The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > Cafe Society

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-06-2012, 08:05 AM
Loach Loach is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Bo Dietl Arby's commercial about Subway

There is a commercial with former NYPD detective (and author/talking head) Bo Dietl stating that all Subway cold cuts are sliced in a factory and shipped there. Any Subway workers out there? Is that true? The only reason why I ask is that back in the late 80s I worked in a Subway in College Park Maryland. We sliced our own meat in the back. I remember having to slice the meat amazingly thin. It was prepared on a piece of wax paper and each one had to have a very specific number of pieces per sandwich. But we did it ourselves. This was back in the day when we still have to cut the bread with a u-shaped slice instead of a normal straight across cut. So when did they change and go to pre-sliced meat?
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 10-06-2012, 09:26 AM
jnglmassiv jnglmassiv is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Chicago's Northside
Posts: 1,996
I'd be flabbergasted if that facility was owned or operated by Subway. This type of thing is basically always contracted.
Link to the ad
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-06-2012, 09:55 AM
astro astro is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
It's $ 5.00 for a wad of bread and meat and veggies the size of a toddlers leg. Of course it's fresh sliced prime cut meats and all the veggies are grown in hydroponic tanks in the back.

In the next shopping center over Primo Hoagies charges roughly twice as much for the same sized sandwich,

You get what you pay for in both instances.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-06-2012, 09:56 AM
kayaker kayaker is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 14,696
My daughter worked at a Subway for about a week during her summer break last year. She was required to count how many black olives were placed on a sandwich.

/tangential anecdote
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:03 AM
Musicat Musicat is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Sturgeon Bay, WI USA
Posts: 17,527
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
My daughter worked at a Subway for about a week during her summer break last year. She was required to count how many black olives were placed on a sandwich.

/tangential anecdote
That's called portion control, and every franchise (and most restaurants) do it. Profit margins are thin and every effort is made to keep costs within a narrow range.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:03 AM
Loach Loach is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by astro View Post
It's $ 5.00 for a wad of bread and meat and veggies the size of a toddlers leg. Of course it's fresh sliced prime cut meats and all the veggies are grown in hydroponic tanks in the back.

In the next shopping center over Primo Hoagies charges roughly twice as much for the same sized sandwich,

You get what you pay for in both instances.
As stated in the OP I worked in a Subway. Back then we sliced the meat in the back.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:07 AM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 16,576
I don't know the answer to the question, but lots of people make sandwiches at home from presliced meat, whether it's the prepackaged stuff or the meat that the guy at the deli counter slices on order. Who cares if Subway uses presliced meat?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:23 AM
kayaker kayaker is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 14,696
Quote:
Originally Posted by Musicat View Post
That's called portion control, and every franchise (and most restaurants) do it. Profit margins are thin and every effort is made to keep costs within a narrow range.
Yes, I understand that. But this particular franchisee was extraordinarily anal about it.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:35 AM
needscoffee needscoffee is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loach View Post
<snip>This was back in the day when we still have to cut the bread with a u-shaped slice instead of a normal straight across cut.<snip>
I can't figure out what a u-shaped slice is.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:39 AM
Telemark Telemark is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Hub of the sports world
Posts: 14,863
Quote:
Originally Posted by needscoffee View Post
I can't figure out what a u-shaped slice is.
Picture taking a V-shaped chunk of bread out of the top of a roll, laying the ingredients in the trough, and replacing the V-shaped chunk of bread on top. It was a better sandwich, but took more time and skill to make.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:40 AM
J Cubed J Cubed is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
It's more of a V. Subway used to cut a center channel down the bread loaf, put the meat slices in there, then put the tiny little top piece back on.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:42 AM
core_dump core_dump is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
For what it's worth, last time I was in a Subway around here (not more than a few years ago) they were still cutting the U slice. I don't see how the toppings could get piled on and stay in there so well without it?

When I try this cut at home I usually end up with a mess. I blame my knife, not the skills of the chef.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:50 AM
Loach Loach is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by J Cubed View Post
It's more of a V. Subway used to cut a center channel down the bread loaf, put the meat slices in there, then put the tiny little top piece back on.
Yes. It made it look like there was more meat in the sandwich. But it made it difficult to keep all the other toppings on it.

Quote:
Yes, I understand that. But this particular franchisee was extraordinarily anal about it.
They were back then too. There were diagrams showing how many slices per sandwich. The meat had to be paper thin. It was sliced the day before but it did not come in pre-sliced.

Quote:
I don't know the answer to the question, but lots of people make sandwiches at home from presliced meat, whether it's the prepackaged stuff or the meat that the guy at the deli counter slices on order. Who cares if Subway uses presliced meat?
YMMV of course but freshly sliced sandwich meat is always better. The taste rapidly declines after slicing.



Old thread about changing how they cut the bread. http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=223796
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:53 AM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 16,576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
Picture taking a V-shaped chunk of bread out of the top of a roll, laying the ingredients in the trough, and replacing the V-shaped chunk of bread on top. It was a better sandwich, but took more time and skill to make.
I remember when Subway used to make sandwiches like that. I think they tasted better back then too.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-06-2012, 12:48 PM
Colibri Colibri is offline
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 25,559
Let's move this over to Cafe Society.

Colibri
General Questions Moderator
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-06-2012, 02:59 PM
ptr2void ptr2void is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnglmassiv View Post
I'd be flabbergasted if that facility was owned or operated by Subway. This type of thing is basically always contracted.
Link to the ad
But it's right in the ad?

"Facility shown is one of several slicing facilities used by Subway."

Link to screenshot
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10-06-2012, 03:49 PM
Jophiel Jophiel is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
My daughter worked at a Subway for about a week during her summer break last year. She was required to count how many black olives were placed on a sandwich.

/tangential anecdote
A friend of mine used to manage a Subway. They had some very scant number per sandwich and were supposed to be "garnish" rather than an ingredient. Having to constantly fight against people who treated the black olive slices like gold just to get enough to taste was one reason why Subway found itself dropped from my usual list of places to eat.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10-06-2012, 03:58 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 30,438
Just another random data point: I don't know about Subway, but I worked at Jimmy John's in the late 90s, and we sliced our own meat and cheese in-house, too.

Last edited by pulykamell; 10-06-2012 at 04:00 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 10-06-2012, 04:56 PM
fubbleskag fubbleskag is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
I stopped eating at subway when they dropped the u--gouge. Then an employee told me that they would make my sandwich the old way on request. Been ordering it that way ever since without issue.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 10-06-2012, 05:32 PM
Loach Loach is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
Let's move this over to Cafe Society.

Colibri
General Questions Moderator
I was looking for a factual answer. Not about the food itself. The rest is just a bonus.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 10-06-2012, 06:06 PM
voltaire voltaire is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
If I may be allowed to piggyback a question I had about the same Arby's commercial...

I always had the (perhaps false) impression that Arby's roast beef was sliced from something more like a "potted" meat, like Spam, except beef. Is Arby's roast beef actual *whole* meat? It sure doesn't appear or taste that way. (Not that I particularly hate or love the stuff, it's just meh.)

If my suspicion is correct, bragging about slicing their "meat" fresh in-house would be a pretty silly distinction to make.

So, what's the straight dope? Is Arby's roast beef real, whole meat, or not? I've never noticed anything resembling a "grain" to the meat that would make me think it's real.

Last edited by voltaire; 10-06-2012 at 06:09 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 10-06-2012, 06:12 PM
running coach running coach is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Riding my handcycle
Posts: 15,373
Quote:
Originally Posted by voltaire View Post
So, what's the straight dope? Is Arby's roast beef real, whole meat, or not? I've never noticed anything resembling a "grain" to the meat that would make me think it's real.
Take a plastic bag and fill it with about 7 lbs. of beef chunks. Fill the rest of the way with a beef slurry(finely ground beef and fat with some salty water) for a total weight of 10 lbs. Freeze. Thaw, roast and slice.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 10-06-2012, 06:12 PM
JXJohns JXJohns is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
This was somewhat a big deal here due to the factory being in Iowa. A link to the story in the local paper.

Yes its true
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 10-06-2012, 06:17 PM
voltaire voltaire is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by runner pat View Post
Take a plastic bag and fill it with about 7 lbs. of beef chunks. Fill the rest of the way with a beef slurry(finely ground beef and fat with some salty water) for a total weight of 10 lbs. Freeze. Thaw, roast and slice.
So, as I suspected, their bragging about slicing their "meat" fresh is tantamount to bragging about freshly sliced Spam? Yeah, that is a silly distinction to try to make...
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 10-06-2012, 06:29 PM
jnglmassiv jnglmassiv is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Chicago's Northside
Posts: 1,996
Quote:
Originally Posted by ptr2void View Post
But it's right in the ad?

"Facility shown is one of several slicing facilities used by Subway."

Link to screenshot
I've professionally visited a commercial bakery used by McDonalds for production of some of their buns. It is definitely not McDonalds and they also make baked goods for other entities.
I've visited the manufacturer of a popular line of Japanese-sounding soy and other sauces that you have probably heard of. But you've never heard of the company that actually makes the stuff.
Finally, I've visited a no-name factory that cuts and wet/vacuum-ages steaks for some huge, nationally advertised family steak restaurants.

Again, this stuff is almost always contracted out. Once a chain gets to a certain size, they have to concentrate on running and marketing for those stores rather than the difficult practice of operating efficient food production factories.

A surprising one to me is that Panera actually mixes their most of their own dough at one of (I think) ten facilities which is then trucked to the retail stores nationwide where it is locally baked.

On preview, the linked Iowa article confirms my speculation. The plant in the ad is operated by West Liberty Foods.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 10-06-2012, 07:44 PM
Loach Loach is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by voltaire View Post
So, as I suspected, their bragging about slicing their "meat" fresh is tantamount to bragging about freshly sliced Spam? Yeah, that is a silly distinction to try to make...
I think the commercial was pushing their turkey sandwich.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 10-06-2012, 08:45 PM
Digital is the new Analog Digital is the new Analog is online now
Apple Advisory Board
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Mount Crumpit
Posts: 3,905
Quote:
Originally Posted by voltaire View Post
So, what's the straight dope? Is Arby's roast beef real, whole meat, or not? I've never noticed anything resembling a "grain" to the meat that would make me think it's real.
I can't comment on what they serve at the restaurants, but I used to work in the same building as Arby's Test Kitchen. And they made honest-to-god, normal, really tasty roast beef there. I've seen it in the ovens.

Sometimes when they were playing with spice mixtures or cookies or other things, they'd leave extras with security. And security would call me and suggest that I go to the first floor for a visit.


-D/a
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 10-06-2012, 09:10 PM
Mihai Yu Ri Mihai Yu Ri is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by fubbleskag View Post
I stopped eating at subway when they dropped the u--gouge. Then an employee told me that they would make my sandwich the old way on request. Been ordering it that way ever since without issue.
Not only did they used to cut the u-gouge, they put the mayo/mustard on the bread, then the cheese, then meat, topped by veggies... I ALWAYS make the employees do it in this order... It usually irritates them, as they don't know how to cut it, and the sauces are the last step now, so they have to carry the bread all the way over to the end of the counter, and bring it back over.

The way they make it now, is just a mess... I grew up inside of two subways that my parents ran for 15 years. My father decided the last straw in his role as an owner was when they forced all the owners to ditch the "old NYC subway train" themed wall paper and pictures.



...And yes, Arby's uses a gelatinous type of meet mold that they indeed slice "fresh".

Applebees uses a seasoning called "apple seasoning" on EVERYTHING they serve.. but that is a topic for another discussion.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:05 PM
voltaire voltaire is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loach View Post
I think the commercial was pushing their turkey sandwich.
Ah, okay, that would make a lot more sense, assuming it is real, whole turkey breast they're talking about.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:16 PM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 16,576
If the roast beef isn't real, whole roast beef, I very much doubt that the turkey is either.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:43 PM
Lancia Lancia is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
My first job in highschool was @ a subway. This would have been bout 1997 or therabouts.

No meat was sliced in the store. It came in a big box (frozen, in layers between plastic, which made it easier to put the sandwiches together). We would put a few boxes in the fridge to thaw and rotate them out as needed. We did slice some veggies, cucumbers and tomatoes IIRC. Never meat. In fact, everything but the veggies came frozen: cookie and bread dough, soup mixes, marinara sauce, tuna and crab salad mixes. Any veggies that could come canned were ordered that way.

No idea if it's still done that way.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 10-08-2012, 07:46 AM
anson2995 anson2995 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 2,720
Subway is the largest restaurant chain in the world with nearly 38,000 locations. Unlike McDonalds and other competitors, Subway locations are all franchises. Ie, nit a single one is owned by the corporation. I suspect that there's a lot of variation between locations.

But regardless, I thought the whole point of the ad was confusing. Does the fact that the cold cuts aren't sliced in the store imply that they're less fresh? That the quality of the meat is less? Arby's has some cojones to be arguing either case.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 10-08-2012, 11:36 AM
GrandWino GrandWino is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Arby's has changed the ad due to angry Iowans.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 10-08-2012, 11:42 AM
Inner Stickler Inner Stickler is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey Finn View Post
If the roast beef isn't real, whole roast beef, I very much doubt that the turkey is either.
When I worked at Arby's the roast beef came frozen in unlabeled plastic wrap. Beef chunks with slurry? Ok, sure. It looked like a big ole hunk of meat to me but frozen and unlabeled can hide a lot of stuff. It took 4ish hours in the oven to cook though. The turkey came in smaller hunks labeled with an actual company's name and had to be sliced just like the roast beef. Actually, the ham, corned beef and turkey all came in small hunks labeled appropriately and needing slicing. As far as I or anyone else was aware, the turkey we served was no different than the turkey hunks you might pick up in the prepackaged meat section in the grocery store.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 10-08-2012, 12:29 PM
control-z control-z is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
I get the impression that most deli meats are just sliced meat paste. Even if Arbys does slice their meat in the restaurant, it doesn't mean it's any fresher or better than Subways. Maybe it is, but where it is sliced doesn't seem like it would make much difference.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 10-08-2012, 12:36 PM
control-z control-z is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Missed the edit window, the deli meats in my local Subway definitely come in a sealed plastic wrapper, looks like about a 5" high stack of sliced meat. They cut open the bag and put the meat in one of the black plastic containers in the ingredients area, that's it.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 10-08-2012, 12:40 PM
Procrustus Procrustus is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Pacific NW.
Posts: 4,784
I was surprised by that commercial. Where the meat is sliced is probably the least important thing I care about in a sandwich.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 10-08-2012, 12:44 PM
Vinyl Turnip Vinyl Turnip is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: <--- <--- <---
Posts: 14,801
Quote:
Originally Posted by fubbleskag View Post
I stopped eating at subway when they dropped the u--gouge.
Really? I hated that and was glad they stopped doing it.

Since it was apparently important enough for you to (temporarily) stop eating there over it, can I ask what the big advantage is? I realize it made the toppings more visible (which was good for them, I guess, because it created the illusion you were getting more), but all it ever did for me as a sandwich-eater was force my hand into a "claw" to hold the top piece of bread, lest I get mustard/oil/vinegar smeared all over my fingers.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 10-08-2012, 12:45 PM
voltaire voltaire is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by control-z View Post
I get the impression that most deli meats are just sliced meat paste.
I dunno what kind of roast-beef you get at the deli, but it's usually very obviously got a grain to it that you'd expect to see in whole flesh.

Arby's roast-beef? Not so much... looks much more like Steak-Ums.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 10-08-2012, 01:55 PM
control-z control-z is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by voltaire View Post
I dunno what kind of roast-beef you get at the deli, but it's usually very obviously got a grain to it that you'd expect to see in whole flesh.

Arby's roast-beef? Not so much... looks much more like Steak-Ums™.
A real deli, yes. But deli meats in a restaurant or supermarket are usually the processed stuff.
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 10-08-2012, 02:23 PM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by anson2995 View Post
Unlike McDonalds and other competitors, Subway locations are all franchises.
Most fast-food restaurants are actually franchised:

70% of McDonalds restaurants worldwide are franchisee-owned. McDonalds only operates 15% of their restaurants themselves.

90% of Burger King restaurants are franchisee-owned.

80+% of Taco Bell restaurants are franchisee-owned.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 10-08-2012, 02:35 PM
running coach running coach is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Riding my handcycle
Posts: 15,373
Quote:
Originally Posted by control-z View Post
A real deli, yes. But deli meats in a restaurant or supermarket are usually the processed stuff.
Speaking of real delis, why would anyone in NYC go to Arby's(or Subway for that matter) for a deli-style sandwich?
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 10-08-2012, 02:42 PM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is offline
Voodoo Adult (Slight Return)
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Charlotte, NC, USA
Posts: 24,018
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
Most fast-food restaurants are actually franchised
You understand that most < all, right? That was the point that was being made.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 10-08-2012, 04:22 PM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by KneadToKnow View Post
You understand that most < all, right?
Having passed math in 4th grade, yes, I do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KneadToKnow View Post
That was the point that was being made.
The point that was being made was:

Quote:
Originally Posted by anson2995
I suspect that there's a lot of variation between locations.
Being 100% franchisee-owned versus 70+% franchisee-owned probably doesn't make much of a difference in this regard.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 10-08-2012, 07:16 PM
D_Odds D_Odds is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Queens
Posts: 10,116
Quote:
Originally Posted by runner pat View Post
Speaking of real delis, why would anyone in NYC go to Arby's(or Subway for that matter) for a deli-style sandwich?
I ask that all the time myself. I guess one must love sliced cucumbers, as I general don't see those available. Doesn't mean they aren't, just I haven't noticed them.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 10-09-2012, 11:46 AM
Apocalypso Apocalypso is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
I guess Arbys doesn't have much else they can claim as an advantage over their competitors. Their "Frankenroasts" are made in a factory and shipped to the restaurants. Who cares whether it comes pre-sliced or sliced at the restaurant, it's still solidified meat paste. It's like a politician arguing that HIS mistress goes to church every Sunday.

Re: Subway counting olive slices: I have only been to one Subway that was stingy with their ingredients. I wouldn't be at all surprised if some franchise owners were really anal about portion control but it's far from the norm in my experience. I've only been to a very small portion of the 80,000 franchises though.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 10-09-2012, 11:54 AM
fubbleskag fubbleskag is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinyl Turnip View Post
Really? I hated that and was glad they stopped doing it.

Since it was apparently important enough for you to (temporarily) stop eating there over it, can I ask what the big advantage is?
no advantage, I just really hate change.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 10-09-2012, 12:51 PM
Beware of Doug Beware of Doug is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by JXJohns View Post
This was somewhat a big deal here due to the factory being in Iowa. A link to the story in the local paper.

Yes its true
Bo's a New Yorker. To them real food doesn't come from Iowa.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 10-09-2012, 01:06 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
I won't eat food from either of those places, so I don't care.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 10-09-2012, 01:46 PM
Loach Loach is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Procrustus View Post
I was surprised by that commercial. Where the meat is sliced is probably the least important thing I care about in a sandwich.
One of the most important IMHO. Deli meats get stale quick.


Quote:
Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
I won't eat food from either of those places, so I don't care.
Glad you could drop by.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.