57 scooters+bikes removed from river

Amazing–

How much $$ do the scooter/bike peddlers pay cities for the right to clutter their sidewalks, thereby forcing people in wheelchairs out into the street?

But maybe it’s fun to toss e-scooters into a river…

Portland OR:

"Divers found 57 e-scooters and BIKETOWN bicycles at the bottom of the Willamette River over the past two days.

The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office River Patrol Dive Team recovered the vehicles while cleaning the Willamette River sea wall downtown."

There’s a silent war being waged against e-scooters in Portland and other cities. The companies aren’t complaining so the police aren’t doing anything.

https://www.theolympian.com/news/state/washington/article218697035.html

If users continue to be inconsiderate about where they leave these things, it’s going to get worse.

I saw one at the bottom of the creek near our house (inside the Beltway DC suburb) yesterday. It would surprise me if there weren’t several at the bottom of the Potomac and the Anacostia.

Seems that Portland’s problem is people in wheelchairs getting to the street in the first place.

Sounds like the River needed a Good Bath

https://vimeo.com/170333917

Not all heroes wear capes.

Nashville is about to ban them.

But what about the pollution in the river? I thought Oregonians in general are eco-considerate. That doesn’t add up.

We don’t live in a world of absolutes. There are assholes everywhere. Some places just have a higher concentration of them.

That doesn’t make sense. If you’re going to be an asshole, then go ahead and dump them into the river. But if you’re also eco-sensitive then you’re just being a contradiction and taking a position only when it suits your immediate needs.

It’s situational ethics.

I think what Omar was saying is that the assholes and the eco-sensitive people are not necessarily the same people.

57 Scooters is a lot of lost money.

These companies need to find a solution to blocked sidewalks ASAP if they want to keep their city contracts.

We have a test program with Lime in Little Rock. Only adults 18 and over can use them. The App requires them to scan their ID to prove age.

If so, then he’s surmising that there’s a higher percentage of assholes there. But there’s also a higher percentage of eco-sensitive (for want of a better word) people there too. They likely are not mutually exclusive groups.

Or maybe they are.

But we can drop this, I don’t want to hijack the thread.

Around here, the streets are littered with cars. If I walk out of the office now, there are cars left literally nose-to-tail all the way up the street.

Most of the people I work with think that it would be a good thing if the people who own and use those cars had to pay for the space they use and the ugliness of their presence.

I’m mystified by this. Do the renters not have a deposit to lose? This seems like an absurdly simple solution. Return it or lose a large deposit.

What am I not getting? Are they scattered about to begin with? Or are they rented from a central location?

Sorry, genuine questions here – no snark intended.

Only a guess, but I’d figure that the folks throwing them in the river are not the last one to rent them. You might not be able to ride it without using the App, but couldn’t you just roll it down the block to the water?

Chicago recently allowed them. Big surprise when I saw in the paper this morning that a great many users pay no attention to the “rules.”

18-year-olds are amongst the biggest jackasses. I’ve been nearly knocked over by these people more than once in downtown Detroit because they can’t be arsed to pay attention to people walking down the sidewalk.

Considering how public bathrooms are always clean and well treated, I am shocked to hear that leaving equipment around in public places is not always respected.