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  #1  
Old 07-31-2009, 11:33 AM
enomaj enomaj is offline
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Artists who hate their biggest hit

In their Behind the Music episode one of the Bangles copped to hating Eternal Flame.

I think Billy Joel mentioned on an Oprah episode that sometimes Just the Way You Are can get on his nerves.

And Stephanie Mills once said that she got sick of Home because she sand it so much on Broadway during The Wiz's run.

Which other artists can't stand their biggest hit?

Last edited by enomaj; 07-31-2009 at 11:34 AM..
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  #2  
Old 07-31-2009, 11:41 AM
Jenaroph Jenaroph is offline
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Bobby McFerrin - Don't Worry Be Happy
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  #3  
Old 07-31-2009, 11:41 AM
Ellen Cherry Ellen Cherry is offline
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When I saw Bruce Springsteen in the mid-80s he was very un-thrilled to perform "Born to Run" as an encore. He said, scoffingly, that this was something he wrote when he was very, very young. He then proceeded to perform a very slow, acoustic version, which not only robbed the song of its power, it pissed the audience off.
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Old 07-31-2009, 11:52 AM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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According to Fantasia, Tchaikovsky didn't care for the Nutcracker Suite.
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  #5  
Old 07-31-2009, 11:53 AM
enomaj enomaj is offline
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Originally Posted by Ellen Cherry View Post
When I saw Bruce Springsteen in the mid-80s he was very un-thrilled to perform "Born to Run" as an encore. He said, scoffingly, that this was something he wrote when he was very, very young. He then proceeded to perform a very slow, acoustic version, which not only robbed the song of its power, it pissed the audience off.
The word encore reminded me that Rachmaninoff got sick of performing Op. 3 No. 2 Prelude in C# Minor
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  #6  
Old 07-31-2009, 11:59 AM
Argent Towers Argent Towers is offline
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Alec Guinness couldn't stand his role as Obi-Wan Kenobi (and I can't blame him, given that he was a renowned stage actor of the highest caliber who is now best-remembered as that one role.)
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  #7  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:02 PM
Skara_Brae Skara_Brae is offline
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Maurice Ravel didn't like Bolero, which he wrte as an experment, and was reportly mortified that it became his best known work. I believe he once said, "It is my best known piece, and unfortunately it contains no music..."
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  #8  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:02 PM
Claire Beauchamp Claire Beauchamp is offline
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Originally Posted by enomaj View Post
In their Behind the Music episode one of the Bangles copped to hating Eternal Flame.
I agree with them. 1000%

Quote:
Originally Posted by Argent Towers View Post
Alec Guinness couldn't stand his role as Obi-Wan Kenobi (and I can't blame him, given that he was a renowned stage actor of the highest caliber who is now best-remembered as that one role.)
correction: ... who is now best-remembered by cultural illiterates as that one role.

AND, Alec didn't hate Obi-Wan because of his legacy, he hated the role and the movie all on their own merits. Harrison Ford was also known to have said to George Lucas about some dialog: "George, you can write this stuff, but ya sure can't say it."

Last edited by Claire Beauchamp; 07-31-2009 at 12:03 PM..
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  #9  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:05 PM
Chimera Chimera is offline
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John Mellencamp did not want to include Jack and Diane on the original album, didn't like the song.
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  #10  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:17 PM
Chez Guevara Chez Guevara is offline
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Neil Young wasn't too fond of Heart of Gold:

"This song put me in the middle of the road. Traveling there soon became a bore so I headed for the ditch."
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  #11  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:23 PM
SaharaTea SaharaTea is offline
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Movie soundtrack hits can sometimes be a mixed blessing.

Simple Minds eventually resented the huge success of "Don't You (Forget About Me)" as they didn't even write the song - and it was offered to both Billy Idol and Bryan Ferry before they agreed to record it. They were never able to match its success with subsequent singles.

"Take My Breath Away" by Berlin drove a wedge between band members when it went to #1. I believe lead singer Terri Nunn persuaded the band to record it, while John Crawford rightfully felt it didn't represent the band's New Wave/techno-pop style.
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  #12  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:23 PM
astorian astorian is offline
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Bob seger has had a long and successful career, but he only had ONE #1 hit on the Billboard charts. And, when he releaeed his first greatest hits album, he didn't include it because, in his words, "I didn't write it, and I didn't really like it. I only did it for the money."

That was "Shakedown," the theme from "Beverly Hills Cop 2." Glenn Frey was suppsoed to sing it, just as he'd sung the theme song to the first movie, but he backed out at the last minute due to health problems. Seger was a mere substitute for his fellow Detroiter, Frey.
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  #13  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:37 PM
Gail Gail is offline
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Jani Lane, of Warrant hates the song, "Cherry Pie". It eclipsed all their other songs.
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  #14  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:40 PM
MOIDALIZE MOIDALIZE is offline
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Jani Lane, of Warrant hates the song, "Cherry Pie". It eclipsed all their other songs.
Warrant was a total one hit wonder. Of course it eclipsed all their other songs, their other songs were crap. He should be thankful for the attention they did get.

ETA: 'Heaven' did reach #2 on the Billboard charts, but big freaking deal.

Last edited by MOIDALIZE; 07-31-2009 at 12:42 PM..
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  #15  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:43 PM
Don Draper Don Draper is offline
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John Sebastian apparently has an intense loathing for the "Welcome Back Kotter" theme song. In the 1960s, Sebastian was considered one of the pre-eminent talents of rock & roll, was one of the most influential artists of the age. Then midway through the 70s, WHAM!, he is known mainly as "the guy who sang the theme song for that drivelous John Travolta series."

Tina Turner said she couldn't stand "What's Love Got to Do With It?" and resisted even recording the song. However she changed her mind when it became a number one hit, launched her solo career into the stratosphere and once and for all shed the label of "Ike Turner's wife."
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  #16  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:50 PM
Tamerlane Tamerlane is offline
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Small Faces/Faces keyboardist Ian McLagan was on NPR recently and obviously slightly embarrassed the host by copping to the fact that couldn't stand the song Itchycoo Park that the host had keyed up as part of the discussion of the band.

Last edited by Tamerlane; 07-31-2009 at 12:50 PM..
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  #17  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:10 PM
JSexton JSexton is offline
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Radiohead dislikes playing Creep live. In fact, the guitarist even hated it while recording. The distinctive crunching chord before the chorus was added to ruin the song. Fail?
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  #18  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:20 PM
Cisco Cisco is offline
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Originally Posted by Claire Beauchamp View Post
correction: ... who is now best-remembered by cultural illiterates as that one role.
Oh here we go. If you didn't travel to England to attend a legitimate theatre production featuring Alec Guiness before 1977, you are CULTURALLY ILLITERATE!

Additionally, if you did, but also happen to be a fan of one of the most popular series of movies of all time, and think of them when you think of Sir Alec, you are CULTURALLY ILLITERATE!

I could, at this point, Claire, give you a list of culturally important things that you are completely oblivious to, but there is a limit on the length a post here can be.
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  #19  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:22 PM
Don't Call Me Shirley Don't Call Me Shirley is offline
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Night Ranger reportedly hates Sister Christian.
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  #20  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:23 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is offline
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Originally Posted by enomaj View Post

I think Billy Joel mentioned on an Oprah episode that sometimes Just the Way You Are can get on his nerves.
Could it be because he wrote it for his first wife? (Now ex?)
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  #21  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:27 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by JSexton View Post
Radiohead dislikes playing Creep live. In fact, the guitarist even hated it while recording. The distinctive crunching chord before the chorus was added to ruin the song. Fail?
That's not my understanding: I believe Jonny didn't come in with his big guitar chords until the chorus, but during rehearsals, when it didn't matter, he would use a quick, hard strum to check during the lead-in to the chorus to make sure his guitar was ready for the big climax. The other guys liked it and it stayed in.
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  #22  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:56 PM
mobo85 mobo85 is offline
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Arthur Conan Doyle infamously hated Sherlock Holmes so much that he attempted to kill him off, which didn't go over well with his many fans.
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  #23  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:00 PM
Face Intentionally Left Blank Face Intentionally Left Blank is offline
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Originally Posted by Don't Call Me Shirley View Post
Night Ranger reportedly hates Sister Christian.
With good reason.
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  #24  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:01 PM
Claire Beauchamp Claire Beauchamp is offline
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Originally Posted by Cisco View Post
Oh here we go. If you didn't travel to England to attend a legitimate theatre production featuring Alec Guiness before 1977, you are CULTURALLY ILLITERATE!

(blah blah blah snip)
*sigh*

What I was pointing out is the alarming trend, witnessed multiple times per day on this board, of people being almost willfully ignorant of anything that happened before they were approximately 6 years old, whether it's history or high culture or pop culture. I love Star Wars. I was a young teen when it came out. I knew at the time that Alec Guiness was a famous actor. As a kid and teen and young adult, I was fully aware of music, tv, and movies that were made long before I was born, and that wasn't anything that unusual among my family or the other people I knew, and we were just working-class suburbanites.

So yes, I feel justified in calling someone who only knows Alec Guiness as Obi-Wan culturally illiterate.
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  #25  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:03 PM
Claire Beauchamp Claire Beauchamp is offline
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Night Ranger reportedly hates Sister Christian.
As well they should.
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  #26  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:19 PM
NDP NDP is offline
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Originally Posted by Claire Beauchamp View Post
*sigh*

What I was pointing out is the alarming trend, witnessed multiple times per day on this board, of people being almost willfully ignorant of anything that happened before they were approximately 6 years old, whether it's history or high culture or pop culture. I love Star Wars. I was a young teen when it came out. I knew at the time that Alec Guiness was a famous actor. As a kid and teen and young adult, I was fully aware of music, tv, and movies that were made long before I was born, and that wasn't anything that unusual among my family or the other people I knew, and we were just working-class suburbanites.

So yes, I feel justified in calling someone who only knows Alec Guiness as Obi-Wan culturally illiterate.
Even if this adds more fuel to the fire, I agree. It wasn't like Guiness was almost entirely a stage actor who only got into movies with the Star Wars films. Prior to them, he'd been making movies for over 30 years and had won a Best Actor Oscar for his performance in Bridge on the River Kwai (not exactly an obscure flick).

Anyway, I think stories about Guiness' dislike of the Star Wars movies have gotten a bit exaggerated over time. He did the first movie as a lark for which he'd be well-paid and get to work with a promising young director, George Lucas (who was just coming off his success with American Graffiti). Nobody (including Lucas) thought the movie would become a gigantic blockbuster that would lead to five other films and spark a quasi-religion. I think what Guiness disliked was spending the last 25 years of his life dealing with obsessed Star Wars uber-geek fanboys who thought he was some sort of mystic and knew nothing about the rest of his career.
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  #27  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:23 PM
RikWriter RikWriter is online now
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Flock of Seagulls still performs once in a while, and the lead singer hates having to sing "I Ran So Far Away" over and over. Tough shit, I say...you should have written another hit to beat it out.
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  #28  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:30 PM
rowrrbazzle rowrrbazzle is offline
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The word encore reminded me that Rachmaninoff got sick of performing Op. 3 No. 2 Prelude in C# Minor
Which made something Harpo Marx did much more effective than he anticipated. http://books.google.com/books?id=XCR...arx%22&f=false
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  #29  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:31 PM
Le Ministre de l'au-delà Le Ministre de l'au-delà is offline
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Please see 'Kind Hearts and Coronets' and 'The Horse's Mouth' - Alec Guinness had every right to be annoyed when people only thought of him as 'Obi-Wan Kenobi'.

'Culturally illiterate' is a loaded term, but those are films you simply should have heard of, if not seen. Several times.
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  #30  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:32 PM
enomaj enomaj is offline
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Flock of Seagulls still performs once in a while, and the lead singer hates having to sing "I Ran So Far Away" over and over. Tough shit, I say...you should have written another hit to beat it out.
I'll bet their fans make them wear those 80s hairdos also.
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  #31  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:42 PM
MovieMogul MovieMogul is offline
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Warren Zevon had a funny appearance on The Larry Sanders Show where he complained that the only song anyone ever wanted to hear him perform was "Werewolves of London". I know it's a fictional show, but I suspect there was more than a kernel of truth to it...
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  #32  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:46 PM
MrSquishy MrSquishy is offline
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Originally Posted by SaharaTea View Post
Movie soundtrack hits can sometimes be a mixed blessing.

Simple Minds eventually resented the huge success of "Don't You (Forget About Me)" as they didn't even write the song - and it was offered to both Billy Idol and Bryan Ferry before they agreed to record it. They were never able to match its success with subsequent singles.

"Take My Breath Away" by Berlin drove a wedge between band members when it went to #1. I believe lead singer Terri Nunn persuaded the band to record it, while John Crawford rightfully felt it didn't represent the band's New Wave/techno-pop style.
Along the same lines, I went to an Iron & Wine show and he got slightly irritated that people kept requesting "Such Great Heights" (which is from the Garden State soundtrack).

I don't really blame him; he's probably had to play it a million times and he didn't even write it.

Now that "Flightless Bird, American Mouth" is in the Twilight soundtrack, I bet he gets sick of hearing teenage girls scream that out at shows too. Although at least he did write that one himself.

Last edited by MrSquishy; 07-31-2009 at 02:48 PM..
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  #33  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:55 PM
Contrapuntal Contrapuntal is offline
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Originally Posted by Claire Beauchamp View Post
So yes, I feel justified in calling someone who only knows Alec Guiness as Obi-Wan culturally illiterate.
I feel justified in calling that characterization elitist and snobbish at best. Furthermore, I feel justified in saying that it is possible to know fuck-all about any roles Guiness might have played in the movies and still be quite culturally literate. Some folks just don't like movies. That does not preclude them from being very much in tune with their culture.
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  #34  
Old 07-31-2009, 03:01 PM
FallenAngel FallenAngel is offline
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Warren Zevon had a funny appearance on The Larry Sanders Show where he complained that the only song anyone ever wanted to hear him perform was "Werewolves of London". I know it's a fictional show, but I suspect there was more than a kernel of truth to it...
I saw (then met and drank with) Zevon at a bar in Scottsdale in 94 or 95. About halfway through the set some putz yelled, "Werewolves!"

Zevon said (quoted as closely as I can recall it): Ya know the great thing about being around long enough to turn into an oldies act? I can take grim satisfaction from the fact that 10, 15 years from some asshole in some bar is going to yell, "Hey, Alanis! Do that song about the blowjob!"

Gods, I miss that man.
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  #35  
Old 07-31-2009, 03:04 PM
FallenAngel FallenAngel is offline
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I think Billy Joel mentioned on an Oprah episode that sometimes Just the Way You Are can get on his nerves.
Joel is also famous for his hatred of Piano Man. He did a show here in Phoenix a few years ago and the local bubble-headed bleach blonde entertainment reporter asked him something like, "It must be a thrill for you to have audiences singing along with you on Piano Man after all these years."

Joel said (again, as closely as I recall), "Not really. I don't care for the song. The melody is simplistic and repetitive and it's not really musically interesting at all. I'd love to never have to sing it again, but my fans have given me the gift of this incredible longevity in a career not known for it, and I owe it to them to give them the show they want to see, rather than the one I want to play."

I thought he showed some real self-awareness and class there.
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  #36  
Old 07-31-2009, 03:22 PM
Cisco Cisco is offline
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Originally Posted by Claire Beauchamp View Post
*sigh*

What I was pointing out is the alarming trend, witnessed multiple times per day on this board, of people being almost willfully ignorant of anything that happened before they were approximately 6 years old, whether it's history or high culture or pop culture. I love Star Wars. I was a young teen when it came out. I knew at the time that Alec Guiness was a famous actor. As a kid and teen and young adult, I was fully aware of music, tv, and movies that were made long before I was born, and that wasn't anything that unusual among my family or the other people I knew, and we were just working-class suburbanites.

So yes, I feel justified in calling someone who only knows Alec Guiness as Obi-Wan culturally illiterate.
Your standards of cultural literacy are ridiculous and contradictory.

My favorite movie came out 40 years before I was born.
My favorite book came out 20 years before I was born.
The drummer of my favorite band growing up died a year before I was born, and they never played or recorded together again.

By all this, one would think I'd be culturally literate in Claire Beauchamp's erudite eyes.

But wait.

I was negative 4 when Star Wars came out, and knew fuck all about Alec Guiness until I was at least 12 and watched the "special edition" VHS tapes which talked a little bit about him being a renowned British actor. I still think of him primarily as Obi Wan Kenobi.

Guess I'm riffraff after all.

(And by the way, do you not find it funny, in all your tomsnobbery, that your definition of culture seems to be merely "modern pop culture"?)
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  #37  
Old 07-31-2009, 03:23 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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A lot of bands and artists who are "album artists" and not single artists, were often required by their labels to put out a commerical single.

The Motels "Only The Lonely" was a good example. They were told if they wanted to keep their contract they better record a hit single, even though the band wasn't a singles type act.

Andy Kim of "Rock Me Gently" fame said while he didn't dislike the single it set him on the wrong path. People kept expecting him to make more songs like that and that song was a fluke.

I like what Pat Benetar had to say in an interview in Rolling Stone magazine. She said that she often gets tired to playing her old music but then she remembers that her fans haven't heard the songs as much as she has. And to each fan, each of her songs probably holds a special meaning, to them alone. And then she's quite happy to perform her songs again.

I like that attitude
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  #38  
Old 07-31-2009, 03:24 PM
Justin_Bailey Justin_Bailey is offline
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Originally Posted by Claire Beauchamp View Post
What I was pointing out is the alarming trend, witnessed multiple times per day on this board, of people being almost willfully ignorant of anything that happened before they were approximately 6 years old, whether it's history or high culture or pop culture. I love Star Wars. I was a young teen when it came out. I knew at the time that Alec Guiness was a famous actor. As a kid and teen and young adult, I was fully aware of music, tv, and movies that were made long before I was born, and that wasn't anything that unusual among my family or the other people I knew, and we were just working-class suburbanites.
We've been over this over and over and over again. Calling someone out over not knowing more about your favorite actor/singer/author/goat felcher does not make you literate and the other person illiterate. Instead, it makes you seem like a bully.

Thousands of movies have been released since 1977 and thousands more were released before it. If someone only knows of an actor because they starred in the most popular movie of all-time has very little to do with what they might know.
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  #39  
Old 07-31-2009, 03:50 PM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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Joe Walsh just before playing "Rocky Mountain Way" -

"Well, if I knew I'd have to play this song the rest of my life I probably would have wrote something else. But it's too late. You're stuck with this one."

And I could swear this is a deja vu thread.
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  #40  
Old 07-31-2009, 04:07 PM
lissener lissener is offline
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Originally Posted by Claire Beauchamp View Post
*sigh*

What I was pointing out is the alarming trend, witnessed multiple times per day on this board, of people being almost willfully ignorant of anything that happened before they were approximately 6 years old, whether it's history or high culture or pop culture. I love Star Wars. I was a young teen when it came out. I knew at the time that Alec Guiness was a famous actor. As a kid and teen and young adult, I was fully aware of music, tv, and movies that were made long before I was born, and that wasn't anything that unusual among my family or the other people I knew, and we were just working-class suburbanites.

So yes, I feel justified in calling someone who only knows Alec Guiness as Obi-Wan culturally illiterate.
OK?

Lucas cast Guinness almost as a cameo; certainly to add tone to the proceedings. Guinness had had one of the mos distinguished careers in movies--nevermind stage--of anyone, ever, well before Lucas came along. If he had died in 1976, he'd still have one of the greatest resumes in film history.

So yeah, anyone who thinks of Star Wars as the peak--as little more than a blip gone horribly awry--of Guinness's career is blindlingly culturally illiterate.

Wanna put Star Wars in perspective? Check out the Ealing comedies Guinness did, or The Bridge on the River Kwai, or Great Expectations. Just one of those, let alone all of them and more, will demonstrate to you how much Guinness was slumming--yes, I said slumming--to do the Lucas stuff.
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  #41  
Old 07-31-2009, 04:19 PM
Contrapuntal Contrapuntal is offline
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So yeah, anyone who thinks of Star Wars as the peak--as little more than a blip gone horribly awry--of Guinness's career is blindlingly culturally illiterate.
Good Lord. In the first place, she referred to someone who only knew Guinness from Star Wars, not someone who thought it was the peak of his career. It's possible to only know him from Star wars and have no other thoughts about his career whatsoever.

More importantly, however, it's possible to care little for movies at all without being blindingly culturally illiterate. It's a bit of tunnel vision to suggest otherwise. You may as well say that anyone who doesn't know who Cecil Taylor is is culturally illiterate. Or Ornette Coleman.

There is more to culture than movies. Much more. And saying that not knowing about one actor proves blinding cultural illiteracy is a statement of staggering snobbishness, elitism, and self centeredness.
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  #42  
Old 07-31-2009, 04:24 PM
Thudlow Boink Thudlow Boink is offline
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For those who want to continue the Alec Guiness/cultural illiteracy discussion, there's a Pit thread.
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  #43  
Old 07-31-2009, 05:04 PM
KSO KSO is offline
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Bono considers "Where The Streets Have No Name" to be inane.

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  #44  
Old 07-31-2009, 05:10 PM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is online now
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John Mellencamp did not want to include Jack and Diane on the original album, didn't like the song.
I'm not disputing you, but he apparently made peace enough with the song to include it on his recent greatest hits release.
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  #45  
Old 07-31-2009, 05:12 PM
Spiff Spiff is offline
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Van Morrison doesn't like to sing "Brown-Eyed Girl."

Jonathan Richman won't play "Roadrunner" any more, but that might be because he doesn't like the way it sounds without a full band (he tours with just a drummer).
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  #46  
Old 07-31-2009, 05:14 PM
Projammer Projammer is offline
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I recall from a tv rockumentary that Styx came to loath Mr Roboto.
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  #47  
Old 07-31-2009, 05:18 PM
PapSett PapSett is offline
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A lot of bands and artists who are "album artists" and not single artists, were often required by their labels to put out a commerical single.

The Motels "Only The Lonely" was a good example. They were told if they wanted to keep their contract they better record a hit single, even though the band wasn't a singles type act.

Andy Kim of "Rock Me Gently" fame said while he didn't dislike the single it set him on the wrong path. People kept expecting him to make more songs like that and that song was a fluke.

I like what Pat Benetar had to say in an interview in Rolling Stone magazine. She said that she often gets tired to playing her old music but then she remembers that her fans haven't heard the songs as much as she has. And to each fan, each of her songs probably holds a special meaning, to them alone. And then she's quite happy to perform her songs again.

I like that attitude
Slight hijack: JUST as I was reading this post... and I mean EXACTLY as I was reading it... 'Only the Lonely' came on the radio. The hair stood up on my arms. To have the words sang as I was reading them... very creepy.
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  #48  
Old 07-31-2009, 05:35 PM
ftg ftg is offline
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Originally Posted by Claire Beauchamp View Post
Harrison Ford was also known to have said to George Lucas about some dialog: "George, you can write this stuff, but ya sure can't say it."
That's the "G" rated version.
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  #49  
Old 07-31-2009, 05:41 PM
Ponch8 Ponch8 is offline
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Vanilla Ice grew to rue ever recording "Ice Ice Baby." He destroyed MTV's master copy of the video on some show one time. However, he did make a nu-metal-style version of "Ice Ice Baby" called "Too Cold" in the late 1990s.
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Old 07-31-2009, 05:54 PM
astorian astorian is offline
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Originally Posted by Projammer View Post
I recall from a tv rockumentary that Styx came to loath Mr Roboto.
I think EVERYBODY in the band except Dennis DeYoung hated the entire "Kilroy Was Here" album and tour.

Dennis has always been a theater buff, and he conceived the album as a theater piece. The rest of the band wasn't keen on the idea, and they REALLY hated the stage show that DeYoung conceived to go with it. The stage show that accompanied "Kilroy" was wordy, and had long stretches with no music. Audiences can get VERY bored and antsy during shows like that. And when they performed the show in front of crowds that came to rock out... well, not surprisingly, they heard a lot of boos, and had to dodge a lot of thrown debris.

Tommy Shaw and J.Y. were furious at DeYoung for alienating the fans (and putting the rest of the bad in danger) to put on a mini-Broadway show, when the band and the audience just wanted a normal rock show.

Last edited by astorian; 07-31-2009 at 05:55 PM..
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