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Old 05-01-2010, 07:00 AM
Khadaji is offline
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Whatcha Readin' May 2010 Edition


Sorry for being late! Have a great Cinco Del Mayo all!

I am reading the first in the Temperance Brennan novels by Kathy Reich.

Last Month's thread.
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Old 05-01-2010, 09:22 AM
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Let's see...Post Captain; Fighting Techniques of the Napoleonic Age and I'm starting on Joe Abercrombe's The Blade Itself and the collected issues of Johnny the Homicidal Maniac.
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Old 05-01-2010, 09:41 AM
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I've restarted two books I was reading a couple of months ago but didn't finish: Coyote by Allen Steele and God's Problem: How the Bible Fails to Answer Our Most Important Question - Why We Suffer by Bart Ehrman.
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Old 05-01-2010, 10:38 AM
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I'm reading The Desert Spear by Peter V. Brett. Epic fantasy, second in a series of five. I'm about a third of the way in and have no complaints.
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Old 05-01-2010, 11:50 AM
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THE HELP
By Kathryn Stockett

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/19/books/19masl.html

"In “The Help,” Kathryn Stockett’s button-pushing, soon to be wildly popular novel about black domestic servants working in white Southern households in the early 1960s, one woman works especially tirelessly."

Excellent read.
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Old 05-01-2010, 12:21 PM
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THE HELP
By Kathryn Stockett

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/19/books/19masl.html

"In “The Help,” Kathryn Stockett’s button-pushing, soon to be wildly popular novel about black domestic servants working in white Southern households in the early 1960s, one woman works especially tirelessly."

Excellent read.
I have a copy of The Help, but have not yet read it. I've heard a lot of other good reviews, so I suppose I should start it.

I just finished The Cavalier in the Yellow Doublet, by Arturo Perez-Reverte, the latest in his series about a swashbuckling soldier-for-hire in 17th Century Spain. I enjoyed the first four books, but this one seemed aimless to me. The plot never really got off the ground, so there were a bunch of scenes that seemed pointless because they never really connected to the others in way that made me care what was happening. I came close to not finishing it all, which is extremely rare for me.

My current read is The Fourth Part of the World by Toby Lester. It's supposed to be a history of the map that first put the name "America" to the New World, the 1507 Waldseemüller map. But I'm halfway through and, so far, it's been about the history of European mapmaking in general. Still interesting, but I can't help feeling that it's padding to make up for the fact that Lester didn't have enough material to write a complete book about the Waldseemüller map. We'll see if I still feel that way after finishing the book.
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Old 05-01-2010, 12:34 PM
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I just finished The Cavalier in the Yellow Doublet, by Arturo Perez-Reverte, the latest in his series about a swashbuckling soldier-for-hire in 17th Century Spain. I enjoyed the first four books, but this one seemed aimless to me. The plot never really got off the ground, so there were a bunch of scenes that seemed pointless because they never really connected to the others in way that made me care what was happening. I came close to not finishing it all, which is extremely rare for me.
Heh--I just finished the first one in this series. Liked it pretty well, but wasn't blown away by it. I'm now reading The Dream of Perpetual Motion. Not sure what I think of it so far. It's far more stylish and poetic than I thought it'd be, and it has real potential, but I worry it'll veer off into either cliched steampunk or else creative-writing-student navel-gazing. Hopefully it'll avoid these pitfalls and be excellent.

Last edited by Left Hand of Dorkness; 05-01-2010 at 12:34 PM.
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Old 05-01-2010, 03:59 PM
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I'm listening to Lou Grant read me Carl Hiaasen's new kid book, Scat. The book is great, probably Hiaasen's best YA book yet, but Ed Asner takes some getting used to. He sounds about a thousand years old and like he'd rather be doing anything else other than reading a kid book out loud. I keep expecting him to throw the printed book at me and yell, "here lady, read it with your eyes, like your supposed to."

Glad Carl Hiassen brought back his charming eco-wingnut Twilly. Next to Skink he's my favorite endearing Hiaasen whack job.
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Old 05-01-2010, 04:28 PM
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I am reading Dreadnought by Robert Massie. So far, an excelent book that is a great companion to "The Guns of August" and "The Proud Tower", both by Barbara Tuchman.
I am also reading "The Day that Nietzche cry", it is a good book. Unfortunately I only read it while commuting and lately I have been captivated by a couple of podcasts: Filmspotting, The Norman Conquest and This American Life.
I just bought a book by Terry Pratchett because this author has been highly recommend in the Dope. The title is "Guards, Guards" and is part of the Discworld series. Any opinions about it?
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Old 05-01-2010, 05:19 PM
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"Mistress of the Vatican" by Eleanor Herman

Meticulously researched and presented in a highly readable "story" format, it is the story of Olimpia Maidalchini who was the true leader of the Vatican during the reign of Pope Innocent X. Fascinating.
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Old 05-01-2010, 06:27 PM
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Game Change, the book about the '08 election. Fascinating and extremely readable -- unfortunately, I have a couple of things other than read on the to-do list for tonight and tomorrow.
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Old 05-01-2010, 08:04 PM
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Finished John le Carre's A Most Wanted Man. Not really very good. I like le Carre's Cold War material best. He seems to have lost his sense of purpose since that ended. I have a love/hate relationship with the author, as I enjoy the spycraft but always find his moralizing a bit high-handed. Sometimes that's justified, sometimes not. Can never seem to sympathize with the shlub conflicted protagonist we're supposed to identify with. Instead, I invariably sympathize with the efficient, seasoned spymaster who is always helping antagonize the protagonist.

Have started Private Dancer, by local author Stephen Leather. It's been billed as the ultimate bar novel and carries a strong reputation. When it first came out five years ago, you couldn't buy it, but rather the author made it available for download over the Internet for free. I never got around to doing that and so finally bought a copy in a bookstore. They say this book should be given to every single male planning a first trip to Thailand, and so far I have to agree. A young Brit falls for a bargirl in 1996 Bangkok. I'm only 52 pages into it, and already I recognize the type. First-person from the viewpoint of all of the characters, and we know from the first paragraph that Pete the Brit ends up killing Joy the bargirl, as he's in the process of fleeing the scene. The rest of the book is flashbacks, even from Joy's view. After spending decades in the Bangkok bars myself, I can vouch for the authenticity of the tone and story and can see now why this book has proved so phenomenally popular.

EDIT: I see from the link provided above that it's still available from the author for free by download. So far, I can recommend it.

Last edited by Siam Sam; 05-01-2010 at 08:07 PM.
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Old 05-01-2010, 08:46 PM
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Have started Private Dancer, by local author Stephen Leather. It's been billed as the ultimate bar novel and carries a strong reputation. When it first came out five years ago, you couldn't buy it, but rather the author made it available for download over the Internet for free. I never got around to doing that and so finally bought a copy in a bookstore. They say this book should be given to every single male planning a first trip to Thailand, and so far I have to agree. A young Brit falls for a bargirl in 1996 Bangkok. I'm only 52 pages into it, and already I recognize the type. First-person from the viewpoint of all of the characters, and we know from the first paragraph that Pete the Brit ends up killing Joy the bargirl, as he's in the process of fleeing the scene. The rest of the book is flashbacks, even from Joy's view. After spending decades in the Bangkok bars myself, I can vouch for the authenticity of the tone and story and can see now why this book has proved so phenomenally popular.

EDIT: I see from the link provided above that it's still available from the author for free by download. So far, I can recommend it.
Ah, I see the free download is of an "early version," not the finished product available in stores. Will still be worth a look, though.
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Old 05-01-2010, 08:50 PM
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I just stumbled on The Cult of Personality: How Personality Tests Are Leading Us to Miseducate Our Children, Mismanage Our Companies, and Misunderstand Ourselves by Annie Murphy Paul at the local library. It looks interesting.
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Old 05-02-2010, 07:16 AM
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Finished Deja Dead by Kathy Reichs, the first Temperance Brennon Novel. Fans of the Bones TV series may be disappointed to learn that there is very little resemblance between the TV show and the books. The book Brennon has more in common with Kay Scarpetta than the TV Brennon. They are both female Anthropologists that work with law enforcement, and both are named Temperance Brennon - that is pretty much where the similarities end.

Unlike TV Brennon, book Brennon, while competent, is not portrayed with savant-like abilities, nor does she struggle with normal social interaction. She is middle-aged and divorced with a daughter in college. She works in Montreal and the book is heavily interspersed with French phrases. I may be too juvenile, but every time I she referred to a CUM officer it took me out of the book - I always thought: Doesn't she know what that means in the States? (I forget what CUM stands for, but is basically an acronym for the police force she works with.)

The writing was competent and the mystery functional. I found the book to be about 200 pages too long and will likely skip the rest of the series. Fans of Kay Scarpetta may wish to check it out.
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Old 05-02-2010, 09:12 PM
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My wife's book club read The Help and really liked it a lot, as did a very well-read friend of mine.

I just finished Philip Matyszak's Legionary, a history of the Roman army in the form of an illustrated instruction manual, taking a soldier through the 25 years (!) of his career from recruitment, to training, deployment and battle, then his wounding, death, triumph or retirement. Very interesting, and just light-hearted enough in tone to mask the essential bloodthirstiness of the topic.
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Old 05-02-2010, 10:41 PM
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Rereading The Sane Society by Erich Fromm in conjunction with the trilogy by historian/writer, Richard J Evans on Germany's social and military evolution beginning with The Coming of the Third Reich. The second and third volumes are The Third Reich in Power, The Third Reich at War.

To overly simplify Dr. Fromm's 350 some pages, given a society of ten where three are normal and seven are abnormal- universally speaking of innate human characteristics- the three become the abnormal and the seven are now the norm. The manipulated personality becomes alienated man. There are contemporary parallels. The second volume deals with Germany's occupations, at least in the early pages. Now, after major combat declared ended on May 1st, begins the eighth year of occupation of another country by a more powerful one. . . . Rather reminds me of a Chinese maxim, "Ask a question and seemingly appear foolish for five minutes; ask not and remain a fool forever." Learning answers to questions asked as a child in this parallel reading.

On the trilogy: "This is history in the grand style, the kind of large-scale narrative that few historians dare to write these days. It is difficult to imagine how it could be improved upon, let alone surpassed." The Washington Post

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Old 05-02-2010, 10:56 PM
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"Mistress of the Vatican" by Eleanor Herman

Meticulously researched and presented in a highly readable "story" format, it is the story of Olimpia Maidalchini who was the true leader of the Vatican during the reign of Pope Innocent X. Fascinating.
I read her other two books Sex with Kings and Sex with the Queen. Both were excellent so I imagine this one is probably quite good as well.
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Old 05-03-2010, 07:28 AM
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I'm reading The God of the Hive, the new Holmes/Russell mystery by Laurie R. King. Just finished Hay Fever by Angela Miller, about her experiences running a Vermont goat cheese farm.

I listened to The Help audiobook. Excellent performances.
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Old 05-03-2010, 07:39 AM
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I'm listening to Lou Grant read me Carl Hiaasen's new kid book, Scat. The book is great, probably Hiaasen's best YA book yet, but Ed Asner takes some getting used to. He sounds about a thousand years old and like he'd rather be doing anything else other than reading a kid book out loud. I keep expecting him to throw the printed book at me and yell, "here lady, read it with your eyes, like your supposed to."


My current read is Darkness: two decades of modern horror, edited by Ellen Datlow. A mixed bag, as these anthologies always are.

I just finished a YA audiobook called After, by Amy Efaw, about a fifteen year old who gives birth in secret and puts the baby in the garbage. It suffered from being told in the present tense and having a thoroughly unlikeable main character, but it held my interest enough to keep me from having to listen to the radio.

My new audiobook is Road Rage, which contains two novellas, Duel by Richard Matheson, and Throttle by Stephen King and Joe Hill. I’ve never read Duel, but I’ve seen the movie about ten times. They haven’t remade that one yet, have they?
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Old 05-03-2010, 07:53 AM
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About 100 pages in to Kraken, the new h/c from China Mieville. Very good so far...
Failed to enjoy Transition by Iain Banks.
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Old 05-03-2010, 07:59 AM
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Christopher Moore's Fluke: or I now why the winged whale sings. I'd read his Fool a couple of weeks ago (and his Bite Me just came out), but this is one of only two of his older books I hadn't read.

I wasn't prepared for its full-bore weirdness. It started out as weird as any other Moore book (which is pretty damned weird), but a third of the way in it takes a left turn and drops off the continental shelf of Relatively Normal into a Marianas Trench of Deep Weird.
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Old 05-03-2010, 08:47 AM
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I wasn't prepared for its full-bore weirdness. It started out as weird as any other Moore book (which is pretty damned weird), but a third of the way in it takes a left turn and drops off the continental shelf of Relatively Normal into a Marianas Trench of Deep Weird.
I tend to enjoy the first half of a Moore book more than the second half. He starts out with the right level of whimsy and weirdness for my taste, and then goes overboard.


I read Georgette Heyer's An Infamous Army, which is a strange hybrid of a Regency romance and a very detailed account of the Battle of Waterloo. I liked it, but I think many of her romance fans will be turned off by the density of the historical data she presents. It was strange to see Heyer's aristocratic characters confronted by more serious matters than gambling debts and marriage prospects.

I gave up on Michael Flynn's The January Dancer at the halfway point. I really like Flynn's other books, and his writing is great, but this one did nothing for me.

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Old 05-03-2010, 08:52 AM
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The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon.
Quite an enjoyable read - tho the font is entirely too small. This is the 3d or 4th I've read by him, and I look forward to reading a couple more.

Last book I finished was The Master Butcher's Singing Club by Louise Erdich. I've read at least 50-60 books a year for the past quarter century - at least 1/2-2/3 fiction, and am pretty certain this fits onto my top 10 of all time. HIGHLY recommended.
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Old 05-03-2010, 10:08 AM
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I finished up The World Made Straight by Ron Rash this weekend -- decent novel about small-time drug dealers in Appalachia, excellent writing and terrific sense of place.

I just picked up Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, which I know everyone in the free world has already read. I wasn't sure if it would be too gimmicky for my taste, but so far the juxtaposition is working for me.

Still working through My Name is Red by Orhan Pamuk. I am liking it, but it is dense and complex, and unfortunately too large to be a good commuting book which is when I do most of my reading, so it is taking me forever. Murder and court intrigue in sixteenth-century Istanbul.
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Old 05-03-2010, 10:09 AM
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I read Georgette Heyer's An Infamous Army, which is a strange hybrid of a Regency romance and a very detailed account of the Battle of Waterloo.
I have never read Heyer, and I want to ... but I am completely overwhelmed by her output and don't know where to start. Do you have any suggestions?
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Old 05-03-2010, 10:26 AM
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The Temptation of Saint Anthony by Flaubert. I got it after trying to find novels that mix formats, like including poetry and play structures (Moby-Dick is one, Toomer's Cane is another I liked). It doesn't seem like this necessarily qualifies, but it seems interesting (plus I like reading books by classic authors that don't really get too much attention nowadays).
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Old 05-03-2010, 10:31 AM
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I have never read Heyer, and I want to ... but I am completely overwhelmed by her output and don't know where to start. Do you have any suggestions?
I've read a couple dozen of her romances now, and I can tell you my favorites. I started with The Grand Sophy, which is a good one with a young, impetuous heroine. But my favorites so far are The Unknown Ajax, Frederica, and Venetia, all of which feature slightly older, steadier heroines.

My least favorites have been These Old Shades, Devil's Cub, and The Corinthian, but they're all readable.

Here's the thread that got me started reading Heyer, where other posters list their favorites.
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Old 05-03-2010, 12:28 PM
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The Deportation Officer Handbook


by Claiborne Tchoupitoulas - an extremely well-written fun read that's both scary and hilarious, and it takes place in new orleans. only half way through so far and i cant wait till we get his bad guy where he belongs!

Last edited by 848ida; 05-03-2010 at 12:30 PM. Reason: forgot author
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Old 05-03-2010, 02:46 PM
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I finished up The World Made Straight by Ron Rash this weekend -- decent novel about small-time drug dealers in Appalachia, excellent writing and terrific sense of place.
This is going on my wish list. I really liked Serena.

Quote:
I tend to enjoy the first half of a Moore book more than the second half. He starts out with the right level of whimsy and weirdness for my taste, and then goes overboard.
Eleanor of Aquitaine, I stopped reading Moore with Island of the Sequined Love Nun for that very reason. I didn't notice it so much with Practical Demonkeeping, Coyote Blue, Bloodsucking Fiends, which retained some believability, but Love Nun was just plain silly.

Last edited by AuntiePam; 05-03-2010 at 02:46 PM.
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Old 05-03-2010, 02:59 PM
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Although Of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace by David Lipsky. Knowing that Wallace would eventually commit suicide makes reading this an extremely bittersweet experience. Still, it's fascinating to be a fly on the wall as the two discuss all manner of things during their travels. What I wouldn't give to have a roadtrip companion like DFW.

Last edited by blondebear; 05-03-2010 at 03:01 PM.
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Old 05-03-2010, 09:46 PM
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Just read David Macaulay's Mosque, which I believe is his latest picture book. The story follows the construction of a (fictional) grand mosque in Istanbul in the late 1500s - fascinating, from-the-ground-up details and, as always, interesting and very detailed drawings by the author.

Last edited by Elendil's Heir; 05-03-2010 at 09:46 PM.
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Old 05-04-2010, 09:01 PM
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848Ida, I am right there with you



Glad you've discovered The Deportation Officer Handbook, my pick for best and funniest New Orleans book of the modern era! Unlike Ida, I have gotten to the part about the villain Volik Darza getting something -- and all I'll say is I couldn't possibly spoil it.
Rayford Purvis is my favorite New Orleans character since Ignatius J Reilly.
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Old 05-04-2010, 09:41 PM
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Hitler's War, by Harry Turtledove. Harry has a couple of daughters in college and is pricking up the pace to pay the bills. It shows.

Every pilot who lands hears his teeth click together on landing. Every dive bomber pilot sees red as he pulls out of a dive. Every officer 'stops' a round in his chest.
  #35  
Old 05-04-2010, 09:51 PM
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I've just finished Hella Nation: Looking for Happy Meals in Kandahar, Rocking the Side Pipe, Wingnut's War against The Gap and Other Adventures with the Totally Lost Tribes of America by Evan Wright.

Don't know whether to laugh or cry.
  #36  
Old 05-05-2010, 05:12 AM
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I just started Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes. I can't remember the last time I read reviews as glowing, and unanimously so, as it's garnered. More than once it's been called a great novel (and I'm not talking about the usual Amazon reviewer superlatives, though that's also the case). Typical was the New York Times' panegyric, "one of the most profound and devastating novels ever to come out of Vietnam — or any war . . . a raw, brilliant account of war that may well serve as a final exorcism for one of the most painful passages in American history". In fact, it was because of such high praise that I went out of character and picked it up - I mean I'm one of those people who never reads fiction. And I mean that almost literally; it is truly rare for me to do so.

To this point (page 125), I am impressed. By definition, I'm no fiction maven, but this is good stuff. Here's a guy that in a (short) paragraph can make you feel like you've known a character all your life. And, wow, what characters! So, money well spent.
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Old 05-05-2010, 05:18 AM
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Party Animals: A Hollywood Tale of Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n' Roll Starring the Fabulous Allan Carr. And, yes, it is pretty fabulous.
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Old 05-07-2010, 08:49 AM
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I just finished my audiobook, Duel by Richard Matheson and Throttle by Stephen King and Joe Hill. Duel was shorter than I expected, but okay. I was surprised that in the story, the truck driver’s face is seen and he is referred to by a name. IMO, the movie was much better.
Throttle was pretty good.

My library finally got the new Jim Butcher book in for me, so I picked up something light to pass the time until I can get there: Little Billy's Letters: an incorrigible inner child's correspondence with the famous, infamous, and just plain bewildered, by Bill Geerhart. This thirty-something year old guy posing as a third grader wrote letters asking questions like “should I drop out of school” or “what religion should I choose” and sent them to a bunch of politicians, serial killers, etc. Father Guido Sarducci did a couple of similar books, but this is somewhat less silly and more interesting. Did you know that for a mere hundred dollars, you can get an embossed card identifying you as a member of the church of Satan? I imagine Satanists crack up every time someone sends them a check for that. I also caught myself feeling a little sorry for Susan Atkins, (Manson family member), because she fell for the Little Billy story hook line and sinker. She sent him two letters which she had obviously put a lot of thought into.
Anyway, fun.
  #39  
Old 05-07-2010, 08:54 AM
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Glad you've discovered The Deportation Officer Handbook, my pick for best and funniest New Orleans book of the modern era! Unlike Ida, I have gotten to the part about the villain Volik Darza getting something -- and all I'll say is I couldn't possibly spoil it.
Rayford Purvis is my favorite New Orleans character since Ignatius J Reilly.
Just put this on my to-read list. Anything compared favorably to I.J. Reilly, I've got to read.

I have On Hallowed Ground: The Story of Arlington National Cemetery by Robert M. Poole. My husband read it first and said the most interesting part is the Civil War stuff in the beginning. I'm past that, but I'm still interested, so I'm still reading.
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Old 05-07-2010, 10:49 AM
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Hitler's War, by Harry Turtledove. Harry has a couple of daughters in college and is pricking up the pace to pay the bills. It shows.

Every pilot who lands hears his teeth click together on landing. Every dive bomber pilot sees red as he pulls out of a dive. Every officer 'stops' a round in his chest.
He's got macros for that, you know.

Sigmagirl, I read that Arlington book a year or so ago. It was pretty good (gorgeous illustrations!) but I noticed several errors; wrote a letter to the author and never heard back.
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Old 05-07-2010, 10:59 AM
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Funny. It says he's a contributing editor at Smithsonian; you'd think he'd want to know. What, specifically? I wish there were more illustrations. He talks about all these elaborate memorials, but then you can't look at them. I went to the Arlington web site yesterday and was irritated that you had to look at each picture individually; there is no "next" function. So you'd look at one picture, then return to the list, then go to the next picture, then return to the list. What a waste of time.
  #42  
Old 05-07-2010, 11:06 AM
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I recently started Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.
  #43  
Old 05-07-2010, 11:40 AM
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Game Change, the book about the '08 election. Fascinating and extremely readable -- unfortunately, I have a couple of things other than read on the to-do list for tonight and tomorrow.
I have the same book. Bought it a month or so ago, found the first 20 pages very quick and interesting reading but then I got busy. I plan to get through it in May though.
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Old 05-07-2010, 12:00 PM
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I have the same book. Bought it a month or so ago, found the first 20 pages very quick and interesting reading but then I got busy. I plan to get through it in May though.
Finished it last evening -- solid throughout. (And, since I'm an unabashed liberal, literally laugh-out-loud funny in a few places once we get to the McCain campaign).

Recommended to anyone with any interest at all in the dynamics of the '08 election.
  #45  
Old 05-07-2010, 01:05 PM
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Funny. It says he's a contributing editor at Smithsonian; you'd think he'd want to know. What, specifically?....
There were several things. I'll check my correspondence file and PM you.

I've wanted to read Game Change and you guys are giving me even more reason to do so! How does it compare to the New Yorker or Newsweek post-Election Day campaign-in-review coverage, if you read that?
  #46  
Old 05-07-2010, 02:41 PM
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I picked up Dave Barry's I'll Mature When I'm Dead last night. If I hadn't been so tired, I would've finished it.

I saw it last weekend behind the counter at a bookstore, but they refused to put it out or sell it until its official release date this week.
  #47  
Old 05-09-2010, 02:42 AM
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Have started Private Dancer, by local author Stephen Leather. It's been billed as the ultimate bar novel and carries a strong reputation. When it first came out five years ago, you couldn't buy it, but rather the author made it available for download over the Internet for free. I never got around to doing that and so finally bought a copy in a bookstore. They say this book should be given to every single male planning a first trip to Thailand, and so far I have to agree. A young Brit falls for a bargirl in 1996 Bangkok. I'm only 52 pages into it, and already I recognize the type. First-person from the viewpoint of all of the characters, and we know from the first paragraph that Pete the Brit ends up killing Joy the bargirl, as he's in the process of fleeing the scene. The rest of the book is flashbacks, even from Joy's view. After spending decades in the Bangkok bars myself, I can vouch for the authenticity of the tone and story and can see now why this book has proved so phenomenally popular.

EDIT: I see from the link provided above that it's still available from the author for free by download. So far, I can recommend it.
Finished Stephen Leather's Private Dancer. An excellent read. I can see why it's so popular here, and I agree with those who say this should be required reading for all first-time single male visitors to Thailand. Could save some guys a world of trouble. Zombie Bar in the book is obviously Voodoo Bar in real life. Can't quite get a handle on which bar Spicey is supposed to be. The author has already stated Fatso's Bar is the fictional version of the real-life Brit hangout Jool's. All other bar and hotel names in the book are real. And the character of Big Ron is based on the real-life Big Dave, owner of Jool's.

Now I'm going to start on John Dos Passos' USA trilogy, the first of which is The 42nd Parallel.
  #48  
Old 05-09-2010, 08:00 AM
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I've wanted to read Game Change and you guys are giving me even more reason to do so! How does it compare to the New Yorker or Newsweek post-Election Day campaign-in-review coverage, if you read that?
Didn't read either, so can't comment.
  #49  
Old 05-10-2010, 07:16 AM
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I picked up Dave Barry's I'll Mature When I'm Dead last night. If I hadn't been so tired, I would've finished it.

I saw it last weekend behind the counter at a bookstore, but they refused to put it out or sell it until its official release date this week.
I read it in one fell swoop Friday night. As usual, I literally laughed aloud at times. Dave’s still got it! I thought one of the funniest parts was the Twilight parody, although I haven’t read the original.

I spent the rest of the weekend reading Changes, by Jim Butcher. (Yes, I got a big wodge of time-to-read for Mother’s Day!) I liked it, as I have all the others, though of course I’m a little worried as to where things go from here.
  #50  
Old 05-10-2010, 07:18 AM
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Finally getting around to The Story of Edgar Sawtelle.
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