The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > General Questions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-22-2010, 08:50 PM
cm215 cm215 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Hammond J100 organ sound?

From what I've gathered from various sources online, the Hammond J100 series organs are described as "not having that Hammond sound" ... So what exactly do they sound like? I know it's difficult to describe, but how it is it different in relation to the "Hammond Sound?" I know this is a loooooong shot, but if any straightdoper has a J100 -- can you record / post a sound clip?
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 07-22-2010, 10:15 PM
cornflakes cornflakes is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Bubbaville
Posts: 4,505
The original Hammond organs used tonewheeels to create the notes, with tube preamp and power amps. The J100 is a transistor organ without tonewheels (I assume that it uses oscillator circuits to create the notes.) Unfortunately, I couldn't find a sound clip either.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-22-2010, 11:48 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 29,844
The Hammond B3 was the only instrument most bands used for a long time. Made famous by Jimmy McGriff in the 50s/60s.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-23-2010, 12:08 AM
astro astro is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
The Hammond B3 was the only instrument most bands used for a long time. Made famous by Jimmy McGriff in the 50s/60s.
Farfisa organ was also quite popular.

96 tears used Farfisa
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-23-2010, 12:18 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 31,599
Quote:
Originally Posted by astro View Post
Farfisa organ was also quite popular.

96 tears used Farfisa
And to round it out, the Vox Continental was the third most popular 60s rock organ sound.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-23-2010, 12:32 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 31,599
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
The Hammond B3 was the only instrument most bands used for a long time. Made famous by Jimmy McGriff in the 50s/60s.
The B3 was the most famous of the bunch, but there's a whole series of tonewheel organs--the C3 and A-100 probably being the most popular--that were used in rock/blues/gospel/jazz music at the time. The B3 and the C3 are exactly the same organ internally, just look different from the outside. The other ones also have the distinctive tonewheel Hammond sound.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-23-2010, 12:52 AM
antonio107 antonio107 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
I was hoping to add something helpful to this, since I'm writing my thesis on organ music in the NHL, and have a chapter looking at the Hammond organ sound as a "hockey synecdoche" so to speak.

I have a book on my shelf that's a very nostalgic rehashing of the history of the instruments (The Hammond Organ: Beauty in The B). In their index, they have about close to a hundred different model numbers listed, and yet there is no mention of J-100; there's a strange gap in between Model H and Model L.

So, judging by this one (authoritative-ish) source on Hammond organs not even bothering to mention the J-100, one could probably guess that it wasn't an especially popular model.

Interesting bit about the L models, which may be applicable to Js, as well:

Quote:
The L-100 was developed and released at the same time as the M-100. They were both designed to replace the M-3 at prices above and below it....The vibrato system wasn't scanner-delay vibrato; it was a three-stage magnetic phase-shift circuit, which gave a fair imitation of...vibrato at the low end, but at the upper end it was very thin...You can't do the same tricks with the three-stage phase-shift that you can with the scanner-delay vibrato.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-23-2010, 01:34 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 31,599
Quote:
Originally Posted by antonio107 View Post
So, judging by this one (authoritative-ish) source on Hammond organs not even bothering to mention the J-100, one could probably guess that it wasn't an especially popular model.
I've never heard of a J model, either, but there is a reference to it here

Quote:
Model J-100

Synopsis: Non-tonewheel Spinet Model, transistor design, no drawbars.
You'll note that it and the K-100 have virtually no other information available about them.

Wait, I found a little more info here.

Quote:
Name: Model J100

Years Of manufacture: 1966/1969

Description:

2 x44 note manuals
13 note pedalboard
Vibrato/Reverb
Legato Percussion
Reiteration
Cymbal/Brush
Transistorized tone generator
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-23-2010, 08:17 AM
cm215 cm215 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Thanks for the replies. I know that the J100 is almost frowned upon but I have the chance of getting one for free... What I'd really like to know if it's worth my trouble of moving it if I'm going to be disappointed because it does have that Hammond sound one attributes to that name. I know it works differently as far as how the sound is generated and everything... I've even see some people say it's the worst Hammond out there!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-23-2010, 06:22 PM
antonio107 antonio107 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by cm215 View Post
Thanks for the replies. I know that the J100 is almost frowned upon but I have the chance of getting one for free... What I'd really like to know if it's worth my trouble of moving it if I'm going to be disappointed because it does have that Hammond sound one attributes to that name. I know it works differently as far as how the sound is generated and everything... I've even see some people say it's the worst Hammond out there!
I'd say that judging by how ridiculously rare it seems to be (this thread comes up on the first page of a google search, lol), that alone makes it worthwhile to get it. The fact that it might not have the fullest vibrato, or whatever, doesn't mean that it's not a novel investment in and of itself. If the Hammond timbre is your only requirement, you can get a much more portable synthesizer that emulates it pretty faithfully. That's my two cents!
Reply With Quote
Reply



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.