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  #1  
Old 04-20-2009, 07:45 AM
ScatteredFrog ScatteredFrog is offline
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"1060 West Addison???....that's Wrigley Field!"

Okay, I just wanted to get some opinions and thoughts here....

My favorite movie ever is Blues Brothers, and my wife's a big fan of it too...so we do have discussions once in a while about certain things in the movie, and recently it was about how when Elwood told Jake he falsified his driver's license renewal by putting down 1060 W. Addison, and Jake immediately identified that as Wrigley Field.

Before I get on with it, I should mention that my wife is from New Jersey and didn't live in Chicago until 2006...and we both got familiar with the grid system around that time, despite my being from the area.

Now, the question: was Wrigley Field's address well-known BEFORE the movie? I was only a little tyke when it came out, so I can't say for sure. But if you said "1060 W. Addison" to a Chicagoan or someone who's at least visited Chicago a lot, would that person be able to identify the address as Wrigley Field back in the day?

My belief is, yes. First of all, most sports fans know the locations of their favorite teams' homes. Second, anybody who's familiar with Chicago's street grid system should be able to use process of elimination identify it...first of all, 1000 West is Sheffield Avenue, along which runs right field at Wrigley Field. Also, the Red Line (known at the time, of course, as the Howard Line) follows Sheffield Avenue from roughly Armitage to Irving Park Road, and between there is the Addison station. At the Addison Red Line stop, the Addison signage clearly give the street coordinates of 960 west, 3600 north. (They did back in the day, too.) Annnd...Wrigley Field is RIGHT THERE at the stop...so if the stop is at 960 West Addison, you can easily conclude, knowing from frequenting the Howard Line, that if you walk a block west, boom: you're at 1060 West Addison.

My wife, however, isn't so sure that people would have been able to recognize the address as Wrigley, quite simply because who would know an address? And how many people who, say, travel from out of town and just go to Wrigley would know the exact address? Kinda hard to miss a major league ball park in the middle of a residential neighborhood (well...not really residential -- it's surrounded by drinking establishments )....

So....back in, say, 1979, would someone have been able to at least use process of elimination to identify 1060 West Addison as Wrigley Field???
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  #2  
Old 04-20-2009, 09:35 AM
Man With a Cat Man With a Cat is offline
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Probably, someone local would have known the address especially if they're a sports fan.

Just last week during a conversation here at work, someone asked the room if anyone knew the mailing address to the White Sox. Without skipping a beat I was able to say 333 W. 35th Street. I was a little offended when someone else felt the need to look it up.
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Old 04-24-2009, 09:50 AM
Sarahfeena Sarahfeena is offline
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I don't know how many people could have told you the address if you asked, but most people could tell you it's at Clark & Addison, I'll bet. And if you have a decent familiarity with the grid & numbering system, you could then easily conclude that this must be the address for Wrigley Field.
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  #4  
Old 04-30-2009, 04:07 AM
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Also, it has often appeared on many printed tickets. I know old Chicago Stadium as 1900 W. Madison and have to remember to add 1 for the United Center.

And now the Blues Brothers/Wrigley connection is part of political history:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...,2977013.story
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  #5  
Old 05-01-2009, 02:07 AM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is offline
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Of course, the joke is funnier if the address is NOT common knowledge. It's funnier that Jake and Elwood know the same arcane fact from their history, it's funnier that he's able to slip that secret by the clerk at the DMV, and it's funnier to imagine (and see) the cops and Illinois Nazis actually making the wild goose chase to 1060 W. Addison.

Just funnier all around.
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  #6  
Old 05-01-2009, 10:54 AM
Tim R. Mortiss Tim R. Mortiss is offline
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I don't think the point of the joke in the movie was that it was well known. If it was, the cops wouldn't have bothered going there. The point (in my mind) was that Jake and Elwood were Chicago-detail geeks and the cops were not......TRM
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  #7  
Old 06-28-2009, 10:18 PM
Shepy Shepy is offline
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Yes, they would know. Anyone who's spent a couple years in Chicago and understands the grid system, and has an idea of where Wrigley is, would understand the significance of that address. This may apply more to Northsiders/Cubs fans than others.
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  #8  
Old 06-30-2009, 03:08 AM
Omniscient Omniscient is offline
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Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss View Post
I don't think the point of the joke in the movie was that it was well known. If it was, the cops wouldn't have bothered going there. The point (in my mind) was that Jake and Elwood were Chicago-detail geeks and the cops were not......TRM
This.


Remember, in 1979 the Cubs and Wrigley Field were not nearly the cultural phenomenon they are now. Even among local Cubs fans the ballpark was just a nice, old park in their neighborhood. The cult and popularity of the bleacher bums are a result of the era in the 70s where the Cubs sucked and couldn't give away their tickets. The only people who'd sit in the bleachers were to poor, marginally employed and drunk folks who would pony up for a $1.50 ticket. The popular status of Wrigley Field now did not exist in 1979.

Now, anyone who lived in Chicago for an extended period of time could have figured out where the address was, but I don't think given a random address people are apt to scrutinize it unless they are asked to. Conversely, truly die-hard Cubs fans and season ticket-holders would know the address reflexively. In 1979 die-hard Cubs fans and season ticket holders would have been blue collar, lower and middle class beer drinking males who the Blues Brothers were specifically intended to represent.

The Cops (aka the Man) and the effete Illinois Nazis are precisely the types of folks who wouldn't have been expected to be Cubs fans and "real" Chicagoans, the types of Chicagoans who know the address to the crappy baseball team's ballpark off the top of their head.
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Old 07-03-2009, 07:41 AM
SCSimmons SCSimmons is offline
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Well, now I have to go watch the movie again. But IIRC, Elwood got the DMV and the Nazis with that one, but not the cops, who did recognize the address when it came up in the registration search, right?
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  #10  
Old 05-31-2010, 03:30 PM
BornInABlizzard BornInABlizzard is offline
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Originally Posted by ScatteredFrog View Post
Now, the question: was Wrigley Field's address well-known BEFORE the movie? I was only a little tyke when it came out, so I can't say for sure. But if you said "1060 W. Addison" to a Chicagoan or someone who's at least visited Chicago a lot, would that person be able to identify the address as Wrigley Field back in the day?
The question is... are you truly a Cubs fan? If you're truly an American, you'd know what's at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. If you're a Brit, you know who lives at #10 Downing Street. If you're bankrupt, you know what's on Wall Street...
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  #11  
Old 06-01-2010, 11:50 AM
ScatteredFrog ScatteredFrog is offline
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Speaking of Elwood fooling people whom you think shouldn't be fooled by particular addresses...

One day out of boredom, one of my coworkers picked up the phone, dialed 311, adopted a really bad fake British accent, and told the operator that his Astin Martin was towed at the corner of State and Michigan. The operator didn't skip a beat -- she told him they haven't yet received a report of any towed vehicles from that location.

Wow. You work on the 311 line in the city of Chicago but don't recognize that such a corner is physically impossible?!

Anyway....as an addendum...in the book Blues Brothers Private, which tells a bit more of a story, there's some kind of rap sheet or something (I don't own the book, so I can't say for sure -- I checked it out from the library some time ago) that lists all of Elwood's "prior" addresses. Some of the addresses included not only 1060 W. Addison, but also 324 W. 35th, 1900 W. Madison, and 111 N. State -- all of which should be pretty recognizable to anyone who's spent a lot of time in the city. (Another fake address was in Harvey, probably about half a mile away from Dixie Square Mall.)

Last edited by ScatteredFrog; 06-01-2010 at 11:50 AM..
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  #12  
Old 06-01-2010, 12:56 PM
Wheelz Wheelz is offline
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Originally Posted by SCSimmons View Post
Well, now I have to go watch the movie again. But IIRC, Elwood got the DMV and the Nazis with that one, but not the cops, who did recognize the address when it came up in the registration search, right?
Unknown.

Burton Mercer: You know, I kind of liked the Wrigley Field bit.
Trooper Mount: (sarcastically) Yeah. REAL cute.

From this exchange we can't tell whether the cops recognized the address as Wrigley or actually went there. And, unlike the Nazis, they never showed us which.
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Old 06-01-2010, 01:06 PM
WhyNot WhyNot is offline
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Heh.

I've lived in Chicago for 10 years. I live, actually, 3 miles from Wrigley Field. I wouldn't have gotten it. I have to agree that it's funnier if it's obscure.

Then again, every time we pass Wrigley Field (which isn't often - unless you're looking for a loud bar or a game, there's nothing around there worth going to), I have a "Oh...THAT'S where Wrigley is!" moment. So I may not be representative of Chicagoans as a whole.

And I loathe baseball. The greatest impact the Cubs have on me is traffic congestion on game days.
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Old 07-15-2010, 07:27 AM
Stan Shmenge Stan Shmenge is offline
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I took the remark as dramatic license. Growing up in Chicago, I would never have recognized the address. From Street View, it does not seem to appear on the building.
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  #15  
Old 07-15-2010, 07:56 AM
Ed Zotti Ed Zotti is offline
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Then again, every time we pass Wrigley Field (which isn't often - unless you're looking for a loud bar or a game, there's nothing around there worth going to)
Come now. Although Wrigley is the anchor and the area is known for its loud sports bars, there are many non-sports-oriented restaurants and entertainment venues in the vicinity. Somebody was complaining in a different thread that because of a forthcoming hotel development overlooking Wrigley the ImprovOlympics will have to move. The distinguishing feature of Wrigleyville is how much there is to do in the neighborhood besides go to a ball game, in contrast to virtually every other baseball stadium in the U.S., including the Cell.
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Old 07-16-2010, 09:44 AM
Skywatcher Skywatcher is offline
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Originally Posted by Wheelz View Post
Burton Mercer: You know, I kind of liked the Wrigley Field bit.
Trooper Mount: (sarcastically) Yeah. REAL cute.
It's clear in the script:
Quote:
SCENE 107
Location: EXT. BOND HOTEL - DAY - TWO POLICE CARS

one marked, one plain, pull up and park in front of the hotel. Out of the unmarked police car steps BURT
MERCER: This, gentlemen, is the elegant abode of one Elwood Blues.
OFFICER #2: Thanks for your help, Mr. Mercer. How did you find him so fast?
OFFICER #1: Actually I put in some overtime last night. When Mr. Blues' license address checked out to be Wrigley Field, I cross-fed the data we had into the Illinois State Crime Computer.
MERCER: And our friend, Mr. Computer, printed out the parole records of one Jake Blues, my little jailbird and the brother of your pinch Elwood. See, Jake gave this address as the place to notify in case of his death. I kind of like the Wrigley Field bit.
OFFICER #1: Yeah, real cute.
As filmed, Mercer had already been at the hotel looking for Elwood; when Elwood asks the desk clerk if there were any calls, it's Mercer's card that gets handed to him.

Last edited by Skywatcher; 07-16-2010 at 09:48 AM..
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  #17  
Old 07-16-2010, 12:45 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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The distinguishing feature of Wrigleyville is how much there is to do in the neighborhood besides go to a ball game, in contrast to virtually every other baseball stadium in the U.S., including the Cell.
Surely, Cleveland isn't the only city with a ballfield in the heart of Downtown, is it?
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Old 07-16-2010, 03:14 PM
Ed Zotti Ed Zotti is offline
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No, Busch Stadium in St. Louis is downtown as well. I haven't been to the new version, but the old one was basically surrounded by parking decks. Likewise, while the downtown sports complex is Cleveland is handsome (we were there for a Cavs game, but Jacobs Field is nearby and struck me as a nice place to see a ball game), there isn't that much to do in the immediate neighborhood. I still think Cleveland is a town with potential, though.
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Old 07-16-2010, 03:43 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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I guess it just depends on what you mean by "the immediate neighborhood". I would personally count all of Tower City as the same immediate neighborhood (there's an enclosed walkway connecting Tower City and the sports complex, and most of the parking for the games is in the Tower City lots), which gives you a shopping mall (admittedly a struggling one), a department store, Cleveland's Hard Rock Cafe, a couple of hotels, some monumental architecture, and the city's main public transportation hub.
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Old 07-16-2010, 03:54 PM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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Lived in Chicago since 1960 and attended a ton of Cubs games through the 70s when I switched allegiances to the S side. Considered myself a big Cubs fan until they broke my heart in 69. Grew up at Belmont-Central and went to HS at Lane Tech. We'd be riding the Addison bus to school, decide to go to a game, and just stay on the bus.

Prior to the movie I never heard anyone use any address for Wrigley other than Clark and Addison. The grid system breaks down as Clark is an angle street.
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Old 07-16-2010, 03:55 PM
Tim R. Mortiss Tim R. Mortiss is offline
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Isn't the Oriole's ballpark right near Baltimore's Inner Harbor area?
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Old 07-16-2010, 04:35 PM
Ed Zotti Ed Zotti is offline
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I guess it just depends on what you mean by "the immediate neighborhood". I would personally count all of Tower City as the same immediate neighborhood (there's an enclosed walkway connecting Tower City and the sports complex, and most of the parking for the games is in the Tower City lots), which gives you a shopping mall (admittedly a struggling one), a department store, Cleveland's Hard Rock Cafe, a couple of hotels, some monumental architecture, and the city's main public transportation hub.
Like I say, it's got potential. You'd be hard put to say the scene around Jacobs Field comes close to the 81-days-a-year Mardi Gras around Wrigley, but you never know. Maybe someday.
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Old 07-16-2010, 04:43 PM
Ed Zotti Ed Zotti is offline
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Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss View Post
Isn't the Oriole's ballpark right near Baltimore's Inner Harbor area?
It's pretty close. I haven't been to Baltimore since the mid-1990s - I think Camden Yards had just been finished then. My host drove me around the park but we didn't see a game there. The stadium has been widely praised. Baltimore was struggling at the time; don't know what things are like now. Another town with promise, although DC tends to suck up all the oxygen.
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Old 07-17-2010, 12:58 PM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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It's pretty close.
It is maybe 1/2 mile straight shot down to the water. One time I was there for travel, and they put me up in a hotel room right across and overlooking the park - Before the trip I hadn't realized it was opening day.
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  #25  
Old 07-20-2010, 06:39 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Prior to the movie I never heard anyone use any address for Wrigley other than Clark and Addison. The grid system breaks down as Clark is an angle street.
Sure. But if you know Sheffield is 1000 West (and plenty of Chicagoans do), it should be pretty easy to quickly figure out what 1060 West Addison is. I don't know whether I'd be able to tell you exactly that it was 1060 W. Addison without the movie to drill that in me, but I would know it's some even number between 1000 and 1100 West Addison.
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Old 07-20-2010, 09:03 PM
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Surely, Cleveland isn't the only city with a ballfield in the heart of Downtown, is it?
The Diamondbacks' Chase Field is about as close to downtown as you can get without knocking some tall buildings down that were there first.
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Old 07-21-2010, 08:10 AM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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Sure. But if you know Sheffield is 1000 West ...
IME, the streets most Chicagoans know by number are the 400/800s. And tho Sheffield bounds the park, I'm not sure that I have ever heard of the park identified as being at Sheffield and Addison.

I'm by no means the most familiar with Chicago, and I certainly could have told you where Sheffield is, but I would not have quickly been able to pull up the number 1000.
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:02 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Dinsdale View Post
IME, the streets most Chicagoans know by number are the 400/800s. And tho Sheffield bounds the park, I'm not sure that I have ever heard of the park identified as being at Sheffield and Addison.
Sure, it's Clark and Addison, but I'd think most Cubs fans will be able to tell you that Waveland and Sheffield are the two streets where out-of-park homers land.

Quote:
I'm by no means the most familiar with Chicago, and I certainly could have told you where Sheffield is, but I would not have quickly been able to pull up the number 1000.
OK, even if you don't know it's 1000 West, you know the address is pretty much dead center between Racine (1200W) and Halsted (800W). If you follow the map in your head, you should be able to reasonably guess that 1060 W. Addison refers to Wrigley Field.

What I'm saying is that assuming it wasn't common knowledge that 1060 W. Addison refered to Wrigley Field before the game, somebody with a very good familiarity with the city (such as the cops in the movie and Jake Elwood) should be easily able to deduce what is at that location. No, not everyone would get it right away (and most people in the movie don't.)

So my answer to: "So....back in, say, 1979, would someone have been able to at least use process of elimination to identify 1060 West Addison as Wrigley Field???"

is clearly yes. A majority of people? No. Anyone who knows the city reasonably-to-very well? Yes, by process of elimination they should be able to guess 1060 W. Addison is Wrigley.

Last edited by pulykamell; 07-21-2010 at 11:06 AM..
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  #29  
Old 07-21-2010, 11:14 AM
Tim R. Mortiss Tim R. Mortiss is offline
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Well, even using all the logic in this thread, if someone did not know a priori the address of Wrigley, they might have heard "1060 West Addison" and reasonably thought, "hey, he must live right near Wrigley Field."
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:23 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Probably, someone local would have known the address especially if they're a sports fan.

Just last week during a conversation here at work, someone asked the room if anyone knew the mailing address to the White Sox. Without skipping a beat I was able to say 333 W. 35th Street. I was a little offended when someone else felt the need to look it up.
See, there's an example of one I don't know by address. I know Comiskey Park, *cough* I mean, the Cell, as 35th and Shields. I don't know Shields' number on the grid, but I do know that Wentworth is 200W (from going to Chinatown regularly) for most of its run. I know Wentworth straddles the Dan Ryan, and both pass right by White Sox Park. What else can be on 35th Street, a black and a half west of the highway, on the south side of the street, other than where the Sox play ball?

It'd be easier to approach it from 400W, which should be an easy half-mile marker to remember, but 400W is a weird one on the grid. It doesn't really exist as a main road in that part of town because of all the railway (although I think of Canal as 400-ishW for navigation purposes). It's Sedgwick on the North Side (and then Lakeview and then Sheridan for a bit, before it just becomes the Lake), and it's Stewart on the South Side, once you get past Garfield. 400W is a pain in the ass to remember.
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:31 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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One more thing I just remembered: the Addison El stop tells you 3600N, 940W as you get off. Now, whether this coordinate were displayed in 1979 or not, and whether people pay attention to it, it's one more point to consider how someone may deduce what lies at 1060 W. Addison.
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:31 AM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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Sure, it's Clark and Addison, but I'd think most Cubs fans will be able to tell you that Waveland and Sheffield are the two streets where out-of-park homers land.
And off the top of your head, Waveland is what hundred? IME, Sheffield is clearly a "secondary" street, of greatest significance to people on the N side, and/or associated with DePaul or a few other attractions on that street. It doesn't even begin until North, and doesn't even continue beyond Devon. It certainly would not mean much to a Sox fan from the S or W side.

Quote:
Anyone who knows the city reasonably-to-very well? Yes, by process of elimination they should be able to guess 1060 W. Addison is Wrigley.
IME, the majority of people are not clear on the conventions regarding which side of the street odds and evens are. So yeah, if you asked me what is the most famous building/place between Western and the lake, I'd likely have no difficulty coming up with Wrigley. But despite having been born and raised in the city, when I first saw the movie I was surprised at the address, and even more surprised afterwards when folk acted as tho it ought to have been commonly understood.

If I told someone I'd meet them in front of 1060 Addison, I wouldn't expect them to say, "That's Wrigley" so much as I'd expect them to figure "Okay, I'll take Halsted to Addison and head west. Okay, looks like the even numbers are on the north. Okay, 800, 900, 10... what they heck, that address must be Wrigley!" Heck, I dunno if the park has an obvious address posted, so they might need to drive past and see that they are into the 1100s before really realizing Wrigley's address.

OT - I can recall being a VERY young boy, riding in the back seat of the family car past Wrigley as something happened and hearing the sound of the crowd cheering. It astounded me that that was something you would hear in real life, as opposed to just on the radio. Funny how something like that can stick with you.
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:34 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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And off the top of your head, Waveland is what hundred?
I would guess 3700.
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:36 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Dinsdale View Post
It certainly would not mean much to a Sox fan from the S or W side.
The question is not would everyone be able to deduce what's at that address. The question is would someone be able to deduce by process of elimination.

I'm a life-long South Sider but, you know, we do have to venture to the North Side occasionally. And this is where the grid is particularly important for us, since we're used to numbered East-West streets. When I venture to the North Side to an unfamiliar address, I ask "where is it on the grid?" And there's plenty of stuff on Sheffield to go to that eventually it sticks that 1000W is Sheffield.

Last edited by pulykamell; 07-21-2010 at 11:38 AM..
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:51 AM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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I guess I focused on the initial question(s) phrased:

Quote:
Now, the question: was Wrigley Field's address well-known BEFORE the movie? I was only a little tyke when it came out, so I can't say for sure. But if you said "1060 W. Addison" to a Chicagoan or someone who's at least visited Chicago a lot, would that person be able to identify the address as Wrigley Field back in the day?
Even as rephrased:

Quote:
would someone have been able to at least use process of elimination to identify 1060 West Addison as Wrigley Field???
I'd have to say my deduction would depend largely on the context. If someone gave it as their home address, my response would have been like Tim's "hey, he must live right near Wrigley Field" as I don't generally expect people to live in ballparks. If someone told me they had tickets for an event at 1060 Addison, I'd probably assume it was either a ballgame or a show at the Cubby Bear.

So our experiences, opinions, and responses differ. That's cool.
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Old 07-21-2010, 12:11 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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IME, the majority of people are not clear on the conventions regarding which side of the street odds and evens are.
The way I remember: Indiana is odd. It's easy enough to remember one of the directions (I mean, if you know your address you should at least know at least one pair of odd-even sides.) So I always knew east and west sides of the street, but north-south would always take several moments to remember. Eventually, I just combined my feelings about Indiana--that it's an odd state that happens to be southeast of Chicago--with the fact that Chicago odd-numbered streets are on the south or east sides of the street. Problem solved.
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Old 07-21-2010, 12:29 PM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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The way I remember: Indiana is odd.
A good observation applicable to more than street addresses. BTW, you do know why it is so windy in Illinois, don't you?
SPOILER:
Because Iowa blows and Indiana sucks!


My personal reminder is that my childhood home (3116) was on the W side of my street, and I lived on the NW side. But I've spoken with people who appeared oblivious to there being any rule, and others who insisted that the N side was the mirror image of the S, and E mirrored W. So N of Madison evens were on the N side, but S of Madison evens were on the S...
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Old 07-21-2010, 12:32 PM
Ed Zotti Ed Zotti is offline
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A few points, some of which were made earlier:

1. The people who made Blues Brothers knew Chicago fairly well.

2. The assumption in the script, rightly or wrongly, is that if you said you lived at 1060 W. Addison, the immediate response from a Chicagoan would NOT have been: no you don't, that's Wrigley Field. If everybody knew the address, the joke evaporates. The point is to make you slap your head after the fact and say, duh, that's Wrigley Field, I should have known.

3. FWIW, as a lifelong Chicagoan, that was my reaction when I saw the movie. Maybe I should have figured it out but I didn't. I bet I had a lot of company.
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Old 07-21-2010, 01:15 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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That sounds like a fair summary to me.
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Old 07-21-2010, 01:25 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dinsdale View Post
My personal reminder is that my childhood home (3116) was on the W side of my street, and I lived on the NW side.

But I've spoken with people who appeared oblivious to there being any rule, and others who insisted that the N side was the mirror image of the S, and E mirrored W. So N of Madison evens were on the N side, but S of Madison evens were on the S...
While we're on the subject of the Chicago address system, another one people forget is that the 800-addresses-to-a-mile (or eight-blocks-to-a-mile) rule breaks down from Madison to 31st. It's one mile from Madison (0N/S) to Roosevelt (1200S), then another mile from Roosevelt to Cermak (2200S.), then another mile from Cermak to 31st. So it's 12 blocks, 10 blocks, 9 blocks, before resuming the normal 8 block grid.
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Old 07-21-2010, 01:34 PM
don't ask don't ask is offline
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Oddly enough the original address of Wrigley Field was 1052 West Addison Street. Wrigley Field by Stuart Shea doesn't explain how the street number changed.
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Old 07-21-2010, 01:49 PM
Tim R. Mortiss Tim R. Mortiss is offline
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Originally Posted by don't ask View Post
Oddly enough the original address of Wrigley Field was 1052 West Addison Street. Wrigley Field by Stuart Shea doesn't explain how the street number changed.

I always wondered how they arrived at the specific address (the xx in 10xx), since it takes up the whole damn block. The xx would appear to be completely random, unless there is some sort of scheme for this type of situation.
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Old 07-21-2010, 04:01 PM
Skywatcher Skywatcher is offline
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1060 roughly corresponds to this door.
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Old 03-27-2011, 11:09 AM
mike281 mike281 is offline
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Originally Posted by SCSimmons View Post
Well, now I have to go watch the movie again. But IIRC, Elwood got the DMV and the Nazis with that one, but not the cops, who did recognize the address when it came up in the registration search, right?
Cops, or maybe, cop... it was John Candy that saw through it:

Ellwood: Hey Lloyd, anybody call for me on the phone?
Lloyd: No, no calls. Some guy left this card. Cop. Said he'd be back.
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Old 03-27-2011, 09:24 PM
SCSimmons SCSimmons is offline
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Wow. I think this is the first time I've seen one of my own posts rise from the grave.

I'm ashamed to say, I still haven't seen The Blues Brothers again in the nearly two years since I made that post.
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  #46  
Old 03-28-2011, 01:20 AM
BigT BigT is offline
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Could this be the first true zombie from the Chicago forum, or at least the first double zombie?
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Old 03-28-2011, 09:16 AM
starshipe starshipe is offline
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http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=514753

I got a answer for Jake!!!!
I was thinking I love the Blues Brothers to ,and the reason why Jake might have said thats Wrigley Feild isnt it? He might have used the address himself earleir in his life~ I thought about putting that for my address next time I renew my license just to see if the people here in Oklahoma at the hp would notice it LOL!!!!!!!!!!! 1060 W Madison, Chicao,Il. 60613
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  #48  
Old 03-28-2011, 03:37 PM
SCSimmons SCSimmons is offline
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Originally Posted by starshipe View Post
1060 W Madison, Chicao,Il. 60613
Addison, starshipe, not Madison. Madison is downtown, between Washington and Monroe. I think 1060 W would be just outside the Loop.
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  #49  
Old 03-28-2011, 03:55 PM
bump bump is offline
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I don't think sports fans necessarily know the addresses of the arenas.

I can tell you exactly where the Astrodome is and the Summit was in Houston (the venues when I grew up there), but I couldn't tell you the street number on Kirby or Richmond of either of them. Or for that matter, if the Summit was actually on 59 or Edloe for that matter.
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