
Old 04-01-2009, 09:13 AM
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I'm taking a break from my obsessive run through the Saint-Germain vampire books. Some nice historical fiction there, actually, and a wide variety of periods and places with which I'm largely unfamiliar.

I'm reading the last of the No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency book, The Good Husband of Zebra Drive. So far it's not a standout of the series.

I need to read Honor Harrington # 10, War of Honor, but the reviews of it are discouraging.
  #21  
Old 04-01-2009, 10:34 AM
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Aha! Another opportunity for me to plug Bookmarks Magazine. It's published bi-monthly and there's good stuff at the website too -- bookmarksmagazine.com. They compile reviews from lots of sources. Very few ads, and they do at least 50 books in each issue. Fiction -- literary, crime, and SF, and nonfiction -- general, biography, history, and science. Good articles too.

Another resource is the NY Times. I signed up for an e-mail that comes in every Friday with several book reviews.

I agree. Amazon's no help.
Bookmarks! I keep forgetting about them. I just signed up for a subscription today.

yay, Auntie Pam!
  #22  
Old 04-01-2009, 11:09 AM
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I'm also reading The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Black Dossier by Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill. It's not as good as the first volume of the series, but it has its moments. It's fun to spot the literary allusions sprinkled throughout; more sex than the previous two books, too.
The first part of Volume 3 has just been/is about to be released.

I finished Sandworms yesterday. I liked it. I especially liked how it tied everything together, especially why Duncan Idaho kept being reincarnated. That always bothered me in the original series. However, I did find the bits with Murbella kind of boring. If Frank Herbert had written the last book, I'm sure he would have had lots to do with her and the New Sisterhood, but since his son isn't as much into Lofty Social Commentary she just kind of hung around and got duped by everyone in the Old Empire.
  #23  
Old 04-01-2009, 11:38 AM
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I just finished Vol. 1 of 'League of Extraordinary Gentlemen', and really enjoyed it, except for two things: I needed subtitles for the panels and panels of Chinese/Arabic scripts, and I kept expecting Mina to bite someone, especially when she was in dire danger. I was surprised at how much it was unlike the movie, which I loved. I'm trying to track down the second volume at a reasonable price.
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Old 04-01-2009, 12:42 PM
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I have been reading Charlaine Harris' Lily Bard Mysteries. I think Harris is such a good writer that I keep reading the series, despite the fact that they are so depressing compared to her Sookie Stackhouse novels. I have the third book in the series, but needed a break before I began it, so I read the following:

Dog on it by Spencer Quinn - an interesting mystery told through the eyes of a PI's dog

Glass Books of the Dream Eaters - Volume One by Gordon Dahlquist -- Actually just started this one. It turns out to be pretty different than I expected. I expected more Sci-fi, but it seems to be romance as well. I'll probably give it time since it's already piqued my interest. Anyone who's read it: Is it worth continuing?

Of course, I'm anxiously awaiting the new Harry Dresden and Sookie Stackhouse books due out this month and next month respectively.

Last edited by Nom_de_Plume; 04-01-2009 at 12:45 PM.
  #25  
Old 04-01-2009, 01:04 PM
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Bookmarks! I keep forgetting about them. I just signed up for a subscription today.

yay, Auntie Pam!
Cool! I've bought several books based on their reviews -- books I hadn't heard about anywhere else.

Each issue has a Year in Books page looking back at award winners, best sellers, and notable books from that year. A good reminder about older books that I missed out on.

NY Times bestsellers from 1965: The Source, Up the Down Staircase, The Green Berets, Hotel, The Looking Glass War.

1965 Notables: Tarzan and the Castaways (!), In Cold Blood, The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, The Millstone, The Man With the Golden Gun, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, The Painted Bird, Ariel, God Bless You Mr. Rosewater.

1965 Award Winners: Nobel -- Mikhail Sholokhov, Pulitzer -- The Keepers of the House, Pulitzer NF - O Strange New World, NBA - Herzog, Edgar - The Spy Who Came in From the Cold, Hugo - The Wanderer, Nebula - Dune, Newbery - Shadow of a Bull, Caldecott - May I Bring A Friend?

Who doesn't like wandering around in the past?

Last edited by AuntiePam; 04-01-2009 at 01:05 PM.
  #26  
Old 04-01-2009, 02:30 PM
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I just finished Vol. 1 of 'League of Extraordinary Gentlemen', and really enjoyed it, except for two things: I needed subtitles for the panels and panels of Chinese/Arabic scripts, and I kept expecting Mina to bite someone, especially when she was in dire danger. I was surprised at how much it was unlike the movie, which I loved. I'm trying to track down the second volume at a reasonable price.
You need Notes on the League. Heck, I need Notes on the League.
  #27  
Old 04-01-2009, 03:06 PM
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I'm reading The Double Bind which weaves in fictional characters from The Great Gatsby. It seems like a violation but then I remember that The Double Bind is also fiction.

Reminds me of Atonement

SPOILER:
when I felt betrayed that the whole book turned out to be "fiction", when the whole book is already fiction. Layers of fiction bug me. Or like when they reveal in the last page that the whole story you invested time and thought on was an alternate reality and the person died back on page one...how can I really be betrayed when none of it was really True? But I am...
  #28  
Old 04-01-2009, 03:55 PM
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I just finished Le Guin's sixth Earthsea book The Other Wind. It had the problems you'd expect from a sequel to an author's popular work written after decades have passed. On the other hand it didn't have the hateful "All men hate and fear women and are trying to keep them down" overt message that Tehanu did so it's offensive like the last Earthsea book I read.

The next year there was a tie for the World Fantasy Award so I've got a choice between two books: The Facts of Life by Graham Joyce and Ombria in Shadows by Patricia McKillip and they sound about as different as two fantasy novels can be. I'm open to suggestions on which one I should go for next.
  #29  
Old 04-02-2009, 11:34 PM
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I finally ditched the second Company novel by Kage Baker, Sky Coyote. As much as I enjoyed In the Garden of Iden, I just couldn't get interested in this one. I think there was maybe too much cuteness.

I've just started The Shadow Year, by Jeffrey Ford. I like the feeling of it so far.
  #30  
Old 04-03-2009, 03:15 AM
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Well I'm a one book at a time guy.....

Just finished Adventure on the High Teas: in search of middle England by Stuart Maconie and have now started The Accord by Keith Brooke (not quite sure what to expect, picked it up mainly because of the cover - dunno why)
  #31  
Old 04-03-2009, 05:57 AM
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Right now I'm reading Getting What You Came For: The Smart Students' Guide to Earning a Masters or Ph.D. It's a very practical and informative book that takes the mystery out of the whole process.

I'm also reading Oliver Sacks' The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat, which is a case-history based neuropsych book about disorders of the right hemisphere (to oversimplify, the ''integration'' hemisphere.) He basically outlines the most bizarre cases he's seen through a series of anecdotes. The book is very literary and humorous, not at all the style you'd expect from a neuroscientist. So far I've only read the first chapter but already I would recommend it.

My favorite bit so far, about a man who can see only in the abstract:

Quote:
I had stopped at a florist on my way to his apartment and bought myself an extravagant red rose for my buttonhole. Now I removed this and handed it to him. He took it like a botanist or morphologist given a specimen, not like a person given a flower.

''About six inches in length,'' he commented. ''A convoluted red form with a linear green attachment.''

''Yes,'' I said encouragingly, 'and what do you think it is, Dr. P?''

''Not easy to say.'' He seemed perplexed. ''It lacks the simple symmetry of the Platonic solids, although it may have a higher symmetry of its own... I think this could be an inflorescence or flower.''

''Could be?'' I queried.

''Could be,'' he confirmed.
Only when he smells the flower does he realize what it is and react accordingly. How neat is that?
  #32  
Old 04-03-2009, 08:31 AM
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I'm also reading Oliver Sacks' The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat...
I read this last year and liked it quite a bit.

Right now, I'm reading The Suicide Collectors by David Oppegaard. In the future, the world is stricken by a disease called The Despair, which causes people to commit suicide. About 90% of the population is affected, leaving the remaining 10% to try to survive while fighting off The Collectors. The Collectors swoop in and take the bodies of recent suicides... for what purpose, no one knows. It's good, although certain passages are quite disturbing.
  #33  
Old 04-03-2009, 08:41 AM
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Just started The Crimson Petal and the White. I can only read over my lunch hour, so I should be done within the next decade or so.
Yay! I love this one. You should post a discussion thread when you're done. I did a few years ago and not many people had read it.

I've put Drood aside too. It's not pulling me in like The Terror did. I don't think anything can live up to that one though. I'm currently reading Lost City of Z and it's an incredible book--reads like an adventure novel except that it's all true.

I just finished The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins. It's the best book I've read yet this year, by far. It's a favorite of Stephen King's and no wonder because it's basically Stephen King lite. Post-apocalyptic and reminds me of The Long Walk and The Most Dangerous Game. It's a YA novel but don't let that stop you from reading it. http://www.amazon.com/Hunger-Games-S...8765919&sr=8-1

Has anyone read One Second After by William Forstchen? I've managed to track down a used copy on amazon but it seems to be backordered everywhere else. I read a couple of reviews and couldn't resist since it's another post-apocalyptic novel I haven't read yet. I can't seem to restrain myself from those.
  #34  
Old 04-03-2009, 09:14 AM
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I just finished The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins. It's the best book I've read yet this year, by far. It's a favorite of Stephen King's and no wonder because it's basically Stephen King lite. Post-apocalyptic and reminds me of The Long Walk and The Most Dangerous Game. It's a YA novel but don't let that stop you from reading it. http://www.amazon.com/Hunger-Games-S...8765919&sr=8-1
Sounds intriguing. Thank you.
  #35  
Old 04-03-2009, 09:34 AM
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...Has anyone read One Second After by William Forstchen? I've managed to track down a used copy on amazon but it seems to be backordered everywhere else. I read a couple of reviews and couldn't resist since it's another post-apocalyptic novel I haven't read yet. I can't seem to restrain myself from those.
I hadn't heard of it before, but it sounds good. Forstchen wrote several Lost Regiment sf books about a Civil War infantry regiment whisked away by a spatial anomaly to a barbaric alien world, and they're pretty good. He also cowrote several alt-hist Civil War and WW2 books with Newt Gingrich that I haven't read, but some of my buddies like them.

Last edited by Elendil's Heir; 04-03-2009 at 09:35 AM.
  #36  
Old 04-03-2009, 10:45 AM
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I have been reading Charlaine Harris' Lily Bard Mysteries. I think Harris is such a good writer that I keep reading the series, despite the fact that they are so depressing compared to her Sookie Stackhouse novels. I have the third book in the series, but needed a break before I began it...
Is the protagonist a woman who had a terrible childhood, or a past history of abuse? That seems to be a theme in her work. I like the Sookie books pretty well, but everything else I've read by Harris has been positively grim.

Quote:
Originally Posted by olivesmarch4th View Post
I'm also reading Oliver Sacks' The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat, which is a case-history based neuropsych book about disorders of the right hemisphere (to oversimplify, the ''integration'' hemisphere.) He basically outlines the most bizarre cases he's seen through a series of anecdotes. The book is very literary and humorous, not at all the style you'd expect from a neuroscientist. So far I've only read the first chapter but already I would recommend it.
That sounds interesting, it's going on my wish list.
  #37  
Old 04-03-2009, 11:31 AM
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Just started The Crimson Petal and the White. I can only read over my lunch hour, so I should be done within the next decade or so.
That's one of my favorites! Last month, I listened to the audiobook while at work -- it's 42 hours long, but the narrator reads pretty slowly, so it should take you much less time to sight-read your way through it.

And actually, I just finished reading The Apple, which is Faber's companion piece to The Crimson Petal, comprised of short stories focusing on a different character from the novel. The last story in particular clears up some of the questions regarding the novel's ending.

(On preview: I'd be totally up for a discussion thread on The Crimson Petal. I have some questions about Henry I want to ask...)

Continuing the Michel Faber theme, I'm reading his latest book, The Fire Gospel, and I have to say, I'm disappointed. I'm about 20 pages from the end (I only read it on my lunch break, otherwise I'd get through it in an afternoon), and at this point I feel like Faber's rubbing his hands in glee and whispering, "Ever get the feeling you've been had?" in my ear.
  #38  
Old 04-03-2009, 11:35 AM
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Is the protagonist a woman who had a terrible childhood, or a past history of abuse? That seems to be a theme in her work. I like the Sookie books pretty well, but everything else I've read by Harris has been positively grim.
Good call, Eleanor. She is
SPOILER:
victim of a violent rape


Not sure if it really has to be spoilered. It's not revealed early in the very beginning, but not at the very end. Better to play it safe though; if Ms Harris browses the boards I wouldn't want to piss her off.

Last edited by Nom_de_Plume; 04-03-2009 at 11:38 AM.
  #39  
Old 04-03-2009, 11:36 AM
Shirley Ujest is offline
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Pride and Prejudice and Zombies is now MINE!

I rarely buy books, but I couldn't pass this one up at all.


Elizabeth Bennett and Zombies! Who could ask for anything more?
  #40  
Old 04-03-2009, 11:49 AM
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I got Diary of a Young Girl from the library yesterday. I remember reading passages from it and watching the movie back in middle school, but I've never read the actual book.
  #41  
Old 04-03-2009, 12:13 PM
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Yay! I love this one. You should post a discussion thread when you're done. I did a few years ago and not many people had read it.

I've put Drood aside too. It's not pulling me in like The Terror did. I don't think anything can live up to that one though. I'm currently reading Lost City of Z and it's an incredible book--reads like an adventure novel except that it's all true.

I just finished The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins. It's the best book I've read yet this year, by far. It's a favorite of Stephen King's and no wonder because it's basically Stephen King lite. Post-apocalyptic and reminds me of The Long Walk and The Most Dangerous Game. It's a YA novel but don't let that stop you from reading it. http://www.amazon.com/Hunger-Games-S...8765919&sr=8-1

Has anyone read One Second After by William Forstchen? I've managed to track down a used copy on amazon but it seems to be backordered everywhere else. I read a couple of reviews and couldn't resist since it's another post-apocalyptic novel I haven't read yet. I can't seem to restrain myself from those.
Wow, 6 books added to my wish list from one post!
  #42  
Old 04-03-2009, 12:58 PM
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I'm reading The Double Bind which weaves in fictional characters from The Great Gatsby. It seems like a violation but then I remember that The Double Bind is also fiction.

Reminds me of Atonement

SPOILER:
when I felt betrayed that the whole book turned out to be "fiction", when the whole book is already fiction. Layers of fiction bug me. Or like when they reveal in the last page that the whole story you invested time and thought on was an alternate reality and the person died back on page one...how can I really be betrayed when none of it was really True? But I am...
Well, I finished it.

SPOILER:
It's way too much like Atonement--at least parts of the book are supposed to be the mad ramblings of the main character, and not really "true", but I was fooled by one of the devices used. Damn it. Just like every movie has to have a twist at the end, these damn books where nothing you supposed was real was.
  #43  
Old 04-03-2009, 03:51 PM
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And actually, I just finished reading The Apple, which is Faber's companion piece to The Crimson Petal, comprised of short stories focusing on a different character from the novel. The last story in particular clears up some of the questions regarding the novel's ending.
OMG! How did I not know this! "Find out what happens to Sophie" *Adds to Amazon shopping cart* Thanks so much for mentioning this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wonderlust View Post
Wow, 6 books added to my wish list from one post!
Heh. I like to give back to these threads. I found The Terror through a Whatcha Reading thread last year, actually. Enjoy!

Last edited by Greywolf73; 04-03-2009 at 03:53 PM.
  #44  
Old 04-03-2009, 04:17 PM
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Pride and Prejudice and Zombies is now MINE!

I rarely buy books, but I couldn't pass this one up at all.


Elizabeth Bennett and Zombies! Who could ask for anything more?

I'm a couple chapters into it and have been SQUUUUUUEEEEEEING in delight like a total spaz to ANYONE who makes eye contact with me over the wonderfulness of the mixture of Jane Austen and Zombies.

"Excuse me, you've got Jane Austen in my zombie massacre."

" Well, you have zombies in my Jane Austen novel!"

Two! Two! Two genres in One!




I'll shut up now.....ok, maybe I won't.
  #45  
Old 04-03-2009, 05:05 PM
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Quoth me:
Quote:
I'm currently working my way through the complete works of St. Augustine. I should be done some time in the next day or two.
I'm very disappointed that nobody called me on this one... OK, I was a little early for the 1st, but it was the April thread, after all, and I referenced the next day.
  #46  
Old 04-03-2009, 06:51 PM
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And actually, I just finished reading The Apple, which is Faber's companion piece to The Crimson Petal, comprised of short stories focusing on a different character from the novel. The last story in particular clears up some of the questions regarding the novel's ending.
Oh, excellent! I'm so excited, I had not heard about that.

Unfortunately, it turns out that the book I got by mistake from the library because I confused the title with a book that a Doper recommended in last month's reading thread is completely goofy. The Spiritualist ... the spiritualist of the title is supposed to be a French Creole, and so he sprinkles Ouis and Nons in all of his dialogue, making him sound like a Saturday Night Live skit about the French.

I'm also reading Oliver Sacks's Musicophilia : Tales of Music and the Brain which is pretty good. I'm a big fan of his other books ... but being a severely tone deaf person myself, it's weird to read him describing my experience of the world as a defect. It's more entertaining to read about other people's brain defects, it turns out.

YA titles: A Curse Dark As Gold, by Elizabeth Bunce. This was not bad -- a retelling of the Rumpelstiltskin story, somewhat similar in tone to Robin McKinney's stuff.

And another YA: The Compound by S.A. Bodeen, which was DELICIOUS in its melodramatic, overwroughty teen lamentation. I mean that as a compliment, really. A family goes underground in a high-tech luxury fallout shelter, and then the teen protagonist starts discovering deep, dark family secrets. Completely unbelievable but extremely satisfying, like On the Beach meets Flowers In The Attic. Awesome.
  #47  
Old 04-03-2009, 07:34 PM
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Books in progress:

Wishful Drinking, Carrie Fisher - too much forced cleverness, not her best
Tales From Moominvalley, Tove Jansson - quirky kid tales, wonderful
A Matter of Justice, Charles Todd - post WWI mystery, pretty engaging, so far

and the winner is:
Quote:
I don't know why we long so for the dead
Who can do us no good, eventually,
Like you, a flood of stars will drown us all.


-- Bruce Weigl, Archeology of the Circle: New and Selected Poems
Who knew war poetry could be beautiful?
  #48  
Old 04-03-2009, 08:13 PM
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Dracula, by Bram Stoker. It's awesome.

A book about the classic horror movie stars. (Did you ever notice that Michael Jackson looks a LOT like Lon Chaney Sr. did in The Phantom of the Opera?)

And the Twilight series, just to see if it's as bad as everyone says it is. (I haven't gotten to the sparkle scenes yet, though)
__________________
It’s not you, it’s your sports team.

Last edited by Guinastasia; 04-03-2009 at 08:17 PM.
  #49  
Old 04-03-2009, 11:43 PM
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Originally Posted by SpazCat View Post
You need Notes on the League. Heck, I need Notes on the League.
Very cool. Is there anything like that for LXG: Black Dossier (the ending of which left me baffled)?
  #50  
Old 04-04-2009, 04:33 AM
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I've not got much interesting on my April plate, I'm afraid. I don't know why, it's not for a lack of books certainly. I'm reading Tad Williams's Mountain of Black Glass, third in the Otherland quadrilogy (finally SOME answers!), which is going to be done tomorrow, I think, or at the latest Monday on the train. Then I have Robert J. Butow's The John Doe Associates on the desk, hoping to gain an insight into some of the goings-on behind the scenes during the pivotal last twelve months before Pearl Harbor. It's a tougher read than Butow's Tojo and the Coming of the War, so far. I'm also reading Akhil Reed Amar's America's Constitution: A Biography, which is really excellent, but I'm getting to loath his cliff-hanger sentences, like "this was one of the only two times were this or that happened," without telling us what the other time was. Come on man, that's not too hard.
And that's it already...
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