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  #1  
Old 07-12-2013, 11:27 PM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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Medieval bullcrap words in Words with Friends (scrabble)

So the wife and I enjoy spending time together, generally mealtimes, playing Words with Friends with varying online adversaries. (Words, with Friends, in case you are unfamiliar with it, is an online form of Scrabble.)

Like Scrabble, Words with Friends has a source of words that are acceptable, a built-in dictionary I suppose. What I've noticed is that the dictionary accepts a lot of Old English and Middle English words that I have never used, or heard anyone else use, or read in any book. Words like "smeek," "abye" and "vrouw" to name a few. Words that make sense only if you are an English Lit. major who dug hard into the original Old English Pilgrim's Progress and Chaucer.

There are a lot of neologisms and slang words that Words With Friends will NOT allow, like zerg and nerf, and these are words that are in common usage with a lot of people. If you can't allow neologisms that have been around for a decade, but DO allow terms from the Middle Ages, seems ... funky.

Look, I'm not complaining about words that I'm not familiar with, like dossel (which I now understand to be something you hang in a chancery) or "za" which is slang for "pizza" (though why this neologism and not the others?) or qi or jo or xi which I understand to be a "Scrabble words" that nobody uses but hey, worth points, you know?

But what is it with all the medieval bullshit? I can't see why these terms are acceptable Scrabble terms. Anyone know why?

Is it that English speaking scrabble players in Scotland or Ireland or Wales still use these words? It's the only explanation I can come up with. Any of our friends from across the pond got any input here? Do you take "smeek" breaks? Do you like to go out with the little vrouw?
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  #2  
Old 07-12-2013, 11:37 PM
Giles Giles is online now
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"Vrouw" is a Dutch word, not Middle English, and if it's used in English at all it's a recent borrowing from Dutch to mean "Dutch woman".
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Old 07-13-2013, 12:20 AM
Joey P Joey P is offline
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A few days ago my mom played deil and something else about as odd as that that I can't remember off the top of my head. That told me she gave up her 'no cheating' rule and starting using my sisters' trick of just sliding letters into place and hitting send to see what works.

Last edited by Joey P; 07-13-2013 at 12:20 AM..
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Old 07-13-2013, 12:38 AM
Yorikke Yorikke is offline
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You have to look at them not as words, but strings of letters that signify points. I play tons and tons of words that I only know from smartphone word games. I blow away people in real life who only play tabletop - on the phone, it's so easy to learn so much so quickly, because it's casual. It can be an ordeal to play tabletop Scrabble, but right now, I have about two dozen word games going simultaneously.

Last edited by Yorikke; 07-13-2013 at 12:39 AM..
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  #5  
Old 07-13-2013, 08:54 AM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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Originally Posted by Joey P View Post
A few days ago my mom played deil and something else about as odd as that that I can't remember off the top of my head. That told me she gave up her 'no cheating' rule and starting using my sisters' trick of just sliding letters into place and hitting send to see what works.
We do that form of "cheating" too in the sense we put up things that SEEM like they might be words and see if they go through. Mostly they don't, but we've been surprised many times ... "THAT'S a word?"
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  #6  
Old 07-13-2013, 08:56 AM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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Originally Posted by Yorikke View Post
You have to look at them not as words, but strings of letters that signify points. I play tons and tons of words that I only know from smartphone word games. I blow away people in real life who only play tabletop - on the phone, it's so easy to learn so much so quickly, because it's casual. It can be an ordeal to play tabletop Scrabble, but right now, I have about two dozen word games going simultaneously.
Yeah, when we go out to eat, we bring our Ipad and play. Adds a lot to the dining experience. We run maybe a dozen games at a time ourselves. Just makes it hella more convenient.
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  #7  
Old 07-13-2013, 05:29 PM
MaxTheVool MaxTheVool is offline
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Originally Posted by Evil Captor View Post
qi or jo or xi which I understand to be a "Scrabble words" that nobody uses but hey, worth points, you know?
"Xi" is a letter of the greek alphabet, so it's only slightly more obscure than "pi". So certainly not up there with something like "oe" as far as being a "scrabble word" is concerned.

(Now of course I expect someone to post about how often they hear and talk about an "oe" in everyday life.)
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Old 07-13-2013, 09:28 PM
Justin_Bailey Justin_Bailey is offline
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Originally Posted by Evil Captor View Post
There are a lot of neologisms and slang words that Words With Friends will NOT allow, like zerg and nerf, and these are words that are in common usage with a lot of people. If you can't allow neologisms that have been around for a decade, but DO allow terms from the Middle Ages, seems ... funky.
"Zerg" and "Nerf" are both technically proper nouns. It'll be many years before they move into the realm of just words.
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Old 07-13-2013, 09:57 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Giles View Post
"Vrouw" is a Dutch word, not Middle English, and if it's used in English at all it's a recent borrowing from Dutch to mean "Dutch woman".
Also, Chaucer is not Old English, it's Middle English, as is The Pilgrim's Progress. Middle English still looks like English, but with funny spellings/pronunciations and some strange vocabulary. Old English, meanwhile, looks like a foreign language.

Compare:

Quote:
WHAN that Aprille with his shoures soote
The droghte of Marche hath perced to the roote,
And bathed every veyne in swich licour,
Of which vertu engendred is the flour;
(Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, Middle English)

vs:

Quote:
HwŠt! We Gardena in geardagum,
■eodcyninga, ■rym gefrunon,
hu ­a Š■elingas ellen fremedon.
Oft Scyld Scefing scea■ena ■reatum,
(Unknown, Beowulf, Old English.)

Carry on with the rest of the discussion. I just wanted to clarify the difference between Old and Middle English, as it seems to come up a lot.

Last edited by pulykamell; 07-13-2013 at 09:59 PM..
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  #10  
Old 07-13-2013, 10:02 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Justin_Bailey View Post
"Zerg" and "Nerf" are both technically proper nouns. It'll be many years before they move into the realm of just words.
I have no clue what "zerg" could even possibly mean. Is this a common word?
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  #11  
Old 07-13-2013, 10:29 PM
Tamerlane Tamerlane is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
I have no clue what "zerg" could even possibly mean. Is this a common word?
Only if you are a gamer, really. zerg.

ETA: And mostly if you're a specific sort of gamer. I know the word, but never use it myself in pretty much any context. I've mostly long since lost my taste for RTS games, confirmed when I couldn't get past an hour of Starcraft II without getting bored.

Last edited by Tamerlane; 07-13-2013 at 10:33 PM..
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  #12  
Old 07-13-2013, 11:34 PM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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Originally Posted by Tamerlane View Post
Only if you are a gamer, really. zerg.

ETA: And mostly if you're a specific sort of gamer. I know the word, but never use it myself in pretty much any context. I've mostly long since lost my taste for RTS games, confirmed when I couldn't get past an hour of Starcraft II without getting bored.
If you mean MMO gamers in general, maybe. I learned about it in SL Gor, where it means using mass bows to attack an enemy in overwhelming numbers to ensure a win. Not a popular tactic.
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  #13  
Old 07-13-2013, 11:46 PM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Also, Chaucer is not Old English, it's Middle English, as is The Pilgrim's Progress. Middle English still looks like English, but with funny spellings/pronunciations and some strange vocabulary. Old English, meanwhile, looks like a foreign language.

Compare:



(Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, Middle English)

vs:



(Unknown, Beowulf, Old English.)

Carry on with the rest of the discussion. I just wanted to clarify the difference between Old and Middle English, as it seems to come up a lot.
Middle English is certainly obscure enough all by its lonesome. It just occupies a special area of "lame" in terms of reasonableness as being a scrabble word source. Nobody uses these words. Now I'm not saying a word has to be in common usage to be acceptable. Specialist terms that SOMEBODY uses regularly, like "xylem" and "phloem" used by botanists, or "fibrocyst" used in medicine or "zymurgy" used by chemists, are just fine by me. But who the fuck uses the Middle English words any more?
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Old 07-14-2013, 12:06 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Evil Captor View Post
Middle English is certainly obscure enough all by its lonesome. It just occupies a special area of "lame" in terms of reasonableness as being a scrabble word source. Nobody uses these words. Now I'm not saying a word has to be in common usage to be acceptable. Specialist terms that SOMEBODY uses regularly, like "xylem" and "phloem" used by botanists, or "fibrocyst" used in medicine or "zymurgy" used by chemists, are just fine by me. But who the fuck uses the Middle English words any more?
I'm actually neither here nor there in terms of this argument. Is Middle English obscure enough to be a source for Scrabble words? Probably. If those words aren't used contemporaneously, I would agree. But my post was just to clarify the difference between Old and Middle English. That's the split where English really takes a turn.
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Old 07-14-2013, 12:09 AM
Little Plastic Ninja Little Plastic Ninja is offline
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Originally Posted by Evil Captor View Post
Middle English is certainly obscure enough all by its lonesome. It just occupies a special area of "lame" in terms of reasonableness as being a scrabble word source. Nobody uses these words. Now I'm not saying a word has to be in common usage to be acceptable. Specialist terms that SOMEBODY uses regularly, like "xylem" and "phloem" used by botanists, or "fibrocyst" used in medicine or "zymurgy" used by chemists, are just fine by me. But who the fuck uses the Middle English words any more?
Medieval history and literature scholars?
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Old 07-14-2013, 12:13 AM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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Originally Posted by Little Plastic Ninja View Post
Medieval history and literature scholars?
If that were grounds for inclusion in Scrabble, then I suppose that any foreign language's words could be used, after all, we have scholars who study just about every language.
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Old 07-14-2013, 12:24 AM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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WWF wouldn't let me use "pugil", as in pugil stick, the padded staff used in military martial arts training. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pugil_stick
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  #18  
Old 07-14-2013, 09:30 AM
Lightnin' Lightnin' is offline
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"Zerg" and "Nerf" are both technically proper nouns. It'll be many years before they move into the realm of just words.
Nah, they're both verbs.

Zerg:

To assure ones victory using overwhelming numbers.

To greatly outnumber the enemy, and swarm them.

To trivialize en encounter using mass numbers of allies rather then skill


Nerf:

To make worse or weaken, usually in the context of weakening something in order to balance out a game.
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  #19  
Old 07-14-2013, 09:38 AM
Justin_Bailey Justin_Bailey is offline
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Originally Posted by Lightnin' View Post
Nah, they're both verbs.
Not in common usage. In common usage they are still connected to the original nouns they sprang from (an alien race and a foam toy line, respectively). As slang, they've moved over into verbs, but Words With Friends (and Scrabble) does not accept niche slang words.

Like I said before, over time, both will surely be added. Nerf especially, as that one has even moved beyond gamer circles.
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Old 07-14-2013, 11:51 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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Originally Posted by Evil Captor View Post
..."zymurgy" used by chemists, are just fine by me. But who the fuck uses the Middle English words any more?
Fuck, I'm a chemical engineer (ok, I haven't really worked as a chemist in a decade) and I swear it's the first time I encounter that word.
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  #21  
Old 07-14-2013, 01:32 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Not in common usage. In common usage they are still connected to the original nouns they sprang from (an alien race and a foam toy line, respectively).
The exact same demographic that's even aware of the "common usage" of 'zerg' also uses 'nerf' almost exclusively in its verb form. It wouldn't even be remarkable to see them used in those sentences in the same sentence: "Man, that latest Heart of the Swarm patch totally nerfed the Zerg".
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Old 07-14-2013, 06:18 PM
42fish 42fish is offline
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Originally Posted by Evil Captor View Post
But what is it with all the medieval bullshit? I can't see why these terms are acceptable Scrabble terms. Anyone know why?
A word is acceptable for the Scrabble Official Word List if it appears in at least one of the following five dictionaries: Funk & Wagnall's Standard College Dictionary, Merriam-Webster's College Dictionary, The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Webster's New World Dictionary, and The Random House College Dictionary. (Source: Word Freak, pg. 143)

So clearly, you need to contact the editors at Funk & Wagnal's et al and demand that they remove 'vrouw' et al. (Although that still might not help. 'Al' [an East Indian tree] was in the Random House Dictionary when the first Scrabble dictionary was published in 1978. Random House has since dropped the word, but it lives on in the Scrabble dictionary through inertia.)
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  #23  
Old 07-14-2013, 08:01 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Fuck, I'm a chemical engineer (ok, I haven't really worked as a chemist in a decade) and I swear it's the first time I encounter that word.
It's probably more well-known around homebrewing circles. I don't really think of it as a "chemist" word so much as a "lover of alcoholic beverages" word. That is, the people I know who know that word are not the scientific set, but everyday joes and janes with a particular hobby.

Last edited by pulykamell; 07-14-2013 at 08:01 PM..
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Old 07-15-2013, 10:54 AM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is offline
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
The exact same demographic that's even aware of the "common usage" of 'zerg' also uses 'nerf' almost exclusively in its verb form. It wouldn't even be remarkable to see them used in those sentences in the same sentence: "Man, that latest Heart of the Swarm patch totally nerfed the Zerg".
But that's using "Zerg" as a proper noun, to refer to the collection of alien monsters that compose The Swarm.

To really use it, you'd have to use "zerg" as a noun. "When they nerfed the plasma cannon upgrade on the Raptors you can't zerg with them any more."
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Old 07-15-2013, 11:01 AM
aNewLeaf aNewLeaf is offline
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That is, the people I know who know that word are not the scientific set, but everyday joes and janes with a particular hobby.
Yeah, I was going to say I knew the word because I practice the hobby.
But there's lots of words like that- 'zygodactyl' describes the arrangement of toes on the feet of some birds.
I don't think I'll ever be able to play it, but I'm ready if the time ever comes.
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  #26  
Old 07-15-2013, 05:08 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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But that's using "Zerg" as a proper noun, to refer to the collection of alien monsters that compose The Swarm.

To really use it, you'd have to use "zerg" as a noun. "When they nerfed the plasma cannon upgrade on the Raptors you can't zerg with them any more."
My point was that it's a bit silly to compare the verb forms of those words to their "common usage", since the "common" usage of 'zerg' (the proper noun) is just as uncommon as the verb form of 'nerf'.
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Old 07-15-2013, 05:18 PM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
My point was that it's a bit silly to compare the verb forms of those words to their "common usage", since the "common" usage of 'zerg' (the proper noun) is just as uncommon as the verb form of 'nerf'.
My point was that there is an active community of gamers who use these terms, and they are hardly limited to one game. I have heard "nerfed" a lot in Mechwarrior, and I've heard "zerg" a lot (exclusively as a verb) in Second Life Gor. So there is a large community of gamers who use these terms, as opposed to the Middle English terms that are almost never used by anyone but scrabble players.
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Old 07-16-2013, 06:15 AM
BigT BigT is offline
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
My point was that it's a bit silly to compare the verb forms of those words to their "common usage", since the "common" usage of 'zerg' (the proper noun) is just as uncommon as the verb form of 'nerf'.
No, zerg is much more uncommon. I didn't even know that nerf was a video game term, as I'm pretty sure I learned it on the playground. "Zerg" (as a noun) apparently actually comes from a video game. "Nerf" predates video games. It seems unlikely that both would be just as common.

I'd be more inclined to think that "Nerf" was excluded to avoid the appearance of misusing a trademark, not because it is uncommon. The verb "google" is much more common, but I doubt it's in there, either.
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Old 07-16-2013, 08:40 AM
42fish 42fish is offline
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I'd be more inclined to think that "Nerf" was excluded to avoid the appearance of misusing a trademark, not because it is uncommon. The verb "google" is much more common, but I doubt it's in there, either.
The Scrabble Players Dictionary includes the verbs xerox and fedex, so they're clearly not above using words derived from trademarks. I won't be surprised if google makes the next (5th) edition of the dictionary.
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Old 07-16-2013, 08:51 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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I'm surprised at the inclusion of "fedex," as I've never heard it as a generic verb, and the Scrabble Player's Dictionary agrees, saying it means "to send by Federal Express." "Xerox," though, is used as a generic verb. I see that words like "kleenex" and "dumpster" aren't allowed, either, although those are used as generic nouns. Is the rationale that one can verb a trademarked noun and, if in common usage, even if the verb is specifically tied to the trademark, it's okay? Seems kind of odd to me. (ETA: Though I see "kleenex" and "dumpster" are allowed using the tournament list of words in SOWPODS or TWL.)

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  #31  
Old 07-16-2013, 08:55 AM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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Pilgrim's Progress was actually written in Modern English. True, parts of it may use words that are unfamiliar to us, but it's much easier to read than Chaucer, and I had to read both in college.
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Old 07-16-2013, 09:04 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Dendarii Dame View Post
Pilgrim's Progress was actually written in Modern English.
Of course, you are correct. Shakespeare is considered (Early) Modern English, and it predates The Pilgrim's Progress. So, to recap Beowulf -> Old English. Canterbury Tales -> Middle English. Shakespeare -> (Early) Modern English.
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Old 07-16-2013, 09:17 AM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Of course, you are correct. Shakespeare is considered (Early) Modern English, and it predates The Pilgrim's Progress. So, to recap Beowulf -> Old English. Canterbury Tales -> Middle English. Shakespeare -> (Early) Modern English.
Good point. I had conflated Canterbury Tales and Pilgrim's Progress. Which one had the old lady with the huge rack and "wee smackit parfits waere donne twae pluckt" -- you know, authentic Middle English gibberish?

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  #34  
Old 07-16-2013, 10:54 AM
Hoopy Frood Hoopy Frood is offline
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I've used nerf as a verb for a while now, and have heard others use it as well, and not just in the realms of video games. (E.g. In D&D 3.5, a common thing brought up was how Clerics got nerfed considerably from 3.0.)

Heck, I never even really thought about where the term came from until this thread. I always knew the origin in the back of my mind, but when using it I never thought about the actual foam weapon company. In my mind it was just a word meaning "significantly reduce the power of". Just like I don't think of Kimberly-Clark paper products when I ask for a Kleenex.
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Old 07-16-2013, 07:41 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Quoth BigT:

No, zerg is much more uncommon. I didn't even know that nerf was a video game term, as I'm pretty sure I learned it on the playground. "Zerg" (as a noun) apparently actually comes from a video game. "Nerf" predates video games. It seems unlikely that both would be just as common.
I must not be phrasing this well. The common usage of "Nerf" is a proper noun used as a trademark by a company that makes foam toys. This usage is used by the majority of Americans, of all subcultures. Among the gaming community, "nerf" also has a secondary meaning, to reduce the power of something, usually for the sake of game balance.

The most common usage that the word "Zerg" has is a proper noun for a specific race of aliens in the Starcraft video game series. This usage pretty much only shows up amongst gamers, specifically Starcraft players. Among certain segments of the gaming community, "zerg" also has a secondary meaning, to overwhelm an enemy through sheer weight of numbers (a tactic often used by said alien race).

Thus, my comment was that it was odd for Justin Bailey to compare the verb forms of those two words to their "common usage", since the so-called "common" usage of "zerg" is less common than the verb form of "nerf". If one were to argue that the noun form of the word "Zerg" (as opposed to the verb form) were common enough to appear in dictionaries, then one is also implying that the verb form of "nerf" ought also to be common enough for dictionaries.
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Old 07-16-2013, 07:57 PM
Justin_Bailey Justin_Bailey is offline
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Thus, my comment was that it was odd for Justin Bailey to compare the verb forms of those two words to their "common usage", since the so-called "common" usage of "zerg" is less common than the verb form of "nerf".
Huh? When did I do that? I said that Zerg and Nerf began their life as proper nouns and that, as far as the Scrabble/Words With Friends people are concerned, that is where both words still are in the common usage (meaning everybody, not gamer subcultures).

But since we're here, yes, I agree that it's only a matter of time the verb form of "nerf" is added to the dictionary and the "common usage."
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Old 07-17-2013, 05:32 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Except that "where 'zerg' is in the common usage" is "nowhere".
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Old 07-18-2013, 05:37 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Has anyone in the entire history of eating melted cheese on baked dough ever referred to a pizza as a "za"? I am rather dubious.
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Old 07-18-2013, 08:59 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
It's probably more well-known around homebrewing circles. I don't really think of it as a "chemist" word so much as a "lover of alcoholic beverages" word. That is, the people I know who know that word are not the scientific set, but everyday joes and janes with a particular hobby.
Exactly, it's neither a chemist's nor a oenologist's word... it's a hobby brewer's word.

Last edited by Nava; 07-18-2013 at 08:59 AM..
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Old 07-18-2013, 09:20 AM
Justin_Bailey Justin_Bailey is offline
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Has anyone in the entire history of eating melted cheese on baked dough ever referred to a pizza as a "za"? I am rather dubious.
I've seen it on a sign outside of a pizza place. Once. In the south. So I'm not sure what I ate actually counts as "pizza" or "melted cheese on baked dough."
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Old 07-18-2013, 09:44 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
Has anyone in the entire history of eating melted cheese on baked dough ever referred to a pizza as a "za"? I am rather dubious.
My brother and I use it, although with a touch of jocularity. That said, yes, I've heard it used without any trace of irony.

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Originally Posted by Nava View Post
Exactly, it's neither a chemist's nor a oenologist's word... it's a hobby brewer's word.
I would think an oenologist would be familiar with it, though. Chemists in general, probably not so much.

Last edited by pulykamell; 07-18-2013 at 09:48 AM..
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  #42  
Old 07-18-2013, 09:58 AM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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I could see "nerf" getting into wider usage very easily:
"That bill to regulate CDOs had some teeth, but the banking lobby totally nerfed it."

"Bah, now that prisoners are getting ketchup on their prison loaf and heated prisons in winter, the prison experience has been nerfed."

"Now that football helmets are lined with foam on the outside as well as the inside, the whole tackling thing is nerfed."
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Old 07-18-2013, 04:08 PM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is offline
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"Now that psychiatric hospitals have rooms covered with padding for violent patients, getting thrown in the booby-hatch has been nerfed!"

"Since they added bumpers that absorb the force of collisions between vehicles, car crashes have been nerfed!"

"Since they coated kindergardeners with spongy foam rubber before letting them outside, recess has been nerfed!"
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:44 PM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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Inflation has really nerfed the dollar.

Progressives are always trying to nerf the power of money in politics, claiming that it is OP and gives rich people the ability to zerg the hell out of the poor.

Tide nerfs the living shit out of germs and stains!

Ok, "nerf" totally needs to be mainstreamed.
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Old 07-19-2013, 02:12 PM
OffByOne OffByOne is offline
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I am a tournament Scrabble (R) player, have been for many years, and I have heard all the arguments about the OSPD (Official Scrabble(R) Player's Dictionary and OTaCWL (Offical Tournament and Club Word List, often referred simply as TWL or OWL).

First, I'd like to point out that Funk & Wagnells is no more. It was used for OSPD1, possibly 2. When OSPD3 was introduced, it had been expurgated, removing words such as "fuck" and "jew," while leaving in really offensive words such as "war" and "hate."

The players of the National Scrabble Association demanded to be able to play with "their" words, so the TWL was produced that included the expurgated words.

The notion that a word in the Scrabble (R) dictionary is there to stay is incorrect. "DA," "AINE," and many others were removed in OSPD2. In 2004-5, when the new dictionary was being readied, the Yahoo! group CGP (Crossword Game Players) was inundated with people's favorite words to add and to delete. I know, however, of only one deletion in that edition, EMF, primarily because it is universally pronounced ee-em-eff. So, even though electrical engineers may use "emf" (non-capitalized) in writing, they still pronounce it as the abbreviation of electromotive force.

Nowadays, as OSPD5 and TWL3 are being prepared, I have heard some people requesting that multiple spellings be reduced to a single spelling. Fro instance, the word GANEF (thief) can also be spelled GANEV, GONIF, GONIPH, plus others that I know I missed.

That's all in the US, Canada, and Israel. The rest of the world plays Collins, so named for the dictionary maker that published the OSW (Official Scrabble Words), which replaced SOWPODS (OSW + OSPD), since that was the nickname given to the previous version, Chambers. (The reason OSPD is included in the SOWPODS acronym was that the Brits decided to combine the two dictionaries (OSW and OSPD) for world usage. Problem is, the US and Canada backed away from the deal.) At any rate, the Collins dictionary is a superset of TWL.

Players in the US or Canada that want to play internationally have two choices: play only Collins, or play Collins and TWL. Neither is a good choice, since playing Collins only will limit how many tournament games the player can play, since the overwhelming majority of tournaments are TWL only; the player that decides to play both word lists have to remember which words are Collins-only, so that they do not play them in TWL games.

(In one of the finals games played for the National Championship, one of the players, a Collins/TWL devotee, opened with a Collins-only word. His opponent, also a Collins/TWL player, let it go!)

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