The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > In My Humble Opinion (IMHO)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-07-2011, 02:31 PM
Napier Napier is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 7,878
Arm in sling for 6 months - how to prepare?

What should I do to prepare for having my arm in a sling for up to 6 months (24/7 mandatory except showers), then part time thereafter?

My rotator cuff needs work and they're telling me to expect to have to wear it 4 to 6 months day and night. My lower arm, and my other arm, are fine. This is my NON-dominant arm.

I bought a recliner and some shirts that button closed, and have been practicing doing things one-handed (which I have tended to do for a while as it got worse anyway). My car is an automatic. I am trying to figure out rearranging my pockets but might rely on the sling to hold my cellphone. We're going to get one of those little lap desks so I can use my laptop, which they tell me I can do as long as it's down low.

What else should I do? Any conveniences I should buy? Any other advice?

Thanks!
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 08-07-2011, 02:55 PM
Digital is the new Analog Digital is the new Analog is offline
Apple Advisory Board
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Mount Crumpit
Posts: 3,859
My father has rotator cuff surgery on his right (non-dominate) shoulder about two weeks ago. He's in a sling, and didn't have too much trouble with it for the first week* or so. I'll probably be talking to him later today - I'll ask if he has any specific advice.

If you don't feel too foolish, try wearing a sling (or mock one up with a pillow case or ace bandage) for a bit to see when it gives you trouble.


* I absolutely do NOT recommend you do what he did..namely, get up in the middle of the night, pass out, and fall down. Dislocate a finger on the left hand, which means he now can't really use either side. Plus other misc. injuries that don't apply to this thread. The point is, be a little extra careful.


-D/a
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-07-2011, 02:59 PM
AncientHumanoid AncientHumanoid is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Comfortable loafers.

A pancho might come in handy as the weather gets colder and wetter.

Man, six months ... I would be having to carry a tripod everywhere for my camera.

A wheeled briefcase, maybe, for all the day to day business stuff.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-07-2011, 04:00 PM
FeAudrey FeAudrey is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
(shoulder/arm/hand issues Doper here)


Ask for a referral to a physiotherapist who can set you up with shoulder-sparing exercises to retain as much arm, hand, and core strength and mobility as possible. That will minimize later physiotherapy work when you are recovered.

Expect balance issues, as well. Not having sensory input from all four limbs affects this. Some stuff you do standing up, such as dressing, you may find easier sitting down.


Take a look at computer adaptions for mobility/dexterity issues:

http://www.microsoft.com/enable/guides/dexterity.aspx


There are lots of gadgets for assistance in dressing, kitchen work, etc. I'd recommend clamps that hold things for you. There are a lot of tasks that you do with one hand, but with that hand relying on the other hand to hold something in place.

Arthritis is the commonest disability for which this stuff is marketed, so maybe include that term in any googling you do.


Allow extra time for everything. Think about how you are going to do things before doing them.

Being on autopilot, or rushing things, can result in minor injuries that delay recovery, or frustrating mess-ups that end up with a task taking longer than if you had taken more time up front.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-07-2011, 08:42 PM
Lips_Obsession Lips_Obsession is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
As FeAudrey mentioned, I would be concerned about losing muscle strength and mobility in the arm you aren't using... See what you can do to exercise that arm without interfering with your shoulder rehab.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-07-2011, 09:27 PM
ZipperJJ ZipperJJ is online now
And Finn The Human
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 18,728
Have you considered headsets for your cell phone and landline (if you have one)?

Do you have a wheely cart you could use for transporting things you normally might have transported with two arms? For example groceries from the car, a full laundry basket, etc)

Have you practiced getting up and down from various chairs at home and at work with one hand, or no hands? Don't want to sit down somewhere and find yourself stuck!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-07-2011, 09:57 PM
digs digs is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Not a doc, but are you SURE you need the surgery? I've heard stories of people avoiding rotator cuff surgery with just the right physical therapy.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-07-2011, 10:14 PM
JBDivmstr JBDivmstr is offline
Member
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Question... Will the rotator cuff surgery inhibit your ability to use your hand or fingers in any way?

Upper arm strength and mobility will be your major issues IMO.

I incurred a crushed wrist (left, non-dominant) which necessitated 4 pins and a plate w/screws to put it all back together.
I had to have a cast that prevented me from flexing my elbow. (picture, lower arm at 90 degree angle to torso) Consequently, my upper arm movement was also restricted to a degree. After the removal of the long cast, I was very surprised at the pain in my upper arm, just below the shoulder. The lack of strength and limited mobility was a major issue for quite a few months, afterward.
All of that was from simply not moving it, for an extended length of time.

You're in for a long, mentally trying (trieing?) and physically tiring, recovery process.

I wish you all the best, and a speedy recovery.
(And I hope that you have others that will be able to assist you, you willl need it, especially, at first.)
__________________
"Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut." Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961)
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-07-2011, 11:04 PM
Enter the Flagon Enter the Flagon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
When I tore my rotator cuff, I was on my own without health insurance.

One of the things I learned was that accidentally rolling onto that shoulder while asleep was not a good thing to do. To prevent doing it, I used an Ace Bandage to attach a tennis ball to that side of my torso before going to bed. I also found shoes that I could get my feet into without tying laces.

A year later, when I had enough range of motion to do some limited weight work with the arm, it didn't take too long for the strength to come back - probably 6 months. But it was many years before the shoulder itself felt 100% better. I hope, and expect, that your recovery with surgery goes better than mine without.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-08-2011, 03:30 AM
psychonaut psychonaut is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
If the sling prevents you from using both hands to type, then configure your computer to use one of the Dvorak one-handed keyboard layouts. It will take you a couple of weeks of practice, but after this you will find you can type remarkably quickly, and moreover without having to move your hand very much, as the most commonly used letters will be under your fingertips.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 08-08-2011, 06:27 AM
Napier Napier is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 7,878
Quote:
Originally Posted by FeAudrey View Post
There are lots of gadgets for assistance in dressing, kitchen work, etc. I'd recommend clamps that hold things for you. There are a lot of tasks that you do with one hand, but with that hand relying on the other hand to hold something in place.

Arthritis is the commonest disability for which this stuff is marketed, so maybe include that term in any googling you do.
This is way interesting. I will look. Any other advice on where to find the stuff, or which gadgets are most useful?

I was already picturing a gadget that mounts to the wall, and has a foot pedal. There are maybe 3 or 4 little clamps sticking out at different heights including belt height. When you step on the pedal, it closes the clamps. If I found such a thing for sale I'd buy it.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08-08-2011, 06:36 AM
Napier Napier is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 7,878
In answer to other questions -

First, yeah, I really need the surgery. The shoulder's been bad for years but has gotten worse lately We tried PT and injections, in fact gave it extra time because of scheduling difficulties for surgery. I probably put it off too long as it is. Now having my arm lifted only works slooooowly, like over half a minute, and there's no way I can do it by its own muscles.

I have physical therapists I really like. In fact, they are the ones that recommended this surgeon, along with my GP. I will be working with them for exercises both before and after the sling.

The surgeon tells me I will be able to use my hand for things like typing and light holding. I am encouraged to exercise my hand and to flex my arm at the elbow (I'm uncertain how that works with the sling but figure I will understand once I'm in it).

Balance issues are scary. It didn't occur to me. I already have balance issues, both Meniere's and also some spinal damage and a partly paralyzed foot. Plus we have stairs. I'm going to have to be most thoughtful about that one.

I sure do appreciate all the things folks are bringing up. Lots of great stuff here, much of which I didn't think of. Thanks!!
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 08-08-2011, 06:57 AM
LouisB LouisB is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Seminole, FL
Posts: 8,213
Try to master buckling your belt and zipping your pants one handed first; it's the things like that that teach you how much you've learned to depend on having two functional hands. Loafers are a very good thing, as someone said. Putting on a pair of socks one handed will be difficult; I can't imagine dealing with a pair of gloves.

I found Walgreen's to be a good source for "gadgets" for a lot of uses.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 08-08-2011, 07:38 AM
constanze constanze is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Napier View Post
This is way interesting. I will look. Any other advice on where to find the stuff,
Don't know about your specific region, but generally speaking, some charities collect used but still working gadgets from people who needed them only short-term and donate them to people who can't afford them; maybe you could talk to them, since you know that unlike an arthritis sufferer, you will need the gadgets only for a limited time.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08-08-2011, 10:13 AM
Blaster Master Blaster Master is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
I broke my wrist on my dominant hand and, because of the bone that was fractured, it required a full length cast from the tip of my thumb to my armpit for 6 months. At least in your case, it's your non-dominant hand and you'll have some use of your hand.

My advice is to start practicing doing everyday things with just one hand. There's tons of things that you probably use 2 hands for and don't even realize how difficult it will be with just one, like tying your shoes, buttoning your shirt, etc.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 08-08-2011, 12:51 PM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 31,797
I had my left hand in a full cast for 4 weeks and a short one for 7 weeks.

The first thing is to get some elastic waistband pants.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 08-08-2011, 12:59 PM
Sarahfeena Sarahfeena is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2006
If you like to read but don't have an e-reader, it might be a good time to get one. It's much easier to hold with one hand than a book. (My sister has a new baby, so she's often got only one hand free, and she finds it a godsend.)
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 08-08-2011, 01:51 PM
AllShookDown AllShookDown is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
I had this surgery (completely torn supraspinatus tendon) a couple of years ago and was also told I'd have to have my arm in a sling for 6 months. When I went for my two week post-op visit and asked if I had to wear that thing 24/7, he told me no. I never put it back on again and I think not babying it completely actually speeded up my progress. I'm not suggesting you do that w/o your surgeon's approval but don't be afraid to ask.

As others have said, elastic-waist pants & slip-on shoes are very helpful. I also bought the button up shirts (pajama tops, actually) but it didn't take long before I learned there's another way to take off a shirt over your head (put the bad arm hand on the fridge or something and pull on the back of the collar/neckhole). Who knew? Still not the easiest thing to do with a bad shoulder but it works.

Putting on coats: Put the sleeve on the bad arm. Use the good arm to put the hand of the bad arm on the wall at enough of an angle to hold the sleeve on there until you can get the good arm sleeve on.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist if the meds you'll be taking will cause constipation. You may need a laxative.

It took a good year and a half before my shoulder felt at least 90% all the time. When your shoulder does feel better, be careful about not overdoing it. After mine felt better I lifted something that was too heavy and strained all the surrounding muscles that were compensating for the weak ones and it took a good three weeks to recover from that.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 08-08-2011, 02:14 PM
Napier Napier is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 7,878
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllShookDown View Post
I had this surgery (completely torn supraspinatus tendon) a couple of years ago and was also told I'd have to have my arm in a sling for 6 months.
The biggest thing I'm having done is removal of a 1 by 2.5 cm wad of calcium in this same tendon. If we're lucky the tendon does not need to be severed but they're hinting that it will be, and they'll reattach it with some kind of little implant. That's the deciding factor in the 4-6 mos. thing.

I don't think I would be as brave as you with it, though.

So, what's the deal with shirts? I already can't lift my arm well, and I wear pullover shirts all the time. I slide them up my arm and fish my head through to put them on, and grab the collar in back to pull it over my head and drop the shirt down the arm to take it off. Maybe this is what I will be doing here?
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 08-08-2011, 09:35 PM
Romeo and Whatsherface Romeo and Whatsherface is offline
Suspended
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 234
FWIW, a friend of mine had rotator cuff surgery 2 1/2 months ago. He was told beforehand it would be five months before he had full use and range of motion of that shoulder. At his last doctor's appointment, two weeks ago, he was told he did not need to wear the sling full-time, just when he felt more comfortable with it on. He has limited range of motion and can't hold anything heavier than a loaf of bread. Not saying his experience and yours would be identical, just that maybe you won't be quite as restricted for quite as long as they're estimating at this point.

For my friend, it's been pretty frustrating to do things one-handed. I'm sure he wishes he had had your foresight. His wife has been a huge help. You don't live alone, do you? That would be tougher.

Wishing you a speedy and full recovery!
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 08-09-2011, 06:28 AM
AllShookDown AllShookDown is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Napier View Post
So, what's the deal with shirts? I already can't lift my arm well, and I wear pullover shirts all the time. I slide them up my arm and fish my head through to put them on, and grab the collar in back to pull it over my head and drop the shirt down the arm to take it off. Maybe this is what I will be doing here?
I'd never in my life taken off a shirt that way before. It never occured to me to do it. I've always crossed my arms, grabbed the hem and pulled it over my head from there. Since that tendon was totally torn, I couldn't raise my right arm using its own power at all. It didn't hurt. I just didn't work and I had to learn the "new" way to take off a shirt.

Good luck with your surgery. I hope you only have to have the "minor" part. The nerve block they did on me was pretty cool but took a looooooong time to wear off. It was many, many hours before I wasn't numb any more.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 08-09-2011, 07:01 AM
Napier Napier is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 7,878
Thanks, all. I am supposed to get there in 2.5 hours. We'll see how it goes.

Yes, I'm married. That's a help.

Walgreens didn't have anything noteworthy, though I checked out two of them. I wish I had had the foresight, and that this was scheduled for longer in advance, so that I had mail ordered a few things. I may yet try my spring clamps on the edge of the bookshelf.

At the moment my wonder is about using ice. Their instructions refer to a "cryo-cuff", one of which we have here from an old knee surgery, but it's crossed out and "ice" is written in. I hope they give me a cooler with a pump in it, like one friend got, but just in case I get nothing I bought a couple water bottles last night.

I had a nerve block on my lower body, from chest down, years ago. It was for lithotripsy. I remember how odd it was to be temporarily separated from half of me, but not problematic.

We'll see! Thanks everybody for all the great ideas and the kind wishes!
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 08-09-2011, 07:18 AM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is offline
Prickly
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: North Shore of LI
Posts: 13,429
Good luck and report back!
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 08-09-2011, 10:05 AM
Colibri Colibri is online now
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 25,424
Since the OP is looking for advice, let's move this over to IMHO.

Colibri
General Questions Moderator
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 08-09-2011, 02:17 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 9,797
Haven't done it for 6 months, but HAVE done it for a few weeks.

Pullover shirts are possible, but should be reasonably stretchy. You slide it over the bad arm, then use the other arm to stretch it over your head and work the other army into it.

I don't recall whether you're an XX or XY sort, so bras might or might not be an issue: those require a little practice. You might (if possible) want to have someone else help you there - you can use the good army to get the strap on the bad arm / shoulder, then have the other person fasten it in back. Alternately you can use the bad arm to pin one end of the unhooked bra against your stomach while you somehow sling the rest around your waist, fasten it with the good arm, then work it around the front way. Then you stick your bad hand through the strap, and use the good arm to do the rest of the work.

Some stretchy sports-type bras (like Decent Exposures) are another option.

Something to try: Wear a sling around the house for a few days *before* the surgery. That might give you some insight into things to accommodate your broken wing afterward.

Oh yeah - I don't know if this would work for you, but with my most recent broken elbow, I found a formal *sling* was almost useless - the arm kept sliding out of it and I'd wind up with it drooping underneath my upper arm. Instead, I bought a long, thin scarf, knotted it, looped it around the neck/shoulder like a sling - and rested my wrist on the bottom of the loop.

That reduced the elbow movement, and my hand stayed put. Sheer dumb luck that I tried this - I was carrying a purse that I wore cross-body, and realized that resting the wrist on the purse worked pretty darn well .
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 08-09-2011, 02:18 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 9,797
Hah - on re-read, I find the surgery is today, so obviously ignore my suggestion to try the sling out beforehand .
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 08-09-2011, 02:28 PM
Scubaqueen Scubaqueen is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
having already been through this with the former fiance let me say this: ice, ice and more ice. ice is your friend. did i mention you will need to ice the whole area regularly? a lot?

also don't be a hero. take the painkillers as prescribed. stay ahead of the pain if at all possible. your body will thank you later and you will heal faster. take the pain pills as prescribed.

one last bit: stay on top of your medical coverage. the fiance ran into a snafu that delayed his starting PT and that set him back far further in his recovery. make sure you're on track to begin PT when cleared to by the surgeon.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 08-10-2011, 06:07 AM
Napier Napier is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 7,878
My report back to everybody: The surgery was done without incident. I lucked out, and some of the posts drive home how lucky I am. I got the easier version of the surgery, and did not have to separate my supraspinatus from its anchor point. He said he got a huge solid chunk of calcium out of it , the largest he has ever seen in this surgery. He had to cut into the tendon somewhat but did not need to part it. He said this thing should have caused me a great deal of pain and trouble.

I am typing now with the sling off. But that's the only thing I've tried without it.

Having taken my narcotic for the morning, I find it's a little hard to stay focused, so away with me - but I am most happy that you have all taken the time to help me out!

Thank you Mama Zappa. I agree with you regarding the suggestion I take retroactive steps. I have been wearing one occasionally, though. I'm male. Bras are not an issue, but it did take a good 20 minutes to mow my chest and back, from the centerline all the way out to my arm and down to nipple level. This is the longest hair I own, and there's so much it actually makes my shirts fit a little differently and unsymmetrically.

Scubaqueen, thanks. I am taking meds every 6 hours, as I understand you need less of them if you do it this way.

Last edited by Napier; 08-10-2011 at 06:07 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 08-10-2011, 07:05 AM
VunderBob VunderBob is online now
Mostly harmless
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: The VunderLair
Posts: 14,472
I came to this party late. VWife had her shoulder rebuilt 2 days after last Christmas, and on re-read, her procedure was probably much more involved than yours. Her entire meniscus separated from the bone, so your mileage will vary.

Don't even try to use your arm for whatever period the doctor says. Undoing your surgery is extremely easy.

Take your meds religiously, and be vigilant with your therapy.

Consider sleeping on the couch as a step between the recliner and your bed. VWife found that the couch back made a good nighttime support for the healing arm.

Beware of any pets that like to jump on you, or camp on your chest when you lay down. Also, be vigilant to reduce or eliminate trip and fall hazards.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 08-10-2011, 10:21 AM
Napier Napier is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 7,878
Quote:
Originally Posted by VunderBob View Post
Consider sleeping on the couch as a step between the recliner and your bed. VWife found that the couch back made a good nighttime support for the healing arm.
This is an interesting one. I heard it also from a friend on Monday. The picture I get is that the victim tries sleeping in whichever internal 3-way corner of the couch puts the surgical arm on top. Last night in the recliner was OK, but it was only my first. Don't know how long it will be before I get tired of it.

Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 08-10-2011, 10:50 AM
Scubaqueen Scubaqueen is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Napier View Post
Last night in the recliner was OK, but it was only my first. Don't know how long it will be before I get tired of it.
uh, yeah. about the recliner. the ex fiance lived in that recliner at night for quite a while, which wasn't much fun for either of us, frankly, but he needed to be comfortable and lying down flat was impossible, even with elventy-billion pillows for support.

even after he healed, trying to lie in bed wasn't possible for a while. gravity tended to put too much pressure on the muscles, etc. and made him miserable. you may run into the same thing - or not. it just depends on the surgery and how well you recover. i recommend you don't force the issue. the shoulder will let you know when you can go back to a regular bed.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 08-10-2011, 11:37 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 9,797
I personally find it hard to sleep sitting up at all, and don't sleep well on my back. Gotta be on my side (though I often move onto my back during the night).

When you feel up to lying on the regular bed, you can try using extra pillows to prop your army in the desired position. Maybe one of these full-body pillows in front of you or something.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 08-10-2011, 01:08 PM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 31,797
I sleep on the floor on my stomach with my arms at my sides--a position that is physically impossible with a full cast on one's arm.

It took me two nights to fall asleep in a fetal position with my encasted arm over my head--a position I slept in for quite a while after the final cast came off.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 08-10-2011, 03:30 PM
Napier Napier is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 7,878
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
I sleep on the floor on my stomach with my arms at my sides--a position that is physically impossible with a full cast on one's arm.
Wow, that sounds like it would be really uncomfortable. Can I ask how you came to sleep in that position? For a while I slept on the floor but would be rolled halfway between one side and my stomach, and have the lower arm below my head. It's hard for me to picture sleeping as you do!
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 08-10-2011, 03:51 PM
Phlosphr Phlosphr is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: in a Moot
Posts: 11,619
I had surgery on my left non-dominant hand and it's been a month without use of it. I mainly slowed waaay down and didn't overdo it.

That said, I love my Windows 7 voice controls for my lap-top. It took about an hour to configure, and to train it to my voice, but right now I love it!
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 08-11-2011, 07:07 AM
Napier Napier is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 7,878
Things are going surprisingly well right now. I'm about at the 40 hour mark, haven't had any painkillers in 8 hours, slept in the recliner and then napped a little bit in the bed, and am typing fairly comfortably. The pain is very roughly similar to what it was presurgery, though distributed a little differently. I am slowly and carefully using the arm, and getting used to where the limits of comfortable motion are. They did tell me that, because they did not separate the tendon from the bone, I could let comfort be my guide. After all the warnings I got, I'm surprised - I guess the warnings were aimed at the situation where they would have separated the tendon.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 08-11-2011, 09:51 PM
Napier Napier is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 7,878
Wow. Another nearly 15 hours on, and it certainly hurts way less than it did presurgery. Still has sensitive areas in the range of motion, and I'm guarded about moving it, but just sitting here feels fantastic!

Feel free to warn me not to get cocky. I don't mean to.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 08-12-2011, 08:13 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 31,797
Quote:
Originally Posted by Napier View Post
Wow, that sounds like it would be really uncomfortable. Can I ask how you came to sleep in that position? For a while I slept on the floor but would be rolled halfway between one side and my stomach, and have the lower arm below my head. It's hard for me to picture sleeping as you do!
I don't know how I do it; I just do. It feels comfortable to me. I've been sleeping this way for decades.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 08-12-2011, 10:47 AM
JBDivmstr JBDivmstr is offline
Member
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Glad to hear that you're procedure went well and wasn't as invasive and debilitating as you had first anticipated. Wishing you a speedy recovery!
__________________
"Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut." Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961)
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 08-12-2011, 09:27 PM
Scubaqueen Scubaqueen is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBDivmstr View Post
Glad to hear that you're procedure went well and wasn't as invasive and debilitating as you had first anticipated. Wishing you a speedy recovery!
absolutely!!!
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 08-13-2011, 03:52 PM
Lust4Life Lust4Life is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
If you haven't got one already its a matter of urgency that you get a girlfriend.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 08-31-2011, 06:28 PM
DNZZ DNZZ is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Adapting to sling

The trick to comfort in an arm sling is to have the adjustment just right. Also forget the hassle of feeding the arm through the sleeve of your outer clothing. It is easier and much more comfortable with the arm under the outer clothing. You can pin the loose sleeve into the pocket or turn it inside out. It seems to take a couple of weeks to totally adapt and appreciate the comfort of the sling makes up for the inconvenience. The greatest irritation when out is clerks who drop the change on the counter for you to pick up with one hand or who fail to hold the credit card slip while you sign it.

As you are able to mobilize the arm gradually increase the time out of the sling at first removing the sling wen you are at home only.

If you are in a position to practice before the sling is mandatory, a week or so should be adequate
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.