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  #1  
Old 12-06-2012, 04:45 AM
Rilchiam Rilchiam is offline
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Is my chocolate mousse safe to eat?

Melt the chocolate in water. Beat egg yolks and stir in. Beat egg whites with a pinch of salt; stir in. Whip cream, add sugar, fold in. Fridge for a few hours, then dig in!

Only Mr. Rilch doesn't want any. Because this is the first time he watched the process. The eggs haven't been cooked, so he's sure he'll get e.coli. Thing is, I've been making this for years, at least twenty times, and neither he nor I nor anyone has ever had any ill effects. So what's the potential harm? Or have I just been lucky so far? (Twenty times or more.) Is it safe to eat this mousse, the way I described it?
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  #2  
Old 12-06-2012, 04:56 AM
Face Intentionally Left Blank Face Intentionally Left Blank is offline
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Not a chef or a doctor. I like eating raw cookie dough when we bake cookies, the kind where they tell you, "Don't eat the cookie dough raw", because of the egg in it. There's a risk, I'm sure of it, but I never got sick. I once got food poisoning from a hamburger at an all-night diner though, and there was no warning on it, the bastids!

You've drawn me into your mystery now. Aren't there many recipes that call for raw egg? How are we supposed to play it safe, and still enjoy these recipes? Do most people ignore this and a very small percentage (similar to the number of people that get hit by lightning) get sick? I gots to know!
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  #3  
Old 12-06-2012, 07:05 AM
Alice The Goon Alice The Goon is offline
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It's salmonella that's the worry from raw eggs, not e. coli, and the chances of any given egg having it are ~1 in 30,000*. So you just have to ask yourself, do ya feel lucky, punk? Well, do ya?





*Supposedly. I've seen odds that are much higher than that but I don't recall the source.

Last edited by Alice The Goon; 12-06-2012 at 07:07 AM..
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  #4  
Old 12-06-2012, 07:46 AM
muldoonthief muldoonthief is online now
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Alton Brown would tell you to eat it. Or if you're super paranoid (or want to feed it to elderly, infants, or immunocompromised people), buy pasteurized eggs.

I'd certainly eat it.
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  #5  
Old 12-06-2012, 07:48 AM
Athena Athena is online now
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I'd eat it. I've had plenty of raw eggs in my life, and never gotten sick from them.


It's a common-sense issue. Common sense says if you've served the mousse for 20 years, and nobody's gotten sick, then it's probably OK. Common sense also says that raw eggs can carry salmonella, so I'd avoid serving your mousse to young children, old and/or frail people, or otherwise not-quite-healthy people. Chances are it won't hurt them, though.

Really, when you start to read about food safety, it's amazing that we're not all sick, all of the time. Every time you put something in your mouth you take a risk. Cross contamination is extremely easy, and most of us in home kitchens rarely think about it. Sure, we do when it comes to chicken and eggs and some other meats, but you can as easily get E. Coli from uncooked veggies as you can from improperly handled meat.
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  #6  
Old 12-06-2012, 07:48 AM
RobDog RobDog is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rilchiam View Post
Melt the chocolate in water. Beat egg yolks and stir in. Beat egg whites with a pinch of salt; stir in. Whip cream, add sugar, fold in. Fridge for a few hours, then dig in!

Only Mr. Rilch doesn't want any. Because this is the first time he watched the process. The eggs haven't been cooked, so he's sure he'll get e.coli. Thing is, I've been making this for years, at least twenty times, and neither he nor I nor anyone has ever had any ill effects. So what's the potential harm? Or have I just been lucky so far? (Twenty times or more.) Is it safe to eat this mousse, the way I described it?
Only one way to find out.... pass it over
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  #7  
Old 12-06-2012, 07:53 AM
Tapiotar Tapiotar is offline
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Eggs from commercial producers in the US have clean shells, washed in chlorinated water before candling, grading, and packing. Make sure you don't used cracked eggs, and they should be fine. If you buy eggs from free range chickens, they are more likely to have been sitting in chicken poop or other undesireable stuff before they were picked. If you don't know if the producer washes them in chlorinated water or not, wash the eggs before breaking yourself. And don't use cracked eggs unless you are going to cook them.

I've eaten raw cookie dough all my life, eaten chocolate, and have never gotten sick. You are more likely to get salmonella from pet turtles or other sources than from eating eggs.

Ditto RobDog: I'll take the unwanted mousse off of your hands, also.

Last edited by Tapiotar; 12-06-2012 at 07:56 AM..
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  #8  
Old 12-06-2012, 07:59 AM
RobDog RobDog is online now
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Originally Posted by Tapiotar View Post
...

Ditto RobDog: I'll take the unwanted mousse off of your hands, also.
Not until after I've licked them you won't.
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  #9  
Old 12-06-2012, 08:34 AM
WhyNot WhyNot is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tapiotar
Eggs from commercial producers in the US have clean shells, washed in chlorinated water before candling, grading, and packing. Make sure you don't used cracked eggs, and they should be fine. If you buy eggs from free range chickens, they are more likely to have been sitting in chicken poop or other undesireable stuff before they were picked.
This is about exactly backwards. Eggs from cage free hens show less, not more, salmonella contamination - but the sample size is much smaller and definitions of "cage free" vary so much as to be nearly meaningless, so I wouldn't put faith in a cage free stamp and declare those eggs perfectly safe.

The problem, as I understand it, is that salmonella is now being found on the inside of intact, fresh chicken eggshells. It's contaminated before it even leaves the bird. This didn't used to be the case, but something (Antibiotics in feed? Laying pens? Overcrowded conditions? Inbred hens? Eradication of other salmonella strains that sickened chickens? I don't think anyone's certain yet.) has changed in the egg production cycle with modern egg farming techniques that's encouraged the salmonella bacteria and contaminated what were previously safe foods.

So it's riskier to eat raw eggs now than it was when you were a kid. It's still a pretty low risk, though.
Quote:
The inside of an egg was once considered almost sterile. But, over recent years, the bacterium Salmonella enteritidis (Se) has been found inside a small number of eggs. Scientists estimate that, on average across the U.S., only 1 of every 20,000 eggs might contain the bacteria. So, the likelihood that an egg might contain Se is extremely small – 0.005% (five one-thousandths of one percent). At this rate, if you’re an average consumer, you might encounter a contaminated egg once every 84 years.
http://www.incredibleegg.org/egg-fac...-food-safety#5
Quote:
The case for cage-free eggs is also subject to debate. Some scientific studies, mostly conducted in Europe, have found lower salmonella rates in flocks of cage-free hens, compared with hens living in cages. But that could be explained by the fact that the cage-free henhouses in the studies were often newer and less likely to harbor the rodents that can spread salmonella.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/26/we...eggs.html?_r=0

Me? I'd eat the mousse. 'Cause that's why I have an immune system, and when chocolate mousse is on the line, sometimes ya gotta roll the dice!

Last edited by WhyNot; 12-06-2012 at 08:35 AM..
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  #10  
Old 12-06-2012, 08:40 AM
Skammer Skammer is online now
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I make egg nog every year with raw eggs and no one has ever gotten sick. But there are a few people I don't mention the raw eggs part to.
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  #11  
Old 12-06-2012, 08:45 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is online now
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The problem with raw eggs is somewhat exagerrated. Every year at Christmas time millions of people (maybe millions, I don't know how many) will drink egg nog made with raw egg. Very few will become ill. And it's most likely if they do fall ill it's because that egg nog wasn't kept cold. For those who are concerned you can read the various procedures in this document. Heating eggs to a temperature of 120F has often been suggested, but that is insufficient to stop the growth of salmonella. But going much higher than that will solidify the whites. If it's a real concern, stick to yolks which have been heated to 150F or higher.
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  #12  
Old 12-06-2012, 08:57 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muldoonthief View Post
Or if you're super paranoid (or want to feed it to elderly, infants, or immunocompromised people), buy pasteurized eggs.
This exactly. Just buy pasteurized eggs for your risk-averse husband when you make mousse and you should be good to go. I've eaten a lot of raw eggs in my life but never have gotten sick from them. (Well, that's not 100% true. I had some soft-cooked eggs that were "off" in Transylvania, and I became terribly sick within around eight hours with fever, extreme chills, and diarrhea [no vomiting, though]. Took three or four days to fully recover. Probably should have gone to the doctor. Still, that one incident didn't stop me, and it was my fault for eating eggs the other diners I was with said "smelled funny.")

Last edited by pulykamell; 12-06-2012 at 08:58 AM..
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  #13  
Old 12-06-2012, 10:38 AM
Little Bird Little Bird is offline
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Originally Posted by Tapiotar View Post
If you don't know if the producer washes them in chlorinated water or not, wash the eggs before breaking yourself.
I have backyard chickens and have done research into washing eggs and what I've come across says basically the opposite this. Eggs come out with a "bloom" a thin waxy covering that prevents germs from penetrating the egg, therefore an egg with the bloom left on will be safer than a washed egg. If you must wash the egg, do so just before you use it and use very hot water, but really it's not necessary. My girls only rarely get poo on their eggs any more, their first month of laying was a bit of a learning process for them. If I do get an egg with a little poo on, I just flick it off and use that egg that day, without refrigerating it and possibly contaminating the other food in my fridge.
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  #14  
Old 12-06-2012, 12:21 PM
Chef Troy Chef Troy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
This exactly. Just buy pasteurized eggs for your risk-averse husband when you make mousse and you should be good to go. I've eaten a lot of raw eggs in my life but never have gotten sick from them. (Well, that's not 100% true. I had some soft-cooked eggs that were "off" in Transylvania, and I became terribly sick within around eight hours with fever, extreme chills, and diarrhea [no vomiting, though]. Took three or four days to fully recover. Probably should have gone to the doctor. Still, that one incident didn't stop me, and it was my fault for eating eggs the other diners I was with said "smelled funny.")
And then after that first carton of pasteurized eggs is used up... save the package and reload with regular eggs.
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  #15  
Old 12-06-2012, 12:32 PM
AngelSoft AngelSoft is offline
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Originally Posted by Little Bird View Post
I have backyard chickens and have done research into washing eggs and what I've come across says basically the opposite this. Eggs come out with a "bloom" a thin waxy covering that prevents germs from penetrating the egg, therefore an egg with the bloom left on will be safer than a washed egg. If you must wash the egg, do so just before you use it and use very hot water, but really it's not necessary. My girls only rarely get poo on their eggs any more, their first month of laying was a bit of a learning process for them. If I do get an egg with a little poo on, I just flick it off and use that egg that day, without refrigerating it and possibly contaminating the other food in my fridge.
Man, your chickens need to come teach ours how to lay then. They're constantly covered in filth. We usually just wash them with hot water and put them in the fridge though.
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  #16  
Old 12-06-2012, 04:39 PM
Rilchiam Rilchiam is offline
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Right: I meant salmonella, not e.coli. And he does drink eggnog. Well, I'll let him decide! Thanks to all who replied.
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  #17  
Old 12-06-2012, 05:05 PM
FoieGrasIsEvil FoieGrasIsEvil is offline
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If Rocky Balboa can chug a glass of raw eggs as part of his training regimen....surely your mousse is safe!
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  #18  
Old 12-06-2012, 05:55 PM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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I don't know...just because you've served mousse made with raw eggs for 20 years without incident, that doesn't mean the next time you'll be OK, the 21st year could be THE year. But I would certainly eat it. Chocolate mousse and key lime pie are worth taking a small chance!

Now, where do you get pasteurized eggs? Are they with other eggs in an average grocery store? Are they in cartons? I always hear 'use pasteurized eggs' but I don't think I've ever seen any.
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  #19  
Old 12-06-2012, 06:08 PM
April R April R is offline
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Quote:
RAW EGG SALAD
Ingredients

1 1/2 cups cashews

3/4 cup water

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

3/4 teaspoon turmeric

1 1/2 cloves garlic

3/4 teaspoon celtic sea salt

3 celery stalks - finely chopped (reserve!)

3/4 of a fresh red bell pepper - finely chopped (reserve!)

sprinkle pepper (reserve!)

sprinkle paprika (reserve!)


Directions

1. Add everything (except celery, red pepper, pepper, and paprika) into a high-speed blender. Blend very well until it resembles a smooth, creamy hollondaise sauce! (Note: if you don't own a super powerful blender try soaking the cashews for a few hours first to help soften them.)

2. Pour yellow "egg salad" liquid mixture into a large bowl. Add chopped celery, chopped red pepper and anything else you'd like to add, like chopped parsley or chopped white onion, too.

3. Mix everything together with a spoon until nicely coated, like in pictures. Sprinkle with pepper and paprika. Your raw egg salad recipe is now ready to eat!

4. Serve on romaine lettuce wraps for an raw egg salad sandwich experience. How do you like to enjoy this raw egg salad recipe?
The Rawtarian's Thoughts

Raw egg salad recipes - It's surprising that raw egg salad recipes have eluded me for almost two years. Believe it or not, I've never made a raw egg salad recipe before!

To my pleasant surprise, this raw egg salad recipe is, um, totally ridiculously incredible. It actually reminds me of egg salad! I have made a few sort of similar recipes in the past, but nothing that screamed "This tastes like egg salad!!" quite like this raw egg salad recipe.

This is quite a fatty, heavy-tasting recipe, so you'll want to ensure that you're serving it with lots of nice fresh veggies, especially romaine lettuce. Yum!
http://www.therawtarian.com/raw-egg-salad-recipe

I think you should start snaking raw eggs into your husband's diet. Wait a few months, then let him know he has been eating raw eggs the whole time and tell him to eat the damn mousse, LOL

Last edited by April R; 12-06-2012 at 06:08 PM..
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  #20  
Old 12-06-2012, 06:39 PM
WhyNot WhyNot is online now
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Originally Posted by salinqmind View Post
Now, where do you get pasteurized eggs? Are they with other eggs in an average grocery store? Are they in cartons? I always hear 'use pasteurized eggs' but I don't think I've ever seen any.
Yep, right next to the regular eggs, generally with an extra dollar in the price. The eggs themselves are stamped with a "P", so if you use an egg storage device, you can still tell which is which out of the carton.

http://www.browneyedbaker.com/wp-con...rized-eggs.jpg
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  #21  
Old 12-06-2012, 07:10 PM
Implicit Implicit is offline
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Originally Posted by Skammer View Post
I make egg nog every year with raw eggs and no one has ever gotten sick. But there are a few people I don't mention the raw eggs part to.
There are some people (older people, pregnant women, or people with weakened immune system) who shouldn't consume raw eggs since salmonella poisoning is likely to be more serious for them, so not mentioning the raw eggs isn't the best idea.
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  #22  
Old 12-07-2012, 10:34 AM
Quercus Quercus is offline
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Right, I'd say it's not that you've been lucky so far, it's more like you haven't been (pretty badly) unlucky. Remember, even if an egg does have detectable salmonella in it, that doesn't mean it will certainly make you sick. So your odds are even better than the 1 in 20,000 or whatever.
Which to me certainly seems worth the risk for mousse, egg nog, or cookie dough. Though I wouldn't give any to immune-sensitive folks (babies, pregnant women, organ-transplantees, surgically-created human-animal chimeras, etc.)
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  #23  
Old 12-07-2012, 11:42 AM
jsc1953 jsc1953 is offline
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You have to be careful with chocolate mousse. If it has a chalky undertaste, you could wind up getting raped by Satan and giving birth to the anti-Christ.

SPOILER:
Rosemary's Baby, in case you didn't catch the reference.
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  #24  
Old 12-07-2012, 08:34 PM
Rilchiam Rilchiam is offline
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No, I get that. It's why I never ever joke about it being chocolate "mouse".

Also, I should clarify. It's not twenty years I've been making this. I forget how many years it's been, but I've made it twenty times. Or more; maybe closer to thirty. And a lot of different people have shared it, presumably people with varying immune systems. No pregnant women, though!
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