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View Poll Results: Does your GAS Stove work when the electricity is out?
yes 100 85.47%
no 2 1.71%
don't know 11 9.40%
Other - you forgot 4 3.42%
Voters: 117. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old 08-23-2011, 04:27 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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Does your G A S Stove work when the electricity is out?

My old electric stove is nearly at the end of it's life. I already have a capped gas line ready to use.

The old gas stoves could be lit with a match during power outages. Friends warned me some new gas stoves won't work without electricity.

Is that really true? My main reason for switching to gas is because they aren't effected by power outages. I'm tired of dragging out my coleman camp stove every time an ice storm knocks out my power.

Can I still buy a nice gas stove that can be lit with a match in a power outage?

Last edited by aceplace57; 08-23-2011 at 04:29 PM..
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  #2  
Old 08-23-2011, 04:28 PM
Joey P Joey P is offline
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Yup, just gotta light it with a match.
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  #3  
Old 08-23-2011, 04:40 PM
engineer_comp_geek engineer_comp_geek is offline
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Many gas stoves these days have electric igniters, which obviously won't work if the electricity goes out. You can light the stove-top burners with a match easily enough, but lighting the oven is a different story. On many, getting to the igniter in the oven isn't all that easy, and then the oven flame will go out as soon as the oven reaches its operating temperature (it's expecting to cycle on and off to maintain temperature) so you have to either constantly re-light it (a pain) or crank the temperature up to full and run it with effectively no temperature regulation, which is horrible for cooking.

You can still buy gas stoves that use an old fashioned pilot light. They have the advantage of still working when the power goes out, and the disadvantage of wasting gas to keep the pilots going.
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  #4  
Old 08-23-2011, 04:59 PM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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We bought a new range two years ago. The burners have electric ignition, but can be lit with a match / lighter if the ignitor isn't functioning (as the switches for the gas feed to the burners are still physical / mechanical).

The oven, on the other hand, is completely electronically controlled, and dead in the water with no electricity.
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  #5  
Old 08-23-2011, 05:14 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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I just realized that I don't have a 120V plug behind my electric stove. The capped gas line hasn't been used since the 1960's. Gas stoves didn't need electricity then.

I could plug into the receptacle behind the fridge if the stoves cord is long enough.

I'd really prefer a traditional stove with pilot light. But the new ones I've seen are very basic, cheap models. I want a self cleaning oven. No way would I do without that.
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  #6  
Old 08-23-2011, 05:23 PM
longPath longPath is offline
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We installed a propane range and fireplace early in 2003, shortly before Hurricane Juan struck that September. We were without mains power for 8 days and very grateful that we didn't have to fire up the old Coleman stove out on the deck.
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  #7  
Old 08-23-2011, 05:59 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Yup, got a gas stove with match-lightable burners, but I have no idea if I could light the oven with a match or no.
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  #8  
Old 08-23-2011, 07:08 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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My gas stove is four years old - you can light the stove, but not the oven.
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  #9  
Old 08-23-2011, 07:15 PM
Sudden Kestrel Sudden Kestrel is offline
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I have a dual-fuel stove, so gas burners and electric ovens. If the power is off we would have to light it with a match and forgo any baking, but we would have turned our generator on long before resorting to that.
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  #10  
Old 08-23-2011, 07:57 PM
minionkat minionkat is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zsofia View Post
My gas stove is four years old - you can light the stove, but not the oven.
Same for me. Now that I live in the city, I almost never lose power and have only had to do it once or twice.
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  #11  
Old 08-23-2011, 08:12 PM
Rachellelogram Rachellelogram is offline
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There's a combo unit in my place currently. Can't bake stuff in the oven, which is electric, but the stovetop is functional as long as you light it with a lighter (the clicky-flint is electric). It worked in the recent power outages we've had, thankfully, along with the gas water heater.
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  #12  
Old 08-23-2011, 10:05 PM
dangermom dangermom is offline
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Sure, I just need a match. I wouldn't try it with the oven though.
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  #13  
Old 08-23-2011, 10:18 PM
Full Metal Lotus Full Metal Lotus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
I just realized that I don't have a 120V plug behind my electric stove. The capped gas line hasn't been used since the 1960's. Gas stoves didn't need electricity then.

I could plug into the receptacle behind the fridge if the stoves cord is long enough.

I'd really prefer a traditional stove with pilot light. But the new ones I've seen are very basic, cheap models. I want a self cleaning oven. No way would I do without that.

Obviously, there is a 220 hook up for your old electric range. An adaptor that converts this to a 120 plug is available for $12 or so at most appliance stores
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  #14  
Old 08-23-2011, 10:24 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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The Gas Bastards don't want to run a line down this street (which has a main at each end), so I'm stuck with electric unless I want to pipe in the propane (which is expensive).

This is my gas stove. Actually, I have at least nine of them. It can be lit with a match.
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  #15  
Old 08-23-2011, 10:38 PM
ZenBeam ZenBeam is offline
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I was wondering how much energy a gas range would take, and if you could run one off a UPS. Apparently those electronic ignition systems use a glow bar that takes around 300 watts.

These ovens, however use electric spark ignition, and might use a lot less electricity. (I found that page through here, where there are some useful comments.) Also, the Manual (PDF) includes instructions for using both the stove and oven in a power outage. It says
Quote:
The surface and oven burners in use when an electrical power failure occurs will continue to operate normally until shut off.
So that's not too bad. Even if using the oven were out, being able to cook on the stove top still leaves a lot of options.

ETA: Unfortunately, none of them seem to have self cleaning.

Last edited by ZenBeam; 08-23-2011 at 10:42 PM..
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  #16  
Old 08-23-2011, 11:28 PM
gotpasswords gotpasswords is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenBeam
I was wondering how much energy a gas range would take, and if you could run one off a UPS. Apparently those electronic ignition systems use a glow bar that takes around 300 watts.
The load would not be a problem. What is a problem is the UPS runtime. Even at minimal load, all UPS units have a finite runtime, and for most consumer-grade units, you're looking at 15-60 minutes.

Enough to keep the oven running long enough to bake some brownies, perhaps.
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  #17  
Old 08-24-2011, 05:34 AM
CrazyCatLady CrazyCatLady is offline
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Your friends are just too dumb to light the thing with a match. As everyone else has said, the strikers are electric, so if you don't have a match/lighter on hand you're fucked when the lights go out.

Which is exactly the situation we found ourselves in the first time we lost power in our first house, during an ice storm. Neither of us smoked and I was used to lighting candles on the pilot light, so I had honestly never thought about it. Luckily, we were only a 10 minute walk from a convenience store.
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  #18  
Old 08-24-2011, 06:15 AM
ecseas ecseas is offline
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I have a gas stove. It's possible to light both the stove top and the oven, but the oven is much harder. It's not impossible, but the place where you have to put the match is at the back, so you have to sit on the floor and lean your arm in.
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  #19  
Old 08-24-2011, 08:45 AM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
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I feel bad saying, "well, duh, it's a valve that you the user provide the energy for opening," but on the other hand, I recognize that lots of people don't realize that gas can be ignited via a source of ignition. You know, the "inflammable means flammable?"-crowd.

On a serious note (i.e., the above is humor, not snark), gas is superior or cooking. That's only my opinion, but it's shared by a lot of people. You won't regret the change.
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  #20  
Old 08-24-2011, 09:29 AM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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Thanks everyone.

I was worried these newer stoves had electronic gas valves that needed electricity to open/close. I looked at a few at home depot and the tags don't mention using them without power.

Glad that's not the case. I can live without an oven during a power outage. At least with working burners it's possible to cook.

Last edited by aceplace57; 08-24-2011 at 09:32 AM..
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  #21  
Old 08-24-2011, 09:34 AM
tdn tdn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by engineer_comp_geek View Post
Many gas stoves these days have electric igniters, which obviously won't work if the electricity goes out.
Mine does. But maybe it's not an electric igniter. When I turn the gas up to high, there's a clicking noise and the thing lights. When my electricity goes out, it still works.

It's a Magic Chef, FWIW.
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  #22  
Old 08-24-2011, 09:39 AM
sandra_nz sandra_nz is offline
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When we were visiting the in-laws in New Zealand in May, the power went out at their house. We were unable to light the gas stove with a match - something was preventing the gas from getting through.
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  #23  
Old 07-24-2013, 12:45 AM
John Hatfield John Hatfield is offline
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I have a 6 burner gas range, which is pretty nice, but not super high end.
It is the Kenmore Elite brand, about 4 or 5 years old.

It has an electric igniter which makes that snapping sound when you turn the dial to "Light".

Just like user "TDN" stated, it ignites even when there's a power outage.

I'm posting because I was wondering if anyone knew how that technology works?

Is there a battery backup or something?

I would love to know the answer.

Thanks very much.

-John
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  #24  
Old 07-24-2013, 12:51 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Hatfield View Post
I have a 6 burner gas range, which is pretty nice, but not super high end.
It is the Kenmore Elite brand, about 4 or 5 years old.

It has an electric igniter which makes that snapping sound when you turn the dial to "Light".

Just like user "TDN" stated, it ignites even when there's a power outage.

I'm posting because I was wondering if anyone knew how that technology works?

Is there a battery backup or something?

I would love to know the answer.

Thanks very much.

-John
Piezo-electric igniter. Just like the outdoor grill lighters and some cigarette lighters. The snapping you hear is the element striking a hard surface causing it to generate a spark.
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  #25  
Old 07-24-2013, 01:14 AM
kjbrasda kjbrasda is offline
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related:
My husband once told me he wanted to change out our electric water heater for a gas one so we'd still have hot water during a power outage. I told him he's an idiot >_<.
(The water pump on our well would obviously not run during a power outage, therefore no running water anyway)
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  #26  
Old 07-24-2013, 01:25 AM
GameHat GameHat is offline
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My gas range has piezo igniters, but more than once I have fouled one of the burners and the piezo went out. No big deal, the gas still flows, it just takes a kitchen match to light it.
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  #27  
Old 07-24-2013, 04:37 AM
Girl From Mars Girl From Mars is offline
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We have a 5-6 yr old Smeg 5 burner. In the recent Hipstergeddon here in Melbourne the piezo ignition didn't work, but lit easily with a match.
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  #28  
Old 07-24-2013, 08:40 AM
Draelin Draelin is offline
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My gas stove is probably close to 30 years old, makes the clicky sound when you turn the knob, etc. We would never have survived the week after Hurricane Sandy if it hadn't worked--it was the only thing in the damn house we could still use. I don't know about the oven because I didn't want to die in a bizarre gas explosion thanks to my own stupidity, but we did have to ignite the burners manually.
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  #29  
Old 07-24-2013, 11:09 AM
Bam Boo Gut Bam Boo Gut is offline
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I keep a disposable lighter by my stove, one that's run out of gas but the spark works just fine. It's got a plug for electric ignition but I've not plugged it in - don't have an outlet there.

We get power outages due to storms, so there are few people here with electric stoves - plus they're much more expensive and you can't adjust the heat so quickly.

What I have now is just the stove top, but when I had one with an oven I disabled the pilot - it burns gas and makes the place hot. I'd light it with a long strip of rolled newspaper, but wouldn't encourage anyone else to do that.

Last edited by Bam Boo Gut; 07-24-2013 at 11:10 AM..
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  #30  
Old 07-24-2013, 11:55 AM
aruvqan aruvqan is offline
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About 10 or so years back I bought the bottom of the line gas stove in the apartment size for our Pennsic camp, and it actually has a battery to operate the piezio crystal clicker thingy that makes the spark.

[yes, we sort of glamp Pennsic, I also have a small propane only chest freezer. I wish I didn't have to miss this year. In the picture on the left, see the lake? See the little peninsula sticking into the lake with white tents on it? Our camp in in the trees on the mainland more or less right about where the white tents end on the right end of the peninsula.]
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  #31  
Old 07-24-2013, 04:33 PM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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My electricity went off when I had a full cast on my arm, and I still managed to light the burners with a match.

When the nice man came out to fix our wires after hurricane Sandy, I mentioned how glad I was to have a gas stove that I could light with a match. Another woman standing there said in absolute amazement "You can do that?" She had never been told you could.
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  #32  
Old 07-24-2013, 07:41 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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We haven't had a gas stove for years, but the ones we did have didn't even have a plug, but had pilot lights. The power went out plenty during thunderstorms in Louisiana, and we never had a problem.
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  #33  
Old 07-24-2013, 09:01 PM
friedo friedo is offline
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Pro-tip: use a long fireplace match to light your gas stove, unless you don't care about the hair on your knuckles.
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  #34  
Old 07-24-2013, 09:08 PM
Seanette Seanette is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
My old electric stove is nearly at the end of it's life. I already have a capped gas line ready to use.

The old gas stoves could be lit with a match during power outages. Friends warned me some new gas stoves won't work without electricity.

Is that really true? My main reason for switching to gas is because they aren't effected by power outages. I'm tired of dragging out my coleman camp stove every time an ice storm knocks out my power.

Can I still buy a nice gas stove that can be lit with a match in a power outage?
I'm not that experienced with gas stoves, so asked my husband. He thinks that ones that use pilot lights and do not have electronic controls should be fine in a power outage. Electric igniters, of course, wouldn't work, but a match still could.
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