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  #1  
Old 05-03-2009, 04:57 PM
taffygirl taffygirl is offline
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Why are some British nurses called "Sister"?

OK, I've done some research, and I know that there is a sort of hierarchy of nurses in Britain, and that not every nurse is called "Sister," though it sure seems like it if you read enough British novels. What I can't figure out is why the title "Sister" is used at all in referring to ANY British nurses. Since someone in the occupation is a nurse, it makes more sense to me to call that person "Nurse" than it does "Sister."

There must be a logical explanation for this, Watson. I'd love to know what it is.
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  #2  
Old 05-03-2009, 05:00 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Perhaps from Church-affiliated hospitals?

Incidentally, 'nurse' in German is Krankenschwester -- 'sick sister'.



ETA: Nursing in the United Kingdom:
Quote:
Remnants of the religious nature of nurses remains in Britain today, especially with the retention of the term "Sister" for a senior female nurse.

Last edited by Johnny L.A.; 05-03-2009 at 05:02 PM..
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Old 05-03-2009, 05:02 PM
Captain Amazing Captain Amazing is offline
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Nursing used to be the province of religious orders, especially orders of nuns. Hence the term Sister.
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Old 05-04-2009, 03:40 AM
Noel Prosequi Noel Prosequi is offline
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With the advent of male nurses and non-sexist language, Sister is moribund if not dead. "Matron" (now called Director of Nursing or similar) has also gone the way of the Dodo. These terms are only used by older people now. But I remember it from when I was a kid.

"Sister" (I'm told by Mrs Prosequi, who is one) meant that a nurse was a registered nurse, that is, one who could administer drugs, etc. There were other levels of assistant nurses who could not, and who did the crappy jobs like empty bedpans, bathe patients, etc. They used to have different uniforms, too. "Sister" was once a term of considerable authority. Particularly in rural areas, a long-serving Sister sometimes had more medical authority among the punters than some blow-in young smart-aleck doctor.
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Old 05-04-2009, 03:56 AM
GuanoLad GuanoLad is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noel Prosequi View Post
There were other levels of assistant nurses who could not, and who did the crappy jobs like empty bedpans, bathe patients, etc. They used to have different uniforms, too.
Enrolled Nurse, and Nurse Aide, if my Mum's Nursing history is anything to go by.
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Old 05-04-2009, 04:45 AM
Alessan Alessan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
Incidentally, 'nurse' in German is Krankenschwester -- 'sick sister'.
And nurse in Hebrew is either Achot or Ach - "sister" or "brother".
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Old 05-04-2009, 04:59 AM
aldiboronti aldiboronti is online now
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Yes, as said above, nursing was once the the province exclusively of nuns. In fact the first nurses' uniforms were derived from the nun's habit. You could still vaguely see the echos of the original in British nurses' umiforms of the 50s, that weird white cap being all that's left of the wimple, for instance.
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Old 05-04-2009, 07:36 AM
China Guy China Guy is offline
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Australian nurses, including the men, were called "sister" at least through the nineties. Don't know about now. (I dated a nurse "sister" for quite a while.)
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Old 05-04-2009, 09:53 AM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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In Paul Scott's Raj Quartet, set in British India, the white nurses are called "sister" and the mixed-race and Indian nurses are called "nurse."
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Old 05-04-2009, 10:02 AM
Paul in Qatar Paul in Qatar is offline
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We use Sister and Brother in Arabic too.
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  #11  
Old 05-04-2009, 10:22 AM
Tapioca Dextrin Tapioca Dextrin is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noel Prosequi View Post
"Matron" (now called Director of Nursing or similar) has also gone the way of the Dodo. These terms are only used by older people now. But I remember it from when I was a kid

Matrons were reintroduced in 2001. There are over 5000 of them today
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