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Old 07-31-2012, 02:52 PM
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Whatcha Readin' August 2012 Edition


Dog days of summer are here. That means fall is around the corner!

Still in the middle of The Clockwork Vampire Chronicles. Still enjoying it. It is definitely an homage to Gemmell's Legend.

July's thread.

Last edited by Khadaji; 07-31-2012 at 02:52 PM.
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Old 07-31-2012, 11:26 PM
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Been reading the Voyages of the Chathrand series by Redick. Pretty good, although the large cast of characters and location names is quite formidable at first. Once you get past that, the rest of the series becomes a pretty good read.
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Old 08-01-2012, 09:40 AM
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I am reading Into the Silence by Wade Davis. Great, fascinating, huge book about Mallory, the First World War and the early attempts on Everest. Hilarious to read about Mallory's great distaste for Canadians. He could barely bring himself to speak to a Canadian. "God send me the saliva."

I am also reading The Magnificent Ambersons, by Booth Tarkington. Great novel, and one I have too long put off reading.
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Old 08-01-2012, 09:43 AM
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Season of the Witch by Arni Thorarinsson. It's a mystery set in Iceland. It's okay, but ordinary, with some clumsy expository dialogue and confusing scene changes. Might be a problem with the translation.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:20 AM
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Halfway through Snow Crash. It's older but I went back for it after reading a new Stephenson novel, REAMDE. I also recommend Cryptonomicon.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:26 AM
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I'm about 100 pages into The Hobbit, which I think I read when I was a kid. I'll go ahead and admit that I'm somewhat underwhelmed thus far. Is LOTR written with a similar narrative voice?
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:34 AM
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I'm about a quarter of the way through Cloud Atlas. It's a book I would never read myself, but my friend raved about it over and over, so I'm pushing my way through it. I'm liking it so far. It's...different.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:36 AM
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I'm about 100 pages into The Hobbit, which I think I read when I was a kid. I'll go ahead and admit that I'm somewhat underwhelmed thus far. Is LOTR written with a similar narrative voice?
I'm not a huge fan of The Hobbit, though I don't specifically remember the narrative voice. LOTR is more serious, and written more for adults, if that helps.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:40 AM
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Read Mightier Than the Sword: Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Battle for America, which was AWESOME. And quite a page-turner, which I wasn't expecting for a non-fiction book about the cultural impact of Uncle Tom's Cabin. For me, the best part was that so often, these days, Uncle Tom's Cabin seems so dated ... it's like a cliche of itself. This book was a great reminder that what HBS accomplished through her novel is nothing short of amazing.

Also finished In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin by Erik Larsen, which I thought was okay. It's a fascinating topic (US Ambassador in Berlin during Hitler's early years in power), but the book uses the antics of the Ambassador's unhinged daughter to frame the story, and it's a little too all over the place for me.

Now reading Bitterblue, the second (or third, depending on how you're counting) book in a YA series. Fantasy, quasi-medieval setting, a cluster of kingdoms in which a handful of people are "graced" with unusual powers, some of them vaguely supernatural. I recommend for fans of YA.

I am trying to read Wolf Hall, but it's losing me a bit because of the shifting perspectives.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:42 AM
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Almost finished with Jennie Gerhardt, by Theodore Dreiser.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:52 AM
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I've been having a stressful week, so I'm rereading The Princess Bride as a sort of comfort blanket.

I just finished Faithful Place, the third in Tana French's Dublin Murder Squad trilogy. This one is the best of the three. In The Woods was good, but suffered from a protagonist that became quite detestable by the end of the book. The Likeness was fun, but so implausible that the genre was more fantasy then mystery. Faithful Place has the perfect blend of sympathetic characters, wrenching family drama and a realistic mystery.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:53 AM
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I just finished Faithful Place, the third in Tana French's Dublin Murder Squad trilogy. This one is the best of the three. In The Woods was good, but suffered from a protagonist that became quite detestable by the end of the book. The Likeness was fun, but so implausible that the genre was more fantasy then mystery. Faithful Place has the perfect blend of sympathetic characters, wrenching family drama and a realistic mystery.
Oooh, I just got her newest, Broken Harbor, for my birthday. I can't wait to crack it open, although I have some library books I need to get through first.
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Old 08-01-2012, 12:57 PM
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Old 08-01-2012, 01:37 PM
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I'm not a huge fan of The Hobbit, though I don't specifically remember the narrative voice. LOTR is more serious, and written more for adults, if that helps.
Ok, thanks. That's what I was wondering, if LOTR was written like a YA book. The Hobbit is reminding me a little bit of Jack Vance's The Dying Earth, which I really didn't like.
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Old 08-01-2012, 02:35 PM
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Still working on the audiobook of The Wind through the Keyhole - have finally gotten used to King's narration, tho his attempt at different voices is a bit cringe-worthy. (To be fair, I suck at voices too, but I'm not narrating a novel!) A bit surprised to still be in the story within a story within a story at about 80% complete, but whatcha gonna do?

Current Kindle read is Markus Zusak's The Book Thief which is beautiful and heartbreaking; I've highlighted a bunch of passages of evocative, lyrical phrases & I can definitely see how this has won all the awards it has. I'll probably revisit this book in audio form someday soon.

Latest library read: Battle Royale by Koushun Takami. Powerful writing & while there are definitely comparisons to The Hunger Games - Takami got there first and (dare I say?) did it better. Having most every chapter focus on a different student made the situation more visceral (so to speak) - I'll admit I had trouble keeping track of who was whom - and the foreign-to-me names may have had something to do with it. Recommended to dystopia fans who aren't afraid of a little non-gratuitous violence. I'll probably pick up an e-book version of this for myself sometime, as it clocks in at over 600 pages.
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Old 08-01-2012, 08:48 PM
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Finished Jennie Gerhardt, by Theodore Dreiser. Quite good. I believe I liked it better than Sister Carrie. When it came out in 1911, HL Mencken in a review said it was the best American novel he'd ever read after Huckleberry Finn. But I still feel it's below his big, five-star epic, An American Tragedy, which was to come out 14 years later. Dreiser said in one interview that he didn't like Jennie Gerhardt himself.

Next up in my Dreiser anthology: Twelve Men. Not a novel but rather a series of essays about men whom Dreiser knew and admired, ranging from his brother Paul to "Culhane, the Solid Man," who was a sanitorium owner and former wrestler.
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Old 08-01-2012, 09:22 PM
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Ok, thanks. That's what I was wondering, if LOTR was written like a YA book. The Hobbit is reminding me a little bit of Jack Vance's The Dying Earth, which I really didn't like.
The Hobbit was definitely written to appeal to younger readers; LOTR, not so much. I highly recommend this book, which has all kinds of great footnotes on Tolkien's various inspirations and homages, as well as art from the various editions of the book over the years. It also includes "The Quest of Erebor," which was cut from LOTR, in which Gandalf explains to his Hobbit friends (after the destruction of the One Ring) why he helped Thorin in the first place, and why he chose Bilbo to go along: http://www.amazon.com/The-Annotated-...notated+hobbit

I have about 200 pages to go in George R.R. Martin's A Dance with Dragons but have set it aside for the moment. Instead I've been enjoying Peter Hennessy's The Prime Minister, nonfiction about the top British political leaders since WWII, and how the office has changed - or hasn't - over the years. I've also been reading Robert Lawson's charming 1953 kids' book Mr. Revere and I, which is written as if told by Paul Revere's horse - a childhood favorite of mine that I'm now rereading with my two youngest kids.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:08 PM
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After years of urging by my wife, I've discovered the joy of reading P.G. Wodehouse. Just finished a bunch of Blanding Castle stories, now I'm knee deep in Jeeves & Wooster.
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:52 AM
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Re-reading, after many years, Weaveworld by Clive Barker.
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Old 08-02-2012, 01:28 AM
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After years of urging by my wife, I've discovered the joy of reading P.G. Wodehouse. Just finished a bunch of Blanding Castle stories, now I'm knee deep in Jeeves & Wooster.
Lucky bloke. I remember that wonderful feeling of 'discovering' Wodehouse.

I've just finished Michael Palin's Halfway to Hollywood and ended up re-reading Stephen Fry's Chronicles to compare the crossovers. Whipped through Goodnight Mister Tom because the kid had it for school and I wanted to see if it was as depressing as the TV adaptation (yes, sniff)

Currently juggling Ramsey Campbell's The Darkest Part of the Woods, Pratchett's Maskerade, Gaiman's The Graveyard Book and Pamela Stephenson's Billy.

There's more, but they're 'car books' that I read only if I've arrived early.
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Old 08-02-2012, 01:37 AM
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The Berlin-Baghdad Express: The Ottoman Empire and Germany's Bid for World Power by Sean McMeekin and The Taste of War: World War II and the Battle for Food by Lizzie Collingham (interesting subject I'd never encountered before: the role of food production and distribution in the second world war).

Last edited by Little Nemo; 08-02-2012 at 01:38 AM.
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Old 08-02-2012, 07:47 AM
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I finished #4 in the Laura Ingalls Wilder series, "On the Banks of Plum Creek," and started "By the Shores of Silver Lake." I love how the writing in the series gets more mature as Laura does. "Silver Lake" started out really sad and I was sobbing in the first chapter.

I'm also reading "The Terror" by Dan Simmons but am having a bit of a hard time getting into it. Has anyone else read this one? Does it get better or am I better calling it quits before I get 350 pages in and feel like I have to slog through the rest?
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Old 08-02-2012, 08:03 AM
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Oooh, I just got her newest, Broken Harbor, for my birthday. I can't wait to crack it open, although I have some library books I need to get through first.
I just finished it. You won't be disappointed. She keeps getting better.
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Old 08-02-2012, 08:48 AM
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Wow, it's August already? I missed July completely!

So, I tore through The Long Earth by Pratchett and Baxter. Really good book with an amazing number of ideas. Most of the mixed reviews I've seen were from people who didn't realize this was the beginning of a series, so not all questions were neatly wrapped up at the finish.
I also ripped through Redshirts by Scalzi. Really enjoyable quick read, with lots of questions asked and answered. I especially liked the three codas at the end.
I also read the first two books in The Expanse series by James S. A. Corey. It's been a while since I had read good, fun space opera, and this scratched that itch and much more. Can't wait for the rest of the books to come out.
Right now I have just started The Apocalypse Codex by Stross, and I've been picking at The Weird compilation by Jeff and Ann VanderMeer. It's been hit and miss, but mostly hit.
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Old 08-02-2012, 08:52 AM
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I'm also reading "The Terror" by Dan Simmons but am having a bit of a hard time getting into it. Has anyone else read this one? Does it get better or am I better calling it quits before I get 350 pages in and feel like I have to slog through the rest?
I read this one and really liked it. Found it informative and creepy. Dan Simmons tends to be a slow starter, but in The Terror things pick up action-wise in the middle. The book is pretty bleak throughout, so if it's the tone you don't like, it doesn't get any more optimistic.
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Old 08-02-2012, 08:58 AM
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I'm also reading "The Terror" by Dan Simmons but am having a bit of a hard time getting into it. Has anyone else read this one? Does it get better or am I better calling it quits before I get 350 pages in and feel like I have to slog through the rest?
I absolutely loved The Terror - it was my favorite book I read in 2011. I loved it from the first page, though, so I can't really tell you if it gets better. It does take a while before things start happening. I see on Goodreads that some people found it tedious and many thought it was too long, so you wouldn't be alone.


I'm reading John Quincy Adams: A Public Life, a Private Life, by Paul C. Nagel. So far it's good. It's focusing very tightly on his personal life, with only brief mentions of the larger events that are taking place around him. It has a very negative take on Abigail Adams, calling her "a calamity as a mother".

I've also just started The Long Ships, which is a Viking adventure novel written in the 1940's by Swedish author Frans G. Bengtsson. The introduction is by Michael Chabon, who swears that the book is really good. So far it's quite funny.
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Old 08-02-2012, 09:07 AM
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Gonzo: The Life of Hunter S Thompson. It's an oral history edited by Jann Wenner. It's easy reading, as it's snippets chopped up into short passages. I've read a lot of Thompson's stuff, and I already know much of his biography, but it's interesting getting the perspective of people who knew him best. And there aren't many punches pulled.
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Old 08-02-2012, 10:13 AM
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I am reading Into the Silence by Wade Davis. Great, fascinating, huge book about Mallory, the First World War and the early attempts on Everest. Hilarious to read about Mallory's great distaste for Canadians. He could barely bring himself to speak to a Canadian. "God send me the saliva."
Ooh - this looks like something I'll have to pick up. (I'm such a sucker for Everest tales.) Let us know how it goes.

I started (and finished) Tomorrow, When the War Began yesterday while staying home recouping from a bout of food poisoning. Kind of a post-apocalypic young adult book; several teens go camping in the bush in Australia and return to find that a non-specified enemy has invaded their country. It goes really fast, and was fun enough. I'm interested enough to possibly pick up one or two of the sequals (there's like 7 now, I think), but if I don't, I don't feel like I've missed anything.

I'm going out for lunch and have my Kindle with me, so I'll be starting something new this afternoon - looking forward to it!
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Old 08-02-2012, 10:16 AM
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Thanks, TheMerchandise and Eleanor of Aquitaine. I think I'll keep at it for a while and see how it goes. I have definitely really enjoyed parts of it but then it will drag for a few pages. I'm looking forward to when it gets really creepy.

I think I may just have a really bad case of "what's-next-itis." Sometimes I just get so wrapped up in what's next to read on my list and the excitement of starting something new that it diminishes my enjoyment of what I'm currently reading...which, of course, I had been dying to read not so long ago. I just need to relax and enjoy.
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Old 08-02-2012, 11:10 PM
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After years of urging by my wife, I've discovered the joy of reading P.G. Wodehouse. Just finished a bunch of Blanding Castle stories, now I'm knee deep in Jeeves & Wooster.
One of the things I learned from reading several bios of the Queen this year was that, when she was in her late teens, her mother gave her a summer reading list that was entirely composed of Wodehouse titles.
  #31  
Old 08-03-2012, 07:42 AM
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I finished A Dance with Dragons recently, and Ive almost finished slogging threough Jules Verne's North and South. I recommend it only to completists. Also, this free Nook Book has the worst computer-completion I've ever seen. I'm going to start a thread on it when I'm finally done.

I've started Tales of Neveryon (Samuel R. Delany autographed my copy!) and Garrett P. Serviss' Edison's Conquest of Mars, a book I've wanted to read for quite a while. The paperback edition includes the original 1989 illustrations and supporting material. This book introduced the Disintegrator, space suits, the story of Earth Guys fighting back against the invading aliens, and a host of other ideas that have become SF staples and cliches. It's not really very well written, but it bubbles with interesting ideas. A weird fossil.


I also have a stack of books I picked up to read, and now can't find.
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Old 08-03-2012, 07:59 AM
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I just finished Let's Pretend This Never Happened: (a mostly true memoir), by Jenny Lawson. Maybe itís just that I donít read many humor books, but this was so lite I found myself just skimming the last half and looking longingly at the TBR pile. However, the author is a Stephen King fan and also included pictures of her pug, so points for that.

Just started on Cleaning House: a momís 12-month experiment to rid her home of youth entitlement, by Kay Wyma. Iím already having some doubts about this one. For instance, her epiphany about how spoiled her kids are was brought on by her teenage sonís fantasizing about whether heíd rather have a Lamborghini or a Porsche. Big whoop. Also, something about the tone of the writing has me thinking sheís going to bring up religious faith soon, and when she does, Iíll be finished reading this book. *sigh* Or maybe itíll be full of great ideas for me to implement at home.
  #33  
Old 08-05-2012, 10:41 AM
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Almost done with David Guterson's novel Snow Falling on Cedars. Well-written, though slightly overdone at times, and very well told. The characters are vivid and the setting is too; I'm a sucker for books where the setting is essentially another character.

I must admit I'm almost afraid to finish it. I don't think it's going to end well. I hate unhappy endings when I've grown to care for the characters...
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Old 08-05-2012, 10:57 AM
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Season of the Witch was awful. It's in the recycling bin.

March Violets by Philip Kerr, on the other hand, is pretty awesome. Kerr is a bit too fond of metaphor when describing characters, but the metaphors are snarky fun, so that's okay. Violets is the first in his Berlin Noir trilogy, set in 1936. I'm not a historian but it seems that he's done his research. It feels pretty realistic.
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Old 08-05-2012, 11:41 AM
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The Crimson Petal And The White. I'm enjoying it.
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Old 08-05-2012, 11:51 AM
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I just finished a book called La saga de los longevos (Saga of the Long-lived Ones), a novel by Eva GarcŪa SŠenz (sort of science fiction, set in the present). As far as I can tell it's her first; it looks like she may have ideas to turn it into a series. No vampires, glowpires, werewolves, templar knights or zombies in sight, but there's a bunch of archaeologists, some Cro-magnons, some Escites, some Vikings...

I'm looking forward to any new books she publishes. Now working on Operaciůn Hagen, a novel about the German atomic program in WWII, which would be a lot more interesting if the author was either less of a fan of the guys in spiffy grey uniforms, a better writer, or preferably both. A minimal comprehension of the technical aspects would have been nice too
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Old 08-05-2012, 12:34 PM
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I'm reading Hornblower and the Atropos, my first Horatio Hornblower novel. It's alright. Bit of a slow read, but part of that might just be having been used to the soft pablum of my Star Trek novels!

Waiting on Amazon.ca to send me my first Leslie Charteris novel!
  #38  
Old 08-05-2012, 03:00 PM
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Finished The Clockwork Vampire Chronicles. As I've said, an homage to Gemmell, but IMO, not as good. It could have used a good editor, it wandered a lot repeated itself too often. The squabbling of the main protagonists got old and redundant quickly.

Still, for the most part, I enjoyed it.
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Old 08-05-2012, 05:49 PM
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I just finished A Clash of Kings. It wasn't 5 minutes before I'd changed my mind about not reading past the TV series, so now I'm onto A Storm of Swords.
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Old 08-05-2012, 09:14 PM
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I just finished A Clash of Kings. It wasn't 5 minutes before I'd changed my mind about not reading past the TV series, so now I'm onto A Storm of Swords.
Resistance to Martin is futile. Hope you like the next one too!
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Old 08-06-2012, 08:36 AM
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Just started on Cleaning House: a momís 12-month experiment to rid her home of youth entitlement, by Kay Wyma. Iím already having some doubts about this one. For instance, her epiphany about how spoiled her kids are was brought on by her teenage sonís fantasizing about whether heíd rather have a Lamborghini or a Porsche. Big whoop. Also, something about the tone of the writing has me thinking sheís going to bring up religious faith soon, and when she does, Iíll be finished reading this book. *sigh* Or maybe itíll be full of great ideas for me to implement at home.
Well, she made it to page 118 before she drew a parallel between how we give kids responsibilities and how God gives us tasks. I was ready to put this book down anyway; I wasnít finding anything useful in it.

Now on to Blood Lite III: Aftertaste, short humor/horror stories. Ah, this is more like it!
  #42  
Old 08-06-2012, 09:34 AM
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I just finished A Clash of Kings. It wasn't 5 minutes before I'd changed my mind about not reading past the TV series, so now I'm onto A Storm of Swords.
A Storm of Swords is my favorite book of the series.

Over the weekend I read Kingdom of Strangers, by ZoŽ Ferraris, which is the third book of a contemporary mystery series set in Saudi Arabia. These are worth a read - the setting is as strange to me as anything depicted in science fiction or fantasy. Women keep their faces covered; men and women use separate building entrances and separate rooms. Unrelated men and women aren't supposed to talk to each other, making a police investigation rather tricky.
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Old 08-06-2012, 10:09 AM
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Started Divergent, another YA novel set in a distopian future. Our heroine lives with her family in one of five factions, into which all citizens are organized. There is a six group, the "factionless" that live apart from society and perform all the really awful jobs, rather like the Untouchable caste in historical India. At 16, you get to choose which faction you'll join as an adult - everyone takes a test that indicates faction alignment, but you aren't required to choose that faction or the faction in which you grew up. Our heroine has chosen her faction and is now in initiation, and she's beginning to realize that all isn't as it seems - something's rotten in the state of Denmark. But that's OK, because she's hiding her own secrets.

It's good - a quick read, but engaging. I'm finding the characters realistic, although a few of the antagonists are pretty cartoony and one-dimensional. I'm not sure that the motivations of the factions really ring true, but I'll accept it for this world the author's building. It's the first in a (right now) 2 book series, so we'll see how it goes. I'm about 40% through it.
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Old 08-06-2012, 12:18 PM
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Over the weekend I got sidelined by The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Volume III: Century, written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Kevin O'Neill. The first two are set in 1910 and 1969. Not as good as the earlier volumes, I'd say, but still pretty interesting, with so many British pop-culture allusions, I'm sure many are going over my head.
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Old 08-07-2012, 07:40 AM
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I continue my fascination with Parade's End, rereading it & seeking out other works by & about Ford Madox Ford.

Thinking it was time to take a break--& read something more American--I picked Okla Hannali off the shelf. R A Lafferty may be my favorite writer--a master of shaggy dog tales disguised as speculative fiction. Did I wait so long to read this one because it's all that's left--unless more of his OOP work comes to light?

Quote:
Consider yourself very lucky if you have found and read this book. Only a few thousand copies were printed. Best known for science fiction grounded in the tall tale tradition, Lafferty in 1972 produced this astonishing historical fiction about a Native American named Hannali Innominee, The Choctaw Giant. ďOkla HannaliĒ is a boisterous, eccentric tapestry studded with the language, history and customs of the various cultures who competed for early North America.

Into this pageant steps Laffertyís giant.....

Innominee is not only a remarkable fictional character, but he also serves as a representation of several real Native Americans who absorbed and transformed great chunks of European culture to become self-taught polyglots; renaissance men in buckskin. There is also much of the author in frontier eclectic Innominee, which I know from having been acquainted with Lafferty when I was younger.
The beautifully intoxicating tall tale is interspersed with crystal-clear prose explaining the removal of the Southern Indians to Indian Territory--and what happened to them there. That part of the story cuts like a knife.

The book is back in print; buy it from Amazon or The Choctaw Nation.
  #46  
Old 08-07-2012, 08:27 AM
yellowval is offline
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Originally Posted by Dung Beetle View Post
Just started on Cleaning House: a momís 12-month experiment to rid her home of youth entitlement, by Kay Wyma. Iím already having some doubts about this one. For instance, her epiphany about how spoiled her kids are was brought on by her teenage sonís fantasizing about whether heíd rather have a Lamborghini or a Porsche. Big whoop. Also, something about the tone of the writing has me thinking sheís going to bring up religious faith soon, and when she does, Iíll be finished reading this book. *sigh* Or maybe itíll be full of great ideas for me to implement at home.
Isn't that what all teenage boys fantasize about? That's just silly.

I'm into "The Long Winter" now. Over halfway there! I also haven't felt the desire to pick up "The Terror" again since I last posted, so I think I'll let that one go for now. I might try it again in the future.
  #47  
Old 08-07-2012, 08:30 AM
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Starting The Stranger You Seek by Amanda Kyle Williams, about a former FBI profiler whose career was ruined by her drinking, and now she's a private eye working on a serial killer case. Sounds pretty standard, but so far it seems to have some imagination. We'll see.
  #48  
Old 08-08-2012, 11:35 AM
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I finished Arsenals of Folly by Richard Rhodes. I was hoping it would be a general history of ICBM's, similar to his history of the Atomic Bomb and his history of the Hydrogen Bomb, both of which were excellent.

Instead it was a abbreviated history of Arms control efforts in the last decade of the Cold War. Sort of interesting, as I was too young at the time to be aware of the details of what was going on at the time, but even with that, I don't think I'd recommend it.

I then read The Magicians by Lev Grossman. Which was fun, if kind of depressing. Also, even though I really liked it, I'm not sure I really have much desire to read the sequel. The book ended in a good place, and the evil-Narnia the characters visit was interesting enough to fill out the last third of the first book, but doesn't really seem interesting enough to support much more then that.

Now I'm reading Millionaire by Janet Gleeson, a biography of John Law; an early 18th century gambler, fugitive and economist who created a stock market bubble in France and introduced France's first paper currency. I heard a blurb about him on NPR, then walked into a used book store and saw the biography, figured it was kismet and bought it. Good so far.
  #49  
Old 08-08-2012, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Simplicio View Post
I then read The Magicians by Lev Grossman. Which was fun, if kind of depressing. Also, even though I really liked it, I'm not sure I really have much desire to read the sequel. The book ended in a good place, and the evil-Narnia the characters visit was interesting enough to fill out the last third of the first book, but doesn't really seem interesting enough to support much more then that.
That's my absolute favorite book and even I couldn't tell you, with 100% uncertainty, that you'd enjoy it. It wasn't bad in the least, but the ending felt rushed. Seems like it's the second book in a trilogy.
  #50  
Old 08-08-2012, 11:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simplicio View Post
I finished Arsenals of Folly by Richard Rhodes. I was hoping it would be a general history of ICBM's, similar to his history of the Atomic Bomb and his history of the Hydrogen Bomb, both of which were excellent.

Instead it was a abbreviated history of Arms control efforts in the last decade of the Cold War. Sort of interesting, as I was too young at the time to be aware of the details of what was going on at the time, but even with that, I don't think I'd recommend it....
May I recommend The Secret State by Peter Hennessy, about the UK during the Cold War, and British political and military preparations for WWIII? Good stuff.
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