The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > General Questions

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-02-2011, 09:27 AM
drewtwo99 drewtwo99 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 8,553
Seeing Two Different Shades of Color Out of Each Eye

Hi guys, I have noticed sometimes that I see two slightly different shades of colors out of one eye when I close the other. It's easiest to perceive if I am looking at something that is a soft white. When I close my right eye, the white has a slightly blueish tint to it, when I close my left eye, the white will have a slightly reddish tint.

Is there a name for this? Is this normal, am I insane, or do I have some special kind of vision? It's been like this ever since I was a kid, and it still continues to this day.


***********************
NOTE: Please note that this thread was started in 11/2011 through 1/2012, revived in post #38 on 3/2013, and revived again in post #44 on 2/2014. If you're replying to some of the older posts, just be aware. It's being re-re-revived now because it's been taken on by Cecil as a column for 30 May 2014, and I'm directed further posts to the newer thread: http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...1#post17418376
Congrats, drewtwo99! -- CKDH

Last edited by C K Dexter Haven; 05-30-2014 at 05:52 AM..
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 11-02-2011, 09:35 AM
Dorjän Dorjän is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by drewtwo99 View Post
Hi guys, I have noticed sometimes that I see two slightly different shades of colors out of one eye when I close the other. It's easiest to perceive if I am looking at something that is a soft white. When I close my right eye, the white has a slightly blueish tint to it, when I close my left eye, the white will have a slightly reddish tint.

Is there a name for this? Is this normal, am I insane, or do I have some special kind of vision? It's been like this ever since I was a kid, and it still continues to this day.
If you are insane, then you have company. My vision is exactly the same. Right eye has a slightly reddish hue, left eye slightly blueish. I suspect this is perfectly normal.
  #3  
Old 11-02-2011, 09:38 AM
panache45 panache45 is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
Posts: 22,539
I'm an artist who works with color all the time, and this phenomenon is exactly the same with me. Left is bluer, right is redder.
  #4  
Old 11-02-2011, 09:38 AM
FlyingDragonFan FlyingDragonFan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
I have the same issue, in a different way, but I know what it is. My right eye has a mild cataract that's discolored, giving that eye's vision a yellowish tint.
  #5  
Old 11-02-2011, 06:33 PM
Engywook Engywook is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Well, when shooting a video with multiple cameras, there is a prep procedure called white balancing. Just like it sounds, the two cameras are adjusted so a plain white surface looks exactly the same to both cameras. If you don't do this, there are noticeable, even jarring differences between the two.

Haven't thought of out this way before, but perhaps the two eyes aren't perfectly white balanced?
  #6  
Old 11-02-2011, 07:28 PM
campp campp is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Engywook View Post
Haven't thought of out this way before, but perhaps the two eyes aren't perfectly white balanced?
Umm, so where's the adjustment knob?
  #7  
Old 11-02-2011, 07:34 PM
activgurl activgurl is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
How common IS this, anyway? I've never mentioned it to anyone, because I figured they wouldn't believe it. I notice it on the highway mostly. Pink tones from one eye, grey tones from the other. Weird.
  #8  
Old 11-02-2011, 08:57 PM
tanstaafl tanstaafl is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: ATL
Posts: 3,107
I have this too. I'm also slightly colorblind and I had always assumed that one eye was simply "more colorblind" than the other. I have no idea if that makes any kind of sense though.
  #9  
Old 11-02-2011, 09:02 PM
antechinus antechinus is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
You can duplicate this effect by lying on your side for a few minutes and looking at a white field*.

From memory, the eye closest the ground sees a red hue. Maybe blood pressure differential causes the effect.

Does this work for anyone else or is just me?




* like a white wall or piece of paper, not a paddock
  #10  
Old 11-03-2011, 01:18 AM
BigT BigT is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
I do it, too, but it's not all the time. I think it's just the random assortment of rods in your eye. Your brain normally compensates, but occasionally you catch it.
  #11  
Old 11-03-2011, 11:46 AM
redtail23 redtail23 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 2,926
Whoa, weird! I'd never noticed this before, but y'all are right. Left eye slightly bluish, right eye slightly reddish.
  #12  
Old 11-03-2011, 12:08 PM
Bytegeist Bytegeist is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigT View Post
I think it's just the random assortment of rods in your eye. Your brain normally compensates, but occasionally you catch it.
Nitpick: It's the cones on your retina that detect color, not the rods.
  #13  
Old 11-03-2011, 12:09 PM
cmyk cmyk is offline
4 out of 5 Jesuses agree!
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Detroit Yankee in Memphis
Posts: 11,224
One thing to be aware of is the nature of how your rods and cones are stimulated. If one of your eyes is exposed to lighting or a color a bit more than the other, there'll be a slightly noticeable distinction between the "tinting" between eyes. If it's merely a case of overstimulation and persistence of vision, then over a few minutes, your eyes will equalize.

Ever put on those red/blue anaglyph 3D glasses? If you haven't noticed before, after wearing them for a bit, take them off. Now close one of your eyes. If that eye was looking through the blue lens, everything should appear quite a bit more "reddish". And the opposite for the other eye; the eye looking through the red lens will see everything a bit more "bluish".

That said, my eyes appear to be equal in "white balance". But due to all sorts of variables between your corneas, retinas, nerves and brain, I'm not surprised there might be a common condition that would create a slight imbalance between the paired eyes.

Last edited by cmyk; 11-03-2011 at 12:11 PM..
  #14  
Old 11-03-2011, 12:31 PM
Oukile Oukile is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by antechinus View Post
You can duplicate this effect by lying on your side for a few minutes and looking at a white field*.

From memory, the eye closest the ground sees a red hue. Maybe blood pressure differential causes the effect.

Does this work for anyone else or is just me?
Yes, me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by campp View Post
Umm, so where's the adjustment knob?
Somewhere in the occipital cortex, I presume.
  #15  
Old 11-03-2011, 01:29 PM
njtt njtt is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
I experience this too, and I think we have had a thread or threads on it before. It seems to be common, or possibly even universal.

It may be to do with cone distribution. The proportions of red-sensitive to green-sensitive cones in the eye vary a lot from person to person,* and, within the foveal area of the retina, where they are found, the red and green cones are distributed in a very irregular way, seemingly at random but with a fair bit of clumping together of the same types. (The blue-sensitive cones, which are controlled by a different gene on a different chromosome, are distributed much more regularly). I am not aware of any studies on differences of cone proportions between the two eyes of the same person, but, given how random the distribution seems to be within a single eye, it does not seem too unlikely that the proportions of red and green cones might vary between the eyes of a single person.

Whether this would actually produce this effect is another matter, but maybe it would.

The other possibility is that the effect is caused by differences (impurities, or whatever) in the transparent parts of each eye: the vitreous or aqueous humor, and/or the lens or cornea.

¬¬¬¬¬¬

*This has nothing to do with color blindness, which is caused by cones that do not work properly, As long as the cones are all working as they should, just because you have, say, more red cones and fewer green ones than the next guy, it does not follow that your ability to discriminate colors will differ measurably from his.
  #16  
Old 11-03-2011, 02:34 PM
Toucanna Toucanna is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2011
+1

The last time I got glasses, I mentioned this to the optometrist. He said it was no big deal, but didn't explain why it happened or what may have caused it. So, I appreciate the explanations posted here.
  #17  
Old 11-03-2011, 04:31 PM
Kenm Kenm is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
I remember seeing on a TV morning show a couple of years ago a teenager who the story alleged saw true colours for the first time by wearing glasses with different-coloured lenses.

I found these links, among a bunch of others I didn't read, using this search on Scroogle:

"color blind" OR "colour blind" AND glasses

Colour-correcting lenses.

As an aside, this sentence in a Daily Mail story about colour-correcting lenses was a surprise:
Quote:
While they may not make any difference to my flying aspirations, she says children with dyslexia or similar reading problems have benefited massively from wearing coloured contact lenses.
  #18  
Old 11-04-2011, 12:25 AM
stewartlaura67 stewartlaura67 is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 1
Ohh! So many of us are having the same problem. But I have never heard of it before. Is that harmful in any ways? Except from professional purpose, has anyone faced any problem due to this in day to day activities? I am curious to know!
  #19  
Old 11-04-2011, 12:34 AM
Joey P Joey P is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 21,055
Another one chiming in with my right eye being slightly redder. I noticed this when I was probably 10 years old or so.
I've found the easiest way to demonstrate it to myself it to put my palm or fist between my eyes (against my nose), and then move my entire head back and forth while looking at something white. This way you can see the difference as you transition from one eye to the other instead of having to refocus if you trying to do it by closing one eye and opening the other.
  #20  
Old 11-04-2011, 01:25 AM
njtt njtt is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by stewartlaura67 View Post
Ohh! So many of us are having the same problem. But I have never heard of it before. Is that harmful in any ways? Except from professional purpose, has anyone faced any problem due to this in day to day activities? I am curious to know!
I do not see any reason to think it would be harmful at all, even for "professional" purposes. (What professional purposes are you thinking of?) It is not like color blindness: it does not stop you from being able to distinguish colors perfectly well.

Frankly, I would not be surprised if it turned out that everybody would find that they experience this to some degree, if they really pay attention to the issue.

Last edited by njtt; 11-04-2011 at 01:26 AM..
  #21  
Old 11-04-2011, 10:18 AM
Chessic Sense Chessic Sense is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
I bet it's just retinal fatigue from uneven lighting. When driving down the highway, one eye is next to a window and the other is inside the darker car. That's enough to fatigue one eye more than the other.

FWIW, I'm lit from the left right now and my "tint" is the opposite of everyone else's for now.
  #22  
Old 11-04-2011, 10:24 AM
njtt njtt is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
I don't think so. I am pretty sure it has always been consistent for me which eye is redder and which is greener.
  #23  
Old 01-26-2012, 10:21 PM
drewtwo99 drewtwo99 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 8,553
Still no word on whether or not this has an actual name (if any)?
  #24  
Old 01-27-2012, 05:22 AM
AaronX AaronX is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Hey I was just thinking of this today.
  #25  
Old 01-27-2012, 05:27 AM
AaronX AaronX is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Seeing how well our brain compensates - like if you wear glasses that make things upside down, you eventually see things correctly - I think any color differences due to corneas, glasses etc would be quickly corrected. I believe there's an advantage to seeing things like this and the brain does it on purpose.
  #26  
Old 01-27-2012, 05:59 AM
njtt njtt is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronX View Post
Seeing how well our brain compensates - like if you wear glasses that make things upside down, you eventually see things correctly . . . .
You don't. It is a myth based on early 20th century, poorly controlled experiments. As I have previously detailed on these boards, more modern experiments have shown that wht you see does not "return to normal". You learn to cope, that is all.
  #27  
Old 01-27-2012, 07:47 AM
Hermitian Hermitian is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by njtt View Post
I experience this too, and I think we have had a thread or threads on it before. It seems to be common, or possibly even universal.
Well, I can tell you it isn't universal. I have no such strangnesses. All you wackos must be smokin' the cheap stuff!
  #28  
Old 01-27-2012, 08:46 AM
Joey P Joey P is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 21,055
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermitian View Post
Well, I can tell you it isn't universal. I have no such strangnesses. All you wackos must be smokin' the cheap stuff!
You mean the good stuff. The cheap stuff doesn't make you see different colors out of each eye.
  #29  
Old 01-27-2012, 10:52 AM
Deegeea Deegeea is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
You know how you can look at those special pictures of two faces/a goblet and see it either way, letting it flip back and forth? When I was a pre-teen, I could do that with right side up and up side down. Basically I could flip my field of vision so it seemed right side up or up side down. I used to read books upside down using this facility, to start conversations... I can't seem to do it anymore but probably with enough effort I could re-figure out how I did it.
  #30  
Old 01-27-2012, 08:35 PM
AaronX AaronX is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by njtt View Post
You don't. It is a myth based on early 20th century, poorly controlled experiments. As I have previously detailed on these boards, more modern experiments have shown that wht you see does not "return to normal". You learn to cope, that is all.
People have learnt to "see" with electrode arrays on their tongue or back. No matter what you call it, the brain can compensate for a wide variety of inputs.
  #31  
Old 01-28-2012, 01:38 PM
Lok Lok is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Northwest Ohio, USA
Posts: 2,526
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deegeea View Post
You know how you can look at those special pictures of two faces/a goblet and see it either way, letting it flip back and forth? When I was a pre-teen, I could do that with right side up and up side down. Basically I could flip my field of vision so it seemed right side up or up side down. I used to read books upside down using this facility, to start conversations... I can't seem to do it anymore but probably with enough effort I could re-figure out how I did it.
A woman I used to work with was a leftie when she was born. But she also had a problem with stuttering, and they forced her to learn to be right handed. She was cured of the stuttering, and ever since, she has been able to write with either hand, backwards or forwards. She can stand at a chalkboard and write a sentence backward with one hand at the same time she writes is forward with the other, then reverse it and go the other way. And by backward, I don't just mean from the end to the beginning, I mean mirrored also. It hurt my brain just watching her do it.
__________________
Lok
----------------
"I am madly in love with Lok and wish to have his beautiful children. I also wish to leave my entire (quite subsantial) estate to him when I die, which might now be quite suddenly." - auRa
  #32  
Old 01-28-2012, 02:09 PM
njtt njtt is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronX View Post
People have learnt to "see" with electrode arrays on their tongue or back. No matter what you call it, the brain can compensate for a wide variety of inputs.
What is your point? As I said, people wearing inverting lenses learn to cope. However, it is a myth (promulgated by the earlier papers on the phenomenon) that their visual world flips back over to seem upright again. Here is a cite for you [PDF].

Likewise, although people who get skilled at using a Tactile Visual Substitution system (the electrode arrays - actually more often vibrator arrays - that you are talking about) may well agree that the experience of using it is more like seeing than feeling, it is still very different from seeing with your eyes.
  #33  
Old 01-29-2012, 05:21 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Slithering on the hull
Posts: 22,233
Cataracts are the most common cause for this phenomen, folks. It's not at all unusual to have cataracts develop at different rates between the two eyes, and cataracts significantly change one's color perception.
  #34  
Old 01-29-2012, 05:31 PM
ultrafilter ultrafilter is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
Cataracts are the most common cause for this phenomen, folks. It's not at all unusual to have cataracts develop at different rates between the two eyes, and cataracts significantly change one's color perception.
I experienced this in high school, with better than average vision, so I doubt it was cataracts in my case.
  #35  
Old 01-29-2012, 10:14 PM
AaronX AaronX is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by njtt View Post
What is your point? As I said, people wearing inverting lenses learn to cope. However, it is a myth (promulgated by the earlier papers on the phenomenon) that their visual world flips back over to seem upright again. Here is a cite for you [PDF].

Likewise, although people who get skilled at using a Tactile Visual Substitution system (the electrode arrays - actually more often vibrator arrays - that you are talking about) may well agree that the experience of using it is more like seeing than feeling, it is still very different from seeing with your eyes.
My point is, the brain constantly calibrates input against expectations, so any differences that remain are probably intentional. You don't feel things are lighter when using your dominant hand. Sounds from a centrally located source appear equally loud. Even touching your nose with your fingers seems simultaneous, despite both signals having different path lengths.

Maybe someone can calibrate a 3D monitor so both eyes see the same color, then watch a movie or something. I believe the difference will return.
  #36  
Old 01-29-2012, 10:37 PM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Montréal, Québec
Posts: 8,772
Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
Cataracts are the most common cause for this phenomen, folks. It's not at all unusual to have cataracts develop at different rates between the two eyes, and cataracts significantly change one's color perception.
Like ultrafilter, I noticed this back in high school, if not earlier - more than 15 years ago, I'd say. I'd hate to think that the half dozen optometrists and eye exams I've had for both standard checkups/new glasses and for work-related purposes (pre-employment screening) in that time failed to detect any developing cataracts!

I'm not always aware of it, and just last night I had one eye covered for a few minutes (just randomly positioning myself like that in bed) and when I lifted my head to turn out the light the effect was very noticeable. Right now, I can't even tell for sure if this effect is occurring.

I think it might be caused by lighting conditions/light orientation/eye fatigue, rather than being a chronic thing.



Perhaps entirely unrelated, but last night, just a few minutes later, I also experienced a "head explosion". I can't say I've ever noticed a correlation between the two, but I figured if we are talking about sensory/brain weirdnesses, I might as well provide full disclosure.

The explosion was like a doorbell ringing. It's more often a door slam.
  #37  
Old 01-31-2012, 11:28 PM
BigT BigT is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
Cataracts are the most common cause for this phenomen, folks. It's not at all unusual to have cataracts develop at different rates between the two eyes, and cataracts significantly change one's color perception.
The OP says "slightly", and it's something we've all noticed happening, so it doesn't sound like a good diagnostic criteria for that condition.
  #38  
Old 03-27-2013, 05:27 PM
Nick34722 Nick34722 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Nick34722's Response

I also have this pheunomenon. My left eye sees a blueish tint when my right eye is closed and my right eye has a reddish orangish tint when I close my left eye. If I have both eyes open it makes no difference. I see this any time I close one eye, but I have found out that it is really distinct when I look at dead grass or there's a sunset. I finally found out other people see this too.
  #39  
Old 03-28-2013, 08:50 AM
Hermitian Hermitian is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
I was going to post that all these "me too" people are a bunch of mis-calibrated defective units and should be sent back to the people factory.

I then saw that I already derided them over a year ago, so nevermind.
  #40  
Old 03-28-2013, 08:55 AM
california jobcase california jobcase is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
I noticed this way back in my 20s while teaching biology. Through a microscope, my right eye was better at seeing detail, but the left eye saw more vibrant color.
  #41  
Old 03-28-2013, 09:27 PM
sidhechaos sidhechaos is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lok View Post
A woman I used to work with was a leftie when she was born. But she also had a problem with stuttering, and they forced her to learn to be right handed. She was cured of the stuttering, and ever since, she has been able to write with either hand, backwards or forwards. She can stand at a chalkboard and write a sentence backward with one hand at the same time she writes is forward with the other, then reverse it and go the other way. And by backward, I don't just mean from the end to the beginning, I mean mirrored also. It hurt my brain just watching her do it.
I didn't stuffer but I had a psychobat ex nun teaching in a public school who thought all lefties were the devil and would strike me with a ruler. She drew blood one day and I lost my temper and grabbed the ruler and smacked her face, she took me to the principal which was a mistake.....the principal was a leftie Ms psychobat mysteriously went on leave at the end of the week and never returned. (good riddance) Because of that I can write left or right handed, left handed I often write things from right to left (in other words mirror writing) and with concentration, I can write with both hands, backwards with the left and forwards with the right simultaniously. My handwriting however is hideous unless I really focus and go slow because with all the switching around my motor control got iffy. ( I was both read and writing before I even attended grade school, so being forced to change something that fundamentally developed created some problems for me)
  #42  
Old 03-28-2013, 09:31 PM
sidhechaos sidhechaos is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
I'm on a medication called hydrochloroquinine (for arthritis fibro and it's sometimes used to treat lupus) and a side effect is it can re-align the rods an cones in your eyes and alter your color perception.

If you are very myopic you may have that reddish tint because the retina's are so thin they are being tinted by reflection from capillaries in the eyes.

Heres a question for you. If you lay on your back and close your eyes do you see a very vague movement that looks a bit like a galaxy spinning counterclockwise against your eyelids?
  #43  
Old 03-28-2013, 09:48 PM
Lok Lok is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Northwest Ohio, USA
Posts: 2,526
She wasn't slow at all. She could just write stuff out anyway she wanted with either hand. It was really freaky watching her. But she had a freaky brain in other ways. She has MS and her doctors couldn't figure out why she was still able to walk. Her brain had deteriorated far beyond what most people could handle. That was when I still worked there. I left that job 6 years ago and my sister ran into her there, still working.
  #44  
Old 02-18-2014, 06:00 AM
Firefly640 Firefly640 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
O.o

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorjän View Post
If you are insane, then you have company. My vision is exactly the same. Right eye has a slightly reddish hue, left eye slightly blueish. I suspect this is perfectly normal.
I actually have the opposite I see bluish out of my right eye and reddish out of my left eye.
  #45  
Old 02-18-2014, 06:03 AM
Firefly640 Firefly640 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by antechinus View Post
You can duplicate this effect by lying on your side for a few minutes and looking at a white field*.

From memory, the eye closest the ground sees a red hue. Maybe blood pressure differential causes the effect.

Does this work for anyone else or is just me?




* like a white wall or piece of paper, not a paddock
Do you think it depends on how good your vision is?
  #46  
Old 02-18-2014, 08:28 AM
AaronX AaronX is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
My working theory now is: LCDs. We stare at them all the time, and most LCDs change colour with viewing angle. Might have something to do with polarisation as well. Each eye sees a different colour, when they see the same colour they get confused.
  #47  
Old 02-18-2014, 10:05 AM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Texas, USA
Posts: 7,694
Multi Zombie!!!

(11/11 -> 1/12)
(1/12 -> 3/13)
(3/13 -> 2/14)
  #48  
Old 02-18-2014, 12:32 PM
Kenm Kenm is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
Multi Zombie!!!

(11/11 -> 1/12)
(1/12 -> 3/13)
(3/13 -> 2/14)
Let's keep it going until 20/20.
  #49  
Old 02-19-2014, 06:42 AM
tanstaafl tanstaafl is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: ATL
Posts: 3,107
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronX View Post
My working theory now is: LCDs. We stare at them all the time, and most LCDs change colour with viewing angle. Might have something to do with polarisation as well. Each eye sees a different colour, when they see the same colour they get confused.
I first noticed it in myself when in college in the 1970s. I'm pretty sure I wasn't looking at LCD screens then.
  #50  
Old 02-19-2014, 02:55 PM
Disposable Hero Disposable Hero is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Haven't read this entire thread yet but I get this as well, I thought it is perhaps the minds way of determining true colour by balancing different inputs from each eye in the same way two eyes are necessary to determine depth perception?
Closed Thread

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright © 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.