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  #1  
Old 05-24-2013, 09:22 AM
Victor Charlie Victor Charlie is offline
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Why do invading aliens never wear clothes?

In the movies, aliens we meet on other planets usually wear clothing, i.e. "Star Wars", "Star Trek" et al. But those who attack us on Earth are usually nude, i.e. "War of the Worlds", "Signs", "Men in Black", "Independence Day", "Cowboys and Aliens" and many more. The exceptions to the latter nearly always involve aliens that are humanoid or take human form while on the planet. What's the dealio? My hypothesis: Attacking aliens need to be portrayed as merciless, animal-like killers, whereas those we contact elsewhere are often allies or our contemporaries so it makes sense for us to aesthetically relate.

Any other theories?
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  #2  
Old 05-24-2013, 09:28 AM
Intergalactic Gladiator Intergalactic Gladiator is offline
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Aliens have never partaken of the Forbidden Fruit and therefore do not feel the shame or need to clothe themselves.
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  #3  
Old 05-24-2013, 10:10 AM
MrDibble MrDibble is offline
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I think some of it stems from abductee literature on Greys, where there's this sort of confusion over whether the aliens are nude or just wearing tight-fitting clothing.

Kind of like Ents, that way.

Although I must quibble, the Independence Day aliens wear suits.

As does the bad guy in MiB. An "E'gar Suit" :P

Last edited by MrDibble; 05-24-2013 at 10:10 AM..
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  #4  
Old 05-24-2013, 10:14 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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It's true that most of the Invaders that wear clothes look exactly human. As a reason for this, not only are they almost always trying to Blend In, but imagine how it would look if the Invading Humans were naked. Not only would they run afoul of the Censors (in pre-ratings America), but they'd look either really silly , or really scary (a possibility that someone ought to follow up some time).

James Arness as The Thing from Another World wore a jumpsuit. The aliens in Earth vs. the Flying Saucers wore body armor. And Predator and his buddies in subsequent movies (two of which "invade' the earth) wear clothes. So do the macro-cephalic guys in Invasion of the Saucer Men They're human-shaped, but not human-appearing. And, of course, the Star Wars aliens all seem to wear clothes, except for Wookiees and Jabba the Hutt. As do the Green Martians in John Carter of Mars (as described by Burroughs, in fact). So did the exposed-brain Martians in Mars Attacks! (as in the Topps Trading Cards that film was based on) And the Tenctonese in Alien Nation and the following TV series wore clothes.But they're not invading.

You've touched on an interesting point that goes beyond clothes. It's long bothered me that Invading Aliens are portrayed as savage and bestial, even though they're technologically superior to us. In the more-faithful Carpenter remake of The Thing and the recent prequel, the shape-shifting alien is damned unsociable, despite being able to fly a flying saucer (Even if you argue that it shape-shifted and stole the saucer, it was still intelligent enough to fly it). A lot of other films, comics, and so forth have the same problem. It's gotten so that there's developed a meme to satisfy the paradox of bestial naked invaders with super-tecyhnology -- the inhabitants of the ship are really from an extraterrestrial circus or zoo, and Everything Gets Set Right when we finally help the Zookeeper (who's also nude) round them up. This one's been used in a few movies and comic books.


Ultimately, I think it's for several reasons:

a.) If an alien IS really humanoid, you don't show them naked, not only because it looks silly and would get you in trouble for nudity, but because we won't viscerally BUY a naked human. It looks wrong.
b.) The filmmmakers want us to see and appreciate the alien's shapes. It not only satisfies their want to show upp their model-making or animation or CGI effects, we can appreciate the body design.
c.) we don't really need to see clothes on a non-human form. It doesn't call out the same sense of wrongness as a naked human
d.) It empkasizes the alien-ness by not having them wear clothes,


By the way, the aliens in Independence Day were wrapped in those skin-like armore things, which seems as much like clothes as the "solidified electricity" suits the guys in Earth vs. the Flying Saucers wore.
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Old 05-24-2013, 11:37 AM
Victor Charlie Victor Charlie is offline
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Originally Posted by MrDibble View Post
I think some of it stems from abductee literature on Greys, where there's this sort of confusion over whether the aliens are nude or just wearing tight-fitting clothing.

Kind of like Ents, that way.

Although I must quibble, the Independence Day aliens wear suits.

As does the bad guy in MiB. An "E'gar Suit" :P
I partially accept your quibble. "The Independence Day" do seem to wear armor/mech when they're flying around in their fighters. But the alien operating the mothership is naked as a jaybird (I checked http://aliens.wikia.com/wiki/Independence_Day_Aliens )

And Edgar is wearing clothing but only when he's taking human/Vincent D'Onofrio form.
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  #6  
Old 05-24-2013, 11:48 AM
Victor Charlie Victor Charlie is offline
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Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
It's true that most of the Invaders that wear clothes look exactly human. As a reason for this, not only are they almost always trying to Blend In, but imagine how it would look if the Invading Humans were naked. Not only would they run afoul of the Censors (in pre-ratings America), but they'd look either really silly , or really scary (a possibility that someone ought to follow up some time).

James Arness as The Thing from Another World wore a jumpsuit. The aliens in Earth vs. the Flying Saucers wore body armor. And Predator and his buddies in subsequent movies (two of which "invade' the earth) wear clothes. So do the macro-cephalic guys in Invasion of the Saucer Men They're human-shaped, but not human-appearing. And, of course, the Star Wars aliens all seem to wear clothes, except for Wookiees and Jabba the Hutt. As do the Green Martians in John Carter of Mars (as described by Burroughs, in fact). So did the exposed-brain Martians in Mars Attacks! (as in the Topps Trading Cards that film was based on) And the Tenctonese in Alien Nation and the following TV series wore clothes.But they're not invading.

You've touched on an interesting point that goes beyond clothes. It's long bothered me that Invading Aliens are portrayed as savage and bestial, even though they're technologically superior to us. In the more-faithful Carpenter remake of The Thing and the recent prequel, the shape-shifting alien is damned unsociable, despite being able to fly a flying saucer (Even if you argue that it shape-shifted and stole the saucer, it was still intelligent enough to fly it). A lot of other films, comics, and so forth have the same problem. It's gotten so that there's developed a meme to satisfy the paradox of bestial naked invaders with super-tecyhnology -- the inhabitants of the ship are really from an extraterrestrial circus or zoo, and Everything Gets Set Right when we finally help the Zookeeper (who's also nude) round them up. This one's been used in a few movies and comic books.


Ultimately, I think it's for several reasons:

a.) If an alien IS really humanoid, you don't show them naked, not only because it looks silly and would get you in trouble for nudity, but because we won't viscerally BUY a naked human. It looks wrong.
b.) The filmmmakers want us to see and appreciate the alien's shapes. It not only satisfies their want to show upp their model-making or animation or CGI effects, we can appreciate the body design.
c.) we don't really need to see clothes on a non-human form. It doesn't call out the same sense of wrongness as a naked human
d.) It empkasizes the alien-ness by not having them wear clothes,


By the way, the aliens in Independence Day were wrapped in those skin-like armore things, which seems as much like clothes as the "solidified electricity" suits the guys in Earth vs. the Flying Saucers wore.
I like your answers. Mars Attacks is the only "modern" (i.e. not 50's Red Scare sci fi) film I can think of off the top of my head where the invaders are clothed. And even that is a comedic homage to their '50s counterparts.

And see my response to the Independence Day aliens above.
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  #7  
Old 05-24-2013, 12:35 PM
solost solost is offline
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"Signs" was by far the most ridculous example of this.

SPOILER:

Water is like acid to them and they invade a planet that's mostly covered in water with no protective gear whatsoever? Any humidity in the air alone would have been extremely damaging to them I would think, let alone if they got caught in a spring shower while lurking around outside.
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  #8  
Old 05-24-2013, 12:47 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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I think you are largely correct. The aliens that we see clothed are being presented as "people", often normal social interactions we experience daily recast in an SF setting. The aliens presented without clothing are largely being presented as "monsters", beasts attacking from the sky. They are essentially the Boogy Man*, the thing under the bed, the "Monsters Be Here" on maps, a material incarnation of the subconscious fears.

-----
*Funny thing, most people apparently spell this "Bogey Man", but I've always heard it pronounced "Boogy Man". But spelling it that way brings to mind some guy in a leisure suit whipping out the Saturday Night Fever moves. "Look out, the Boogy Man is gonna get you!"
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  #9  
Old 05-24-2013, 12:57 PM
Lamia Lamia is offline
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I vaguely remember a late '80s/early '90s alien movie (maybe Fire in the Sky?) featuring the "grey" type aliens where a human abductee discovered that their smooth pale skin and big eyes were actually bodysuits with close-fitting helmets with large black lenses. Without their spacesuits, the aliens were pink and gross looking.
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  #10  
Old 05-24-2013, 01:07 PM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is online now
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Let's not forget the alien invaders in THE AVENGERS -- one of whom memorably rips off his facial covering to yell at the puny humans on the ground, solely to cue the Hulk bellowing back in the famous shot that pans around a circle of our back-to-back heroes readying their weapons.
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  #11  
Old 05-24-2013, 02:39 PM
Victor Charlie Victor Charlie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solost View Post
"Signs" was by far the most ridculous example of this.

SPOILER:

Water is like acid to them and they invade a planet that's mostly covered in water with no protective gear whatsoever? Any humidity in the air alone would have been extremely damaging to them I would think, let alone if they got caught in a spring shower while lurking around outside.
That is only the beginning of the inanity of that film. Consider: (I won't even hide these spoilers. If you haven't seen the movie then I'm doing you a favor by "ruining" it for you.)

-A physically superior alien being can't kick his way out of a common pantry, something any modestly adept human over the age of 13 could do in short order.

-A humanoid life-form is threatened by water instead of being dependent on it. When considering the viability of a planet to support life, the existence of water is the FIRST thing we look for.

-Killing an alien with a bat requires the specialized skill of a professional baseball player. No ordinary person could bash in a skull with a club made from hardwood.

-Leaving glasses of water randomly around the house is a disorder that actually exists, as opposed to being a really crappy plot device.

Last edited by Victor Charlie; 05-24-2013 at 02:41 PM..
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  #12  
Old 05-24-2013, 03:08 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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Perhaps they're intending to shop in Paris or New York?
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Old 05-24-2013, 03:27 PM
Lightray Lightray is offline
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Because, although from the human POV the movie you're watching is a sci-fi/horror/kids movie... from an alien POV they're all low-budget pornos.

When ET's finger lights up, interpret that as "penis ensues".
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  #14  
Old 05-24-2013, 03:35 PM
TBG TBG is offline
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To show that the aliens are godless heathens, like all nudists.
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  #15  
Old 05-24-2013, 03:38 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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I always figured they were just nasty little bastards.

Last edited by billfish678; 05-24-2013 at 03:39 PM..
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  #16  
Old 05-24-2013, 03:38 PM
Der Trihs Der Trihs is offline
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My favorite fan theory about the Signs aliens is that they were actually alien criminals being executed by being dropped naked on the Acid Planet of the Acid People.
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  #17  
Old 05-24-2013, 03:43 PM
harmonicamoon harmonicamoon is offline
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Its obvious. If they don't have thumbs, they can't make them.
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Old 05-24-2013, 05:12 PM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is offline
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As I've said many times in the past, the aliens in "Signs" aren't really aliens. They're Bogey-Men. They hide under beds and behind doors, they creep around upstairs when you're downstairs, they run around outside when you're inside.

"But", I hear you objecting, "They fly around in flying saucers! They're from space! That makes them aliens!"

Wrong. They may come from space, but that doesn't make them aliens, it makes them bogey-men from space.

And they are vulnerable to water for the same reason the wicked witch of the west was vulnerable to water. Or Mister Myxlplyx is vulnerable to saying his name backwards. Or the Nome King is vulnerable to eggs. Invulnerable fairy tale creatures are vulnerable to some random thing X that the protagonist has on hand, purely by chance.
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Old 05-24-2013, 05:17 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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Thank you, Lemur, for actually understanding the movie instead of snarking on it.

Signs is not about an alien invasion, or aliens for that matter. It's a movie about belief, fear, and faith and the aliens are only a McGuffin and not important in the slightest other than a method of exploring other things.
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  #20  
Old 05-24-2013, 05:56 PM
NDP NDP is offline
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Originally Posted by Lemur866 View Post
As I've said many times in the past, the aliens in "Signs" aren't really aliens. They're Bogey-Men. They hide under beds and behind doors, they creep around upstairs when you're downstairs, they run around outside when you're inside.

"But", I hear you objecting, "They fly around in flying saucers! They're from space! That makes them aliens!"

Wrong. They may come from space, but that doesn't make them aliens, it makes them bogey-men from space.
Incidentally, in Signs did they ever show the aliens' spaceships or even expressly indicate they were using any?
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Old 05-24-2013, 06:02 PM
msmith537 msmith537 is offline
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Originally Posted by Victor Charlie View Post
... "Men in Black", "...
The 'Bug' in Men in Black wore an "Edgar Suit". Actually most of the aliens wore clothes or human disguises.



But yeah. Invading aliens always seem to take the form of some sort of space chimpanzee / lizard hybrid. They have advanced interstellar technology, but their "language" is a bunch of indecipherable grunts and screeches and they will tear you apart with their monster claws.

For that matter, why are some alien races like the Klingons still using medieval swords as anything but ceremonial weapons? Really? The "bat'leth" pizza cutter sword is a viable weapon on a battlefield with phasers and orbital photon torpedo bombardments?

I realize the Jedi light saber is a cool high tech weapon from a "more civilized age". But it still has the range of a sword.
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Old 05-24-2013, 06:03 PM
msmith537 msmith537 is offline
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
Thank you, Lemur, for actually understanding the movie instead of snarking on it.

Signs is not about an alien invasion, or aliens for that matter. It's a movie about belief, fear, and faith and the aliens are only a McGuffin and not important in the slightest other than a method of exploring other things.
I still don't get what the lesson was supposed to be.
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  #23  
Old 05-24-2013, 06:08 PM
Ethilrist Ethilrist is offline
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I think they're just allergic to synthetics, and they're here for some wool or cotton clothes.
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  #24  
Old 05-24-2013, 07:34 PM
OtisCampbellWasRight OtisCampbellWasRight is offline
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Simple answer: they are into "probing." They want you to see what's coming
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Old 05-24-2013, 08:12 PM
Der Trihs Der Trihs is offline
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
Thank you, Lemur, for actually understanding the movie instead of snarking on it.

Signs is not about an alien invasion, or aliens for that matter. It's a movie about belief, fear, and faith and the aliens are only a McGuffin and not important in the slightest other than a method of exploring other things.
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I still don't get what the lesson was supposed to be.
"Don't bathe or you'll melt like the Wicked Witch of the West".
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  #26  
Old 05-25-2013, 01:00 AM
Jormungandr Jormungandr is offline
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From "Stargate Atlantis- The Intruder" Hermoid is Asgard.

(Sheppard stares at Hermiod suspiciously)
McKay: Don't stare. He hates it when people stare.
Sheppard: (whispers) Am I the only one who thinks it's strange we're working with an alien?
McKay: Intergalactic hyper drive technology is kind of new to us, so we need his help.
Sheppard: Is he supposed to be naked like that?


According to the Stargate wiki:

After Lt. Colonel John Sheppard says "Is he supposed to be naked like that," Hermiod says something in his native tongue. When played backwards, Hermiod says "These humans are infants."

So, I guess they evolved from clothes.
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  #27  
Old 05-25-2013, 01:15 AM
eschereal eschereal is online now
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Paul wears trouser-looking things but is bare chested. Probably a habit he picked up from being on earth for so long. Really, if you spend a lot of time in a spaceship, clothing would be more of a problem. You get fibers in the air, and it gets stinky and eventually wears out, much easier to just keep it in a trunk, for just-in-case. The only thing a space traveller really needs is a towel.
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Old 05-25-2013, 02:20 AM
appleciders appleciders is offline
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Originally Posted by solost View Post
"Signs" was by far the most ridculous example of this.

SPOILER:

Water is like acid to them and they invade a planet that's mostly covered in water with no protective gear whatsoever? Any humidity in the air alone would have been extremely damaging to them I would think, let alone if they got caught in a spring shower while lurking around outside.
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Originally Posted by msmith537 View Post
I still don't get what the lesson was supposed to be.
Signs is a profession of faith, a statement of the existence of a God who has a divine plan for everyone. Thematically, it's got more in common with A Prayer For Owen Meany than Star Wars. Signs is terrible science fiction, and only mediocre horror. It's not bad as a sort of spiritual cinema, if you happen to be in agreement with its particular theological worldview.
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  #29  
Old 05-25-2013, 03:45 AM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is offline
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Paul wears trouser-looking things but is bare chested. Probably a habit he picked up from being on earth for so long. Really, if you spend a lot of time in a spaceship, clothing would be more of a problem. You get fibers in the air, and it gets stinky and eventually wears out, much easier to just keep it in a trunk, for just-in-case. The only thing a space traveller really needs is a towel.
Well the crew of his rescue vessel were also fully clothed. And unlike the usual imagine of Greys Paul's species do have external genitalia. Very prominent external genitalia.
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  #30  
Old 05-25-2013, 11:04 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Was it Strange Invaders (1983) that had an alien in a leisure suit?
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  #31  
Old 05-25-2013, 03:54 PM
Disposable Hero Disposable Hero is offline
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Like the aliens in Independence Day the invading aliens in Battleship wore combat-armour (and I thought were pretty cool and creepy)

And I have to say that despite all the negative vibes directed towards those movies I liked and enjoyed watching both of them, I also liked Signs and even Skyline had its moments (no clothes-wearing aliens in that one either).

In fact the most generally popular alien invasion movie of recent times Battle: Los Angeles was the one I liked the least. And I'm not just being thran (good word, look it up, slip it casually into your next conversation).
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Old 05-25-2013, 04:13 PM
Ethilrist Ethilrist is offline
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Do you have any idea how hard it is to get laser-burns out of frobnatz-cloth? And don't even talk to me about the iron-based-bloodstains...
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  #33  
Old 05-26-2013, 02:04 AM
Victor Charlie Victor Charlie is offline
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
Thank you, Lemur, for actually understanding the movie instead of snarking on it.

Signs is not about an alien invasion, or aliens for that matter. It's a movie about belief, fear, and faith and the aliens are only a McGuffin and not important in the slightest other than a method of exploring other things.
Most science fiction stories are parables about various aspects of belief and behavior. That doesn't change the fact that the McGuffin/antagonist/plot device in Signs is a water-susceptible alien sent to a water planet with no clothing. That's just dumb and contrived.
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Old 05-26-2013, 02:26 AM
Victor Charlie Victor Charlie is offline
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Incidentally, in Signs did they ever show the aliens' spaceships or even expressly indicate they were using any?
If memory serves, the crop circles (the "signs") are landing sites for the alien ships.
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Old 05-26-2013, 04:45 AM
Disposable Hero Disposable Hero is offline
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If memory serves, the crop circles (the "signs") are landing sites for the alien ships.
There's also a short news report of a bird being killed as it flies into a cloaked alien ship above a city...also if I recall correctly.
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  #36  
Old 05-27-2013, 10:14 AM
msmith537 msmith537 is offline
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Was it Strange Invaders (1983) that had an alien in a leisure suit?
I don't recall specifically. You might be thinking of Buckaroo Banzai where the aliens all wore cheap business suits and had the first name "John".

The "men in black" style of alien is also pretty common in fiction. Not suit-wearing human agents like Men in Black the movie. Aliens that sort of look human and wear human clothing, but there is something weird and "off" about their mannerisms. Or they just look like a weird alien in a suit.

I guess the idea is to create a sort of "uncanny valley" effect where the aliens seem so much more alien by their inability to pass themselves off as human.
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  #37  
Old 05-27-2013, 10:24 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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I don't recall specifically. You might be thinking of Buckaroo Banzai where the aliens all wore cheap business suits and had the first name "John".
It's not Backaroo Banzai. I think it was a scene in Strange Invaders where the Alien Overlord wearing a leisure suit appeared on a large screen, addressing aliens who have taken on the identities of townspeople. I'm almost sure of it, but I haven't seen the film in years, and I haven't checked to see if I have it.
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Old 06-30-2013, 09:14 PM
BAHZONE BAHZONE is offline
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Why do invading aliens never wear clothes?

b.) The filmmmakers want us to see and appreciate the alien's shapes. It not only satisfies their want to show upp their model-making or animation or CGI effects, we can appreciate the body design.

I have also pondered the question why movie aliens are always naked.

All the aliens we are familiar with in movies, TV Shows, literature etc are ultimately figments of someones imagination (even witness accounts of actual alien sitings are derived from speculation). It's not enough to just see an alien head. Sometimes, the artist also wants to promote the physiology of their creation. I believe that is also why the human nude is so prevalent in fine art.
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  #39  
Old 06-30-2013, 09:53 PM
Shawn1767 Shawn1767 is offline
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Why don't we ask why do humans wear clothes? Because we have a variety of environments to be comfortable in. Animals don't wear clothes. Why? Because their bodies are adapted to whatever environment they are living in. Perhaps aliens don't need to wear clothes because the environment doesn't affect them the way it does us. Imagine the savings in resources if we had no need for clothing.
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  #40  
Old 07-01-2013, 04:48 AM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
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What was that recent movie where the aliens wore what looked like old-style diving suits? Their helmets were illuminated inside-the looked vaguely pinkish?
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  #41  
Old 07-01-2013, 07:49 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Imagine the savings in resources if we had no need for clothing.
Imagine the negative economic impact. It would be as bad as if everyone wore a white suit.
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  #42  
Old 07-01-2013, 08:15 AM
Love Rhombus Love Rhombus is offline
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What was that recent movie where the aliens wore what looked like old-style diving suits? Their helmets were illuminated inside-the looked vaguely pinkish?

Maybe you're cross-referencing Bioshock? Unless you mean the guy from Robot Monster?

And re: The Thing. Perhaps it didn't fly the ship here. Maybe it was a passenger/stowaway/cargo?
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  #43  
Old 07-01-2013, 02:25 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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I'll say what I said before: there are essentially two types of aliens in movies.

1. Alien people who are invading/trading/interacting/observing us. These aliens are acting like we expect people to, with similar motivations. They may be peaceful aliens in an interactive multicultural society, they may be vengeful aliens trying to get retribution for some perceived wrong, they may be crafty aliens out for our land and water and women. They may even be aliens trying to fit in as humans - shown to be aliens by how they stand out, not quite fit.

2. Alien monsters that are attacking us because that's what monsters do. They may be defending their own territory or transplanted here to wipe us out or figments of our imagination come real, the point is they are monsters and are presented as such. They're essentially wild animals.

Look at the aliens from Alien and Aliens. They're presented as smart enough to hunt down and beat humans, but they're largely treated as beasts that want to rape and eat us. Ergo, no clothing, no artificial weapons, no real language.

Conversely, look at the Predators. They are advanced aliens from a distant society hunting us for sport. They wear armor and use technology like weapons, space ships, camoflage suits, etc. At first we're presented with the mysterious beast, but it becomes clear through the conflict as the plot of the first movie reveals the beasts are in fact space people who view us as beasts.

Being able to show off their CGI skills and artistic rendering and creative anatomy is secondary to the story they wish to tell: is it "strange people" or "monsters"?
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Old 07-01-2013, 04:46 PM
Gangster Octopus Gangster Octopus is offline
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What's interesting is when the movie/show is about an alien invasion they do not seem to be even wearing any military gear...except Predator.

Speaking of military gear, what exactly does the stormtroopers "armor" protect them from?
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Old 07-01-2013, 06:22 PM
Lust4Life Lust4Life is offline
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Star Trek is "Fluffy", they don't want to upset an audience that has a quite large proportion of regular viewers who dislike anything that might upset them intellectually.
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Old 07-02-2013, 01:33 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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Originally Posted by Gangster Octopus View Post
Speaking of military gear, what exactly does the stormtroopers "armor" protect them from?
Apparently being humiliated. Or recognized.
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Old 07-02-2013, 01:39 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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Originally Posted by Lust4Life View Post
Star Trek is "Fluffy", they don't want to upset an audience that has a quite large proportion of regular viewers who dislike anything that might upset them intellectually.


Star Trek TOS actually had a lot of creative aliens. Gorn. Gas clouds. The Horta. The salt monster. Now some of them look like a guy in a rubber suit, but they did try to make more than just people with nose ridges.

That stereotype is actually a Next Gen event. TOS made human-looking aliens just look like humans, Next Gen tried to make them look somewhat alien while essentially being humans. The simple/cheap option for making new aliens is face paint and a small facial appliance. Ergo, the nose ridges, eyebrow ridges, ears, etc that populate that incarnation.
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Old 07-04-2013, 07:28 AM
si_blakely si_blakely is offline
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Originally Posted by msmith537 View Post
I realize the Jedi light saber is a cool high tech weapon from a "more civilized age". But it still has the range of a sword.
A good force throw extends that out to 10 or so metres - just don't fumble the catch.
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Old 07-04-2013, 10:44 AM
msmith537 msmith537 is offline
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I'll say what I said before: there are essentially two types of aliens in movies.

1. Alien people who are invading/trading/interacting/observing us. These aliens are acting like we expect people to, with similar motivations. They may be peaceful aliens in an interactive multicultural society, they may be vengeful aliens trying to get retribution for some perceived wrong, they may be crafty aliens out for our land and water and women. They may even be aliens trying to fit in as humans - shown to be aliens by how they stand out, not quite fit.

2. Alien monsters that are attacking us because that's what monsters do. They may be defending their own territory or transplanted here to wipe us out or figments of our imagination come real, the point is they are monsters and are presented as such. They're essentially wild animals..
There are also three types of alien encounters:
1) Infiltration - Aliens using disguises, psychic powers, mind control, assimilation, clones or avatar-like artificial bodies embed themselves in human society. Often, but not always, at the highest levels. Examples include X-Files, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Thing, and so on.

2) Zerg rush - Basically swarms of your alien monsters attacking like a hoard of locust. Examples include Starship Troopers, Aliens,

The Third Kind) - The show up and hover about in a giant spaceship, often a couple thousand feet over major cities. They may or may not fire some sort of death ray or unleash a Zerg swarm of tiny fighters. Independence Day, V, District 9, Close Encounters of the Third Kind.
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Old 07-04-2013, 11:59 AM
Smapti Smapti is offline
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At no point in Signs is there ever given any factual confirmation that the invaders are extraterrestrials. Everything we hear is the beliefs of the characters; that the crop circles are their landing strips, that there are invisible flying saucers above their cities, etc. It's all speculation.

In reality, the "aliens" are the same entities that would have been called "fairies" a few hundred years earlier, and "demons" a few hundred years before that. They're agents of destruction, employed by God a la the book of Job, to teach Mel Gibson a lesson about the inscrutable nature of the Divine Plan. The "alien" in the climax doesn't die because it's come in contact with water; it dies because it's come in contact with holy water, sanctified by Hess' new-found faith.

And geez, I'm tired of having to say that every time a thread about sci-fi clichés pops up and someone says "The aliens in Signs run around naked and they're allergic to water!"
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