36 loyal years of service and then death

When I was 6 months old my non-betting father was taken to the horse track by his older brother, he bet a quid on a race and won 50. Being the devoted hubby and new dad that he was, he decided to “spoil” my mum and buy her a tumble dryer so my bum could still have dry nappies in the wettest of months.
About 12 years ago, when I was preggers myself, Mum decided to buy a new dryer and donate the old one to to me (being as we were impoverished and all). The dryer dried my childs’ nappies spendidly and continued to keep on drying until 2 weeks ago when for no apparent reason I opened the doorand it fell off in my hand.
BUGGER said I, but with the determination of one who does not want to buy a new dryer (let alone afford one!) I found that a carefully rigged broomstick would hold the door on long enough to have the washing dry. Tonight however the dryer announced loudly (with quite a bang) that 36 years is quite long enough to dry things and it quit. I lament its passing. It was like part of the family. I knew its clunks and squeaks so well. I almost don’t want a new one (and probably can’t have one anyway…damn appliance prices!)
Last year I bid farewell to a 22 year old fridge (I am still paying for its replacement hence not being able to buy a dryer). My question is how old is your oldest still functioning appliance?

Congrats to Fisher and Paykel for a well made dryer…if I give you a testemonial will you fix it pleeeeeeeeeeeeease?

Wow! I enjoyed the OP. But have no old appliances.

Earlier this year I said goodbye to a Hoover washing machine which I had bought new 30 years ago when I had my first child. It was a great machine that apart from a few service calls (none very major) in its last few years, served me well. I really miss it. The ‘new’ (second-hand) machine that replaced it just doesn’t have quite the same personality.

Perhaps you might drop by the horse track this afternoon?

That’s impressive for a clothes dryer!

The only appliance in our family that comes within reach of that is a chest freezer purchased circa 1967.

My grandmother had a refrigerator well into the late 70s that was old enough to physically latch shut when you closed it, and had the rounded styling of the late 50s. And my folks just last Christmas laid to rest a microwave oven that they’d bought in the mid '70s when microwave ovens were first commercially available.

My grandmother has an Amana microwave from the late 60’s - two dials, three buttons, and a defrost lever. It still works today, apart from the dial lights and interior light burning out (and they did that only recently). I told her she could sell it on eBay and buy 2 or 3 microwaves with the money. :slight_smile:

After 18 years of service, we finally sent off our first VCR to the great electronics store in the sky. In a more amusing twist, we only had to put it out of service, because we could not get a belt for it. After 18 years, the old belts inside of it wore out, and caused it to no longer work. Otherwise, it ran absolutely perectly, just as well as a brand new VCR. $500 well spent in 1985. I miss that VCR.

And it is not to say that we never used it either, as we have in our house over 1000 Video’s.

It will be missed.

On another note, has anyone else noticed how older appliances seem to be better built, and longer lasting than newer ones? We also have an ancient microwave from the 70’s, a huge GE woodgrained behemoth, and it has served us without fail since purchase.

Yes modro. In past decades appliances were built to last and could be repaired. The trend has been to build them more cheaply and just replace them when they break. There are probably several factors that have brought that trend to bear; one might be the rate at which new technology is developed seems to be ever increasing.

Does a hair dryer count as an appliance? If so, I have my very first one, from the eighties, that I still use nearly every day.

For me it was a clock radio.

Two of my mom’s pals gave me a dicky little clock radio when I graduated high school. I thought it was the dumbest gift on earth.

But damn that thing lasted. I carried it to Frostburg and Kensington MD, Vienna VA, Iowa City IA, Falls Church VA, back to Kensington and then to Purcellville VA. It was the single constant in my life (other than my wife) for more than 15 years. It had scars and dings and even a burn mark (kids…be careful with matches).

That’s a helluva run for a cheap piece of plastic. I miss it still.

My parents have GE microwave with faux-wood styling that they bought when they first got married and moved into the house 25 years ago. The middle row of keys (4,5, and 6) only work some of the time, but other than that it is still going strong.

My parents own a refrigerator that is over 50 years old. Apparently my grandfather bought it at a tractor dealership, ,and when he brought it home, my grandmother was pissed because she didn’t think the International Harvester Corporation could make good refrigerators.

 Well it is still sitting in my parents basement.  It may take longer to cool off then it used to, but it still keeps the beer cold.

The oven in our house is probably as old as the house itself, making it 35 years old. We just replaced the copper wire to the bottom element yesterday, because it keeps wiggling lose, but otherwise, it’s still going strong. I’d love to get a new one, but we don’t want to shell out the $500-1000 for it. The funny thing is, the previous occupants replaced their old stove with an electric smooth-top, but they didn’t touch the oven.

well if you agree to call a wall clock an appliance than thats wat i got for u.my parents got this clock as a wedding gift 27 years ago and its been serving us faithfully since that day.i dont remember our family spending a single dime on it since we got it.(got it confirmed from mom cause i was born 4 years after we started using it).all we need is fresh batteries-once a year and thats it.damn in a couple of years i could put that on ebay antiques section and get enough for a new house i guess!

Newer technology is a factor, but long-term profits are what it’s all about. “Planned obsolecence” has infected virtually every corner of the manufacturing sector. The basic idea is that if items are built to last, or at least well enough to be repaired and used for a long time, the manufacturer can’t make money off of selling you another one. This is why Detroit pushes the idea that a car isn’t supposed to last more than 100,000 miles, even though cars could easily be made that last three times that, and they wouldn’t cost even twice as much to make as they already do.

To answer the OP, the only thing I can think of is an old Aiwa shelf-unit stereo I got for Christmas around 1990. The CD player finally conked out, so now I just run my TV, VCR, and DVD players through it, or listen to my few remaining tapes. Works fine.

Yep seems old is better, in it’s ‘pre-door-dropping-off-days’ the dryer started making a horrific squeal. The guy that came round and de-squealed it said the oldies were worth 3 newies because the newies were built to self destruct.
Interesting side note…all those ancient microwaves!. We have certainly caught up with technology these days and I don’t think we are lacking any new gizmo, but pre very strident govt controls microwaves were something NASA used. I didn’t see my first microwave or VCR till the early 80’s. I am amazed to see how much earlier you guys had them!

Yep seems old is better, in its ‘pre-door-dropping-off-days’ the dryer started making a horrific squeal. The guy that came round and de-squealed it said the oldies were worth 3 newies because the newies were built to self destruct.
Interesting side note…all those ancient microwaves!. We have certainly caught up with technology these days and I don’t think we are lacking any new gizmo, but pre very strident govt controls microwaves were something NASA used. I didn’t see my first microwave or VCR till the early 80’s. I am amazed to see how much earlier you guys had them!

I have a Westminster Radio that belonged to my grandmother - I have no idea how old it is, but it is all valves including one that is called an ‘electric eye’ - protrudes from the front of the case and glows green - it smells terribly of burning dust when switched on, but it works and the tone is wonderful.

My Juice-O-Mat orange juice squeezer is from the 1940’s and still works great, I use it nearly every day.

My toaster and waffle iron are from the 1950’s, use them every week.

One of my sewing machines is from the 1920’s and still works. I use it occasionally. I have a portable sewing machine from the 1880’s, and it works great too, but I rarely use it now.

I have a 1951 television that still works, but I dont “use” it anymore, because it is going to be hard to find new replacement tubes if/when they burn out, so i just test it every few years. We have a box of extra tubes for this tv and for some old record players that we have.

My microwave is from the 1970’s. I have been wanting to replace it for 20 years, but it wont break!