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Old 04-30-2011, 04:21 AM
Time Like Tears Time Like Tears is offline
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So it seems I am now allergic to strawberries.

Ok, so this is what happened. Son of a bitch.

Friday afternoon I was getting ready to start preparing for work at 4:30pm. At about 2pm I thought I would have a snack, and grabbed the second half of a pound of strawberries I bought Tuesday evening. I washed them well and set into eating them. I usually dip them in a little granulated sugar, I like the crunch.

Almost immediately I noticed my lips and tongue were tingly, but I put it off to the natural astringent properties of strawberries. It wasn't until I had finished them all (about 6 fat berries) that I realized the tingling was spreading through my whole face, and I was slightly short of breath. I got up to go after my water bottle, and noticed I was rather dizzy and weak feeling. My stomach then started to cramp up, and I felt nauseous. I polled several people as to what I should do, most agreed I probably needed medical attention. I tried to drink some water and I found it hard to swallow, and that's what decided me to call 911, along with the memory of Mom's sudden fire ant allergy that nearly killed her.

I told the 911 dispatcher what was going on and she said she was sending the paramedics over to me. I put on decent clothes and clean undies, gathered the medicines I take daily (ibuprofen, Aleve, multivitamin, and Claritin) and was waiting for them on the front porch. The paramedics and one policeman arrived and checked me over, my blood pressure was a whopping 181/110 (my normal is near 115/70) so little danger of shock, but my blood oxygen saturation was 98% and my pulse rate was elevated but within tolerance. They asked me all the usual questions and I answered them honestly. I couldn't see very well by this point, and was having trouble speaking. I did try to keep talking so I could make sure I wasn't losing mental acuity and so I could gauge by their reactions how much sense I was making.

As my symptoms weren't improving (by this point it had been an hour or so since I ate the berries) and I kept noticing new ones, I decided to ride to the hospital. Money be damned, I didn't feel like dying today. The paramedics were very kind and took good care of me. I stayed calm, and fought the growing panic in my gut. They got me to St John's Medical Center where I told the whole story to three more people. I wasn't allowed to drink yet, so they started an IV to help me stay hydrated and for pushing medicines. It took them three sticks, thanks to my rolly veins. IV went in the crappiest place, the back of my right hand.

A nurse came by and put the little thingies on me to do an EKG, which was normal. They tested my blood and found nothing to cause alarm. My blood pressure and heart rate were slowly getting back into normal range. They gave me Benadryl, Pepcid, and Prednisone intravenously. I very nearly conked out right then, but I fought sleep to make sure it was all going to work. I watched as my pulse rate and blood pressure dropped even further. I literally felt my airways opening back up and I could breathe deeply again. I tried a sip of water and it went down fine. I waited a bit longer until couldn't stand the urge to pee anymore, and asked for help to the bathroom. I was still a but weak and uncoordinated.

When I returned the doctor said it would be all right to remove the IV and let me get on out of there. He gave me a referral to follow up with a physician, suggested an allergy battery test, and cautioned me to avoid strawberries (duh) and other common food allergens until after the allergy test. He told me that when allergies crop up suddenly, it may indicate other physical issues that need attention, as that isn't normal. He gave me a prescription for predniSONE and one for Pepcid, and told me to double up on the Claritin. He said that the fact I take Claritin daily may have prevented a worse episode.

I called my best friend who was kind enough to come and carry me home from the hospital. Currently 11:15pm, my face is still numb, I have no taste in my mouth, and I have severe double vision, with or without my glasses. I am hoping sleep will fix this. My blood pressure right now is 156/98, with a resting heart rate of 102 bpm (geez! all high numbers for me) but for now I am attributing this to stress and the side effects of the drugs I am full of. I will check again in the morning.

So yeah, that was my Friday afternoon! Fun times! Honestly I was scared poopless, despite my many ills, I remain fairly healthy. Let me add some - MOTHERFUCKER. This is two weeks after I canceled my useless health insurance. They were charging me $36 a week for a yearlong waiting period on everything, girly checkups weren't considered 'preventive care' and I would have to pay out of pocket and hope to be reimbursed. Goddammit, I am a chef and a foodie - what other foods that I like are lurking, waiting to try to kill me?

I would hate to be the sad sack who got taken out by a strawberry. My ghost would never get any respect.

Last edited by Time Like Tears; 04-30-2011 at 04:24 AM..
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  #2  
Old 04-30-2011, 04:57 AM
Lynn Bodoni Lynn Bodoni is offline
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Some people who are allergic to strawberries are also allergic to kiwi fruit. So beware.

All in all, I'd have to say that it's just not fair to be allergic to something like strawberries. I'd hate to develop that allergy.
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Old 04-30-2011, 05:32 AM
legalsnugs legalsnugs is offline
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So the take-away from all this is: if you are eating something that makes your mouth go all tingly, stop eating it, right? Thanks.

I understand that allergies can sneak up on a body. I'm very glad you're feeling better.
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Old 04-30-2011, 06:12 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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A word from a fellow food allergy sufferer -

It's not at al unusual to take up to three days before you really start feeling normal again. Even with the drugs it take awhile for the reaction to fully subside.

And yes, food allergies suck.
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Old 04-30-2011, 06:20 AM
Farmer Jane Farmer Jane is offline
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benadryl that shit!

I developed a minor strawberry allergy. I just kept eating them and eating them one year. Yumm. Then I broke out in hives and itchy throat. Prednisone and Benadryl. I waited around 3 years before I ate them again.

Same thing with pineapple and citirus -- itchy uncomfortable throat, but (whew) no hives or shock.
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Old 04-30-2011, 06:24 AM
Time Like Tears Time Like Tears is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Bodoni View Post
Some people who are allergic to strawberries are also allergic to kiwi fruit. So beware.

All in all, I'd have to say that it's just not fair to be allergic to something like strawberries. I'd hate to develop that allergy.
I will be avoiding all known allergen foods as best I can until after my allergy test. And no kidding - a box of strawberries has always been my treat splurge. /sadface

Quote:
Originally Posted by legansnugs
So the take-away from all this is: if you are eating something that makes your mouth go all tingly, stop eating it, right? Thanks.
Generally yes. But there's lots of foods that have astringent properties. Kiwi and muscadine grapes always make my mouth feel a little funny. It took a while for it to spread across my face, and by then those 6 berries were packed away. No one expects their favorite food to turn on them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Broomstick
It's not at all unusual to take up to three days before you really start feeling normal again. Even with the drugs it take awhile for the reaction to fully subside.
Yeah, it also seems that every drug they shot me up with has the side effect of doubled or blurry vision. Hopefully my sense of taste comes back soon, but I don't think I will be delivering any pizzas for a couple of days, much less driving to work.
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Old 04-30-2011, 09:17 AM
6ImpossibleThingsB4Breakfast 6ImpossibleThingsB4Breakfast is offline
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You can't pit strawberries, Time Like Tears.

Only cherries.
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  #8  
Old 04-30-2011, 09:42 AM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is online now
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Olives, too.
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Old 04-30-2011, 11:07 AM
Time Like Tears Time Like Tears is offline
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Hmm. So I pit my immune system! Yeah!
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Old 04-30-2011, 11:56 AM
Lynn Bodoni Lynn Bodoni is offline
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So the take-away from all this is: if you are eating something that makes your mouth go all tingly, stop eating it, right? Thanks.
Welllll, it's a warning sign. My mouth goes all tingly when I eat pepper (white or black), and I'm not actually allergic to it, but it WILL trigger my IBS if I eat more than a very little bit. I don't know if my mouth tingles because I have this reaction to pepper, or if I'm just not used to the taste of pepper.

But yeah, tingling might very well be a danger sign, especially if you've never had it before.
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Old 04-30-2011, 12:16 PM
Nefarious Chipmunk Nefarious Chipmunk is offline
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There is nothing worse then suddenly being allergic to your favorite foods. It reminds me of when I suddenly became allergic to Blue Cheese. It was one of the saddest days of my life (and not just because I was covered with hives...).
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Old 05-01-2011, 06:38 AM
lorene lorene is offline
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Welcome to Oral Allergy Syndrome. I developed an allergy to strawberries (and kiwi and peaches and...the list goes on) in my teenage years, so I, too, know exactly what I'm missing.
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Old 05-01-2011, 10:05 AM
teela brown teela brown is online now
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I think I'm a bit allergic to strawberries, too. I'm not completely sure of it, but I do know that during strawberry season I eat gobs of berries and during that same time I develop hives on my palms, wrists and sometimes eyelids. They're not overwhelming, at least not enough to cause me to stop eating strawberries. Yet.

I've developed an allergy to aspirin in the past year, I'm pretty sure. Both berries and aspirin have salicyl- . . . sali- . . . something, and I'm sure there must be a connection. Last time I took aspirin my whole scalp broke out in hives and the itching drove me mad. So no more aspirin for me.
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Old 05-01-2011, 10:13 AM
Indyellen Indyellen is offline
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Originally Posted by lorene View Post
Welcome to Oral Allergy Syndrome. I developed an allergy to strawberries (and kiwi and peaches and...the list goes on) in my teenage years, so I, too, know exactly what I'm missing.
Wow! Thanks for posting that link. My reaction to eating my allergen foods isn't exactly that (I get that "burned" or "raw" feeling like when you eat too hot pizza) but I always suspected that it was my allergies, and this confirms it. Damn.
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Old 05-01-2011, 10:18 AM
Rysdad Rysdad is offline
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I'm kinda wishing the whole world would develop an allergy to cilantro. Then, we could all, nation by nation, make a united and concerted effort to rid the planet of that noxious weed.

An allergy to strawberries sucks, though. Glad you're feeling better.
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Old 05-01-2011, 10:44 AM
Bridget Burke Bridget Burke is online now
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Damn. A friend developed an allergy to sesame at the age of 50+. He was admitted to the hospital & it took a while for the MD's to discover the cause. Now he avoids the seeds & most Asian cooking. And carries one of those epi-pens in case of accidental exposure.

At least, he said, he wasn't allergic to strawberries or shrimp....

Best wishes. Be careful. But it still sucks.
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Old 05-01-2011, 01:20 PM
curlcoat curlcoat is offline
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I became allergic to melons in my twenties, and this started a long list of foods that I am now allergic to - essentially all fresh fruits and vegetables. As I've aged, the reaction has become less and in some cases almost unnoticeable, so I can, say, eat a banana now where it used to be that I could only have one bite. So use caution when you are eating any raw fruit/berries until after you get tested.

However, I can eat anything that has been cooked - strawberry jam, orange juice, cooked veggies. So it may be that you won't have to totally give up fruits and berries that you love!
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Old 05-01-2011, 01:38 PM
needscoffee needscoffee is offline
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My teenaged daughter recently developed consistent allergic responses to shrimp and crab after loving them her whole life. She's really pissed off that this occurred before she ever had a chance to taste lobster.
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Old 05-01-2011, 01:49 PM
dawson dawson is offline
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Our home-daycare workers' family have allergies to 1) red meat 2) chocolate and 3) dairy. I can't imagine trying to cook for that family on a daily basis!
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Old 05-01-2011, 05:01 PM
kushiel kushiel is offline
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My coworker has an allergy to bee stings.

This, however, did not stop her father from becoming a beekeeper.
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  #21  
Old 05-01-2011, 05:58 PM
Time Like Tears Time Like Tears is offline
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Yeah, Broomstick was absolutely right. Sunday now and I feel worse than I did on Friday, as far as life-affecting symptoms go. Honestly I feel as if I've had a mini-stroke, and I think I know how Keith Richards lives on a daily basis. Half my face is totally numb, I can't walk without stumbling into everything and my motor response and reflexes are about nil. Lingering double vision (sporting a big black eyepatch under my glasses - who's sexy now!) brain feels sluggish. Blood pressure still on the high end of normal, pulserate back to my norm., I am taking the meds and monitoring what vitals I can.

Boy, I am still amazed at the level of fucked-uppedness from something so simple. Thanks for all your well-wishes and I really do hope my updarte is coherent.
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Old 05-01-2011, 06:23 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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My sympathies. Try to get extra rest and fluids until you're back to normal. And you will be back to normal soon. Then you can get tested and know what to avoid so as to minimize the chances you'll have to go through this again.
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Old 05-01-2011, 09:15 PM
Jennmonkye Jennmonkye is offline
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I'm amazed at how many people have posted that they are allergic to strawberries. I, too am allergic to strawberries, pineapple and kiwi...and I have also decided that I am allergic to almonds as well (although other nuts don't seem to be affecting me) and am also highly highly allergic to caffeine. Typically I get itchy mouth and throat, with majorly runny nose after eating any of those (except the caffeine reaction which is much worse and similar to what you described). I never was a fan of any of those fruits, but I love the juices from all three of them and hate that I can't have them. I'm so glad you are feeling better and sorry you are bummed out about not being able to enjoy your treats any more.
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Old 05-02-2011, 12:41 AM
Miller Miller is offline
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I think this sort of discussion would fit better in MPSIMS.
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Old 05-02-2011, 01:03 AM
XRaeth XRaeth is offline
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You have my condolences, food allergies suck. I've had a unique experience with mine. I once reacted to a peanut butter and jelly sandwich even though i had eaten it plenty of times in the past with no trouble. I was quite young at the time but still remember the massive full body rash of hives that ensued. thankfully my throat did not constrict and i was able to breath okay but i was rushed to the hospital nonetheless. several months later, after several allergy tests, they concluded that I was in fact not allergic to peanuts (a skin test and a blood test were done). go figure. So we slowly started introducing peanuts back into my diet and on about the third day bam. Full body rash again. The only thing our doctor could think of was that it builds up in my system until it reaches a toxic level and then my body reacts to it. This seems a little strange to me but I cant think of a more likely reason. I have mainly stayed away from nuts since then (thankfully trace amounts don't seem to bother me) but every once and a while i get a couple hives on my arms or back and I watch myself a little more closely.
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Old 05-02-2011, 05:45 AM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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Originally Posted by Time Like Tears View Post
Generally yes. But there's lots of foods that have astringent properties. Kiwi and muscadine grapes always make my mouth feel a little funny. It took a while for it to spread across my face, and by then those 6 berries were packed away. No one expects their favorite food to turn on them.
Um, no. In most people none of those foods give them that tingly-feeling reaction. Don't eat these foods either, since you're probably at least mildly allergic to them as well.
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Old 05-02-2011, 09:55 AM
kittenblue kittenblue is offline
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My ex was allergic to strawberries, but it wasn't a sudden thing...he'd been allergic all his life. If the berries were frozen, then there was no problem, because that particular enzyme was destroyed in the freezing process. In all the time I knew him, I only saw one reaction...from eating another piece of fruit from a fruit tray...the strawberries on the tray had leaked juices onto the pineapple or the melon. Fortunately his reactions weren't quite as systemic as yours, just hives and a bit of trouble breathing until the Benadryl took effect.
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Old 05-02-2011, 09:59 AM
gallows fodder gallows fodder is online now
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Um, no. In most people none of those foods give them that tingly-feeling reaction. Don't eat these foods either, since you're probably at least mildly allergic to them as well.
Seconding this, for the good of the people. If your mouth or throat feels funny after eating something, and it's not supposed to be spicy, that's a bad sign. Don't eat those foods again.
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Old 05-02-2011, 10:40 AM
Ike Witt Ike Witt is offline
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I remember going for a CAT scan once. They did one scan and then gave me some dye for a second scan. Before giving me the dye they asked me if I was allergic to either fish or strawberries. I am not allergic to either so I get the shot and promptly break out in big itchy hives all over my body.
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Old 05-02-2011, 11:15 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Originally Posted by gallows fodder View Post
Seconding this, for the good of the people. If your mouth or throat feels funny after eating something, and it's not supposed to be spicy, that's a bad sign. Don't eat those foods again.
Thirded!

I'd be very very if I had to give up strawberries... but if I'd developed an allergy and couldn't make myself give 'em up, I suspect my family would be even more .

For what it's worth: as I understand it, blood testing is more accurate for food allergies than skin testing is.

Dweezil has a known peanut allergy (at about age 16 months, I gave him some PB/crackers and within 10 minutes his face was swollen and eyes itching...). A visit to an allergist, who did skin testing just in case, but wouldn't even do a peanut test because of the risk. He showed "positive" for a number of things he'd eaten without incident, so we had to do some food challenges (withhold for 3+ weeks, then slowly reintroduce). All were reintroduced without problem.

Since then the blood testing technology has improved and they do that for him when he revisits every couple of years.

We've been lucky in his exposures - apparently he's not one of those who can't be in the same room as peanut butter. He had a probable exposure at age 6 (some store-brand rice krispie treats that appeared to have been contaminated or mislabeled), which caused him to have a nasty case of hives for a couple of days. Nothing since then until last summer, when a combination of unawareness of ingredients and poor communication led to him feasting on chicken in mole sauce. Poor kid - he felt nauseous (and we had to stop the car several times on the way back to our hotel because he thought he needed to hurl). An hour or so later he finally did and was OK after that. Typo Knig, who had the same dish, was fine. I called the restaurant and yep, peanuts in the mole (which I'd known, but the guys were at a different table and they didn't know it was verboten).

We were kicking ourselves - we have been lax about having his epi-pens handy since he's gone so long without any kind of reaction.
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Old 05-02-2011, 01:25 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Ah, epi-pens....

When I lost my insurance I lost my epi-pens. Then I got insurance back BUT the new insurance doesn't want to pay for an epi-pen because they don't see any reason to - apparently they want either a blood test saying I'm allergic, or records of my being in the ER due to an allergic reaction. Recently. They discount that last visit from 20 years ago "because things might have changed, maybe you aren't allergic to that anymore" but they won't pay for a blood test because I haven't been in the ER! Nevermind I have documented allergies back forever. Oh, but they might accept my original blood test. Which was 36 years ago. At an outpatient clinic. Which no longer exists. And no, we don't have a copy of that piece of paper, which apparently was lost sometime during the ensuing 3.5 decades and 14 different residences across three different states... But who are they fooling? I'm sure even if I DID find that piece of paper they'd demand something more recent.

So, basically, even though I have severe food allergies, which are documented over decades, because I've been a good girl and haven't eaten anything on the forbidden list for nearly a quarter century they refuse to give me an epi-pen for just in case I screw up. Even though it's standard practice to issue epi-pens to people with food allergies.



I do routinely carry Benadryl and my inhaler, I just hope that will be enough if something bad happens.
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Old 05-02-2011, 01:33 PM
kittenblue kittenblue is offline
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Ah, epi-pens....

When I lost my insurance I lost my epi-pens.

So, basically, even though I have severe food allergies, which are documented over decades, because I've been a good girl and haven't eaten anything on the forbidden list for nearly a quarter century they refuse to give me an epi-pen for just in case I screw up. Even though it's standard practice to issue epi-pens to people with food allergies.



I do routinely carry Benadryl and my inhaler, I just hope that will be enough if something bad happens.
How much do epi-pens cost? Couldn't you pay for the prescription yourself and get one?
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Old 05-02-2011, 01:39 PM
Man With a Cat Man With a Cat is offline
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My dad developed a strawberry allergy when he was around 40, along with an allergy to shrimp.

My sister became allergic to shrimp about when she turned 40.

One day, I was about 41 and made some shrimp alfredo. Within an hour I was one giant red splotch. I sekf-treated myself with Benadryl (and red wine) and felt better. I never saw a doctor over it, but I tell doctors it happened. Haven't had shrimp since. Don't miss it enough to care.
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Old 05-02-2011, 02:22 PM
curlcoat curlcoat is offline
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Um, no. In most people none of those foods give them that tingly-feeling reaction. Don't eat these foods either, since you're probably at least mildly allergic to them as well.
I was wondering about that - the only foods that make my mouth feel tingly are those that I am allergic to.
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Old 05-02-2011, 02:50 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Ah, epi-pens....

When I lost my insurance I lost my epi-pens. Then I got insurance back BUT the new insurance doesn't want to pay for an epi-pen because they don't see any reason to - apparently they want either a blood test saying I'm allergic, or records of my being in the ER due to an allergic reaction. Recently. They discount that last visit from 20 years ago "because things might have changed, maybe you aren't allergic to that anymore" but they won't pay for a blood test because I haven't been in the ER! Nevermind I have documented allergies back forever. Oh, but they might accept my original blood test. Which was 36 years ago. At an outpatient clinic. Which no longer exists. And no, we don't have a copy of that piece of paper, which apparently was lost sometime during the ensuing 3.5 decades and 14 different residences across three different states... But who are they fooling? I'm sure even if I DID find that piece of paper they'd demand something more recent.

So, basically, even though I have severe food allergies, which are documented over decades, because I've been a good girl and haven't eaten anything on the forbidden list for nearly a quarter century they refuse to give me an epi-pen for just in case I screw up. Even though it's standard practice to issue epi-pens to people with food allergies.



I do routinely carry Benadryl and my inhaler, I just hope that will be enough if something bad happens.
indeed!!!

When Dweezil was first prescribed his epi-pen, our insurance (at the time) similarly refused to pay for it. We could have written a letter and gotten documentation from the doctors, and appealed it... but decided not to bother.

Sheesh. Epi-pens aren't exactly something someone would have around for fun. I have memories of allergy meds that made me hyper (back when oral epinephrine was commonly used for asthma) - and it was NOT an enjoyable feeling. Any chance you could appeal?

Both my kids use Aero-chambers with their inhalers. Moon Unit uses one daily; Dweezil maybe once a year. It's a crapshoot as to whether our prescription insurance pays for those... our current insurance doesn't; the insurance we had before that did... I suppose we could try filing them through the main insurance's Durable Medical Equipment clause...
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Old 05-02-2011, 03:18 PM
limegreen limegreen is offline
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Just in the last year I have noticed I have become allergic to fresh pineapple and cinnamon. This has been since the chemo and the massive doses of steroids, so I sort of chalked it up to that, but I guess you can develop allergies at any time.
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Old 05-02-2011, 03:20 PM
Lightray Lightray is offline
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Many food allergies will grow worse with each exposure. So you can eat the food for years without symptoms, but suddenly find yourself with tingly lips or hives or trouble breathing or somesuch. I had that happen with tree nuts (and the crossover allergy to stone fruits) and berries.

Other food allergies, this does not happen, but I've been told those can be allergies that appear or disappear over time.

If you've got symptoms of the first type -- tingly lips or hives from eating -- best get to an allergist, or stop eating the stuff. In most cases those allergies only get worse -- you're not going to "develop an immunity" by eating the food occasionally. There are some desensitization programs, though.

The OP's experience makes me very happy my mother finally stopped trying to slip me food with nuts "because I was just being picky". My nephew is much more allergic to nuts, and she didn't want to kill him. (Obviously, then, she'd had no such issues about killing me.)

Last edited by Lightray; 05-02-2011 at 03:21 PM..
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Old 05-02-2011, 06:20 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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How much do epi-pens cost? Couldn't you pay for the prescription yourself and get one?
I have had no income other than food stamps and my dad paying my rent for the past five months. No, I do not have the money. I had to borrow money to buy toilet paper last week.
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Old 05-02-2011, 07:40 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
I have had no income other than food stamps and my dad paying my rent for the past five months. No, I do not have the money. I had to borrow money to buy toilet paper last week.
And a two-pack of them (at drugstore.com) costs 170.00 without insurance. There is, at present, no generic version.

Oh, and the damn things have a VERY short shelf life (less than a year).
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  #40  
Old 05-02-2011, 07:41 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Originally Posted by Lightray View Post
...(Obviously, then, she'd had no such issues about killing me.)
You were a difficult child?
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  #41  
Old 05-03-2011, 05:50 AM
PunditLisa PunditLisa is offline
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Strawberries dipped in sugar? BLASPHEMY!

Sorry about your reaction. Berify with your doctor, but in the future, I'd take a dose of Benadryl the very second I felt tingly. Have it on hand at all times, including the car. And I'd sure ask for an Epi-pen.

We have several Epi-pens because my husband has asthma and my daughter has hives-inducing allergies to just about everything. Had no idea that they expired in one year. I guess a trip to the physician is in order.
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  #42  
Old 05-03-2011, 07:30 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Many doctors seem to have a disturbing tendency to issue an epi-pen then never renew the prescription, as if they lasted a lifetime or something.

The other thing that always got me about them is that you're supposed to keep them with you at all times BUT you're supposed to always keep it at room temperature or nearly so. Oh, really? How do you propose I do that when I'm waiting for a bus on a street corner when it's -10F ? Or when I'm working outside for 8 hours on a 90 F day? Do medical people have any contact with the real world?
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Old 05-03-2011, 10:22 AM
Lynn Bodoni Lynn Bodoni is offline
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We're supposed to live like lab rats, in a lab, where all of our meals are kibble, which has been carefully formulated to supply us with our daily requirements of nutrients, vitamins, and minerals, with all of that nasty flavor (of any sort) removed.

And I guess that you'll just have to enjoy a BLT, and go to the ER to document the resulting allergy attack Broomstick.
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  #44  
Old 05-03-2011, 10:27 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Originally Posted by Lynn Bodoni View Post
We're supposed to live like lab rats, in a lab, where all of our meals are kibble, which has been carefully formulated to supply us with our daily requirements of nutrients, vitamins, and minerals, with all of that nasty flavor (of any sort) removed.

And I guess that you'll just have to enjoy a BLT, and go to the ER to document the resulting allergy attack Broomstick.
Yep .

Oh, and for anyone considering such an experiment, best to snack on it **in the ER waiting room**. More seriously: I remember someone once posting to an allergy email list, that their doctor was so concerned about an allergy to something or other that the only way the doctor would consent to a challenge would be in a hospital setting, with an IV already in place, and with crash-cart equipment at hand. IIRC, the person in question declined to do the experiment.
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Old 05-03-2011, 11:39 AM
aruvqan aruvqan is offline
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Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
Yep .

Oh, and for anyone considering such an experiment, best to snack on it **in the ER waiting room**. More seriously: I remember someone once posting to an allergy email list, that their doctor was so concerned about an allergy to something or other that the only way the doctor would consent to a challenge would be in a hospital setting, with an IV already in place, and with crash-cart equipment at hand. IIRC, the person in question declined to do the experiment.
Only reason I survived a penicilllin dosing was being in hospital at the time ... the supervising poopooed me telling them i was allergic to pennicillin because i had 'no documentation' other than remembering my doctor telling my mom I was allergic ...

Oops.

I carry epi pens because of my mushroom allergy, actually.
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  #46  
Old 05-03-2011, 11:55 AM
Lynn Bodoni Lynn Bodoni is offline
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Heh, I developed an allergy to Levaquin while I was getting it via IV in a hospital. I'd had two bags of it, no problem, the nurse hung the third bag and started it going about 1 AM. At 1:20 I was hollering for a nurse to come in and bring some Benadryl IV, I was breaking out in hives and was horribly itchy. I guess my immune system decided that Levaquin was a danger to me at 1:01.
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  #47  
Old 05-03-2011, 02:17 PM
curlcoat curlcoat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
The other thing that always got me about them is that you're supposed to keep them with you at all times BUT you're supposed to always keep it at room temperature or nearly so. Oh, really? How do you propose I do that when I'm waiting for a bus on a street corner when it's -10F ?
In a pocket next to your body.

Quote:
Or when I'm working outside for 8 hours on a 90 F day? Do medical people have any contact with the real world?
I used one of those coolers that has a zippered pocket for sandwiches, outside of the area where the ice goes.

Medication cannot always be easy to store.
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  #48  
Old 05-03-2011, 02:27 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Originally Posted by curlcoat View Post
In a pocket next to your body.
Obviously, neither you nor the designers of these devices have worn formal woman's clothing, which features an astounding lack of pockets.

Equally obviously, you've never tried to put one of those things into a pocket. They certainly don't fit in any pocket of any pair of jeans I've ever worn, much less any other clothing pocket. You'd need at least a medium size purse. At least. And that still wouldn't keep it cool on a hot day.

Really, Lynn Bodoni has the right of it.

Quote:
I used one of those coolers that has a zippered pocket for sandwiches, outside of the area where the ice goes.
Every epi pen I've ever owned (and I've owned quite a few over the years) is too long to fit into such a "pocket". Epi "pen" is a bit of a misnomer, it's more Epi Big Huge Jumbo Marker - no, that's not right either. They're still larger/longer than any marker I've ever seen. Unless there's been some miniaturization breakthrough recently I'm unaware of.

Quote:
Medication cannot always be easy to store.
Yes, I know - I have diabetics in my life, they have even worse problems.
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  #49  
Old 05-03-2011, 02:31 PM
curlcoat curlcoat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
Obviously, neither you nor the designers of these devices have worn formal woman's clothing, which features an astounding lack of pockets.

Equally obviously, you've never tried to put one of those things into a pocket. They certainly don't fit in any pocket of any pair of jeans I've ever worn, much less any other clothing pocket. You'd need at least a medium size purse. At least. And that still wouldn't keep it cool on a hot day.
No, I've never worn formal womens clothing but when I lived north I did have a parka with large inside pockets that would accommodate an Epipen.

However, since you don't seem to want help with this, I'll quit offering.
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  #50  
Old 05-03-2011, 03:17 PM
Time Like Tears Time Like Tears is offline
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I dunno guys. it's been 4 days now and I cannit function. at this point I htink it's the medicine, but I can't drive to get myself in front of a doctor. I think the perdnisone is messing me up. my facr=e still numb and I am dizzy and double vision. no coordination and I finally did msnsge to fall on the stairs. Clearly can't type well. I am trying to get to the DR asap
because this should have passed by now, My father can't believe I got so messed up by a strawberry (neither cen I) but here it is. I will ask about epi pens etc when I can see the doctor. I bought a big bix of benadryl and split it around so I can always get st some. There is strawberry in lotd of food. thank you all again for your well-wishes and concern.
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