Anthropine

ok, i am not even sure if this is how you speel it, but what exactly is Anthropine, that condition that happens to your muscles when you don’t use them very often? Or not at all? What exactly happens? Do the muscles begin deteriorating themselves? r is ther a major build up of Lactic acid, or what?

No offense, kaos, but when you misspell “spell” you’re off to a bad start. :wink:

And I believe the word you were trying to spell is atrophy.


Mmm, sure…listen…
Do you think I could interest you in a pair of zircon-encrusted tweezers?

Here is the Encyclopædia Britannica’s take on the subject:
Atrophy of muscle or of muscle and bone.

If the link doesn’t work, go to
http://www.britannica.com/ , look up “atrophy,” scroll down to the index that is listed below the article, and click on “Atrophy of muscle or of muscle and bone.”


Tom~

Thanks tom!
I understand now. I was just wondering because I saw it on the Matrix last night when I watched it for the 14th time! he he he

Thanks again!

Quick question, how do you quote people?

In your reply, type <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=“1” face=“Verdana, Arial”>code:</font><HR><pre>

after the quoted portion.




See that little link that says "*UBB CODE is ON" on the reply page? It explains such things.

AARGGH! it didn’t work! OK, read the UBB page. yeesh!

Another place that discusses quotes is at:
http://boards.straightdope.com/ubb/Forum2/HTML/000818.html
There is some discussion and are links to other discussions.

well, thanks everyone, I’ll try and get the quotes thingy to work. How do you usually get atrophy?

Atrophy is loss of tissue, most often muscle tissue, from inadequate levels of function. Muscle tissue atrophies when you do not exercise. Medically this occurs when you are forced to remain in bed from illness, or as a result of a loss of motor ability after a trauma. The way to reverse atrophy is to engage in more activity, either voluntary exercise, or passive range of motion. The former is far more efficacious.

Why it occurs is rather complex. The simplest answer is “Use it or loose it.” The body is frugal. Whatever level of use is habitual, for a muscle, or gland, or organ, that level of functionality and a small margin over that are all that the body maintains. Resources are used elsewhere, and the tissue in question dies, one cell at a time. Normal use stimulates the natural replacement processes. When use is great enough to encourage growth faster than the normal processes of cell death, tissue mass increases. The how and what of those processes is the complicated part.

Tris


Imagine my signature begins five spaces to the right of center.

ok, so use it or lose it right? I gotcha now, what about pain? Would it hurt, or you wouldn’t feel anything until you realize you can’t move? THe only way I dould think of it hurting is that if the nerve cells died in the muscles, but that shouldn’t hurt anyways right?