Anyone know the right pen to use for autographing a Kindle?

I’m going to a lecture by one of my favorite authors next week, and I’ like to get her to autograph a book for me. But all my copies are e-books on my Kindle, and I’d like her to autograph that. I’m reluctant to just test a bunch of stuff on it and mess it up, but I thought maybe one of you have already solved this. My first thought is a Sharpie, and my second thought is a brush and some tiny jar of paint of some kind. The back of the Kindle is … let’s say matte black.

Silver sharpie?

Oh, come on. Buy a dead tree copy of one of her books and have her sign that.

Or use a silver sharpie.

But I have 4 of her books on my Kindle. She can sign all 4 with one signature. :slight_smile:

But there are other authors’ works on the kindle, right?

I’ll give you points for clever, but come on.:wink:

In my experience the rule on getting an author’s signature is usually that you qualify by buying a book. I am sure that they will catch up with the digital revolution eventually, but I doubt that day is here yet.

I always figured the rule for getting an author’s signature was being a fan and making the effort to show up and ask for a signature.

Besides, an autographed Kindle is basically going to advertise that author every time Boyo Jim pulls it out on the subway. Why wouldn’t she be thrilled to autograph something so permanent?

I don’t find it all that odd. Wasn’t there an I-pod that had the signatures of U2 on it?

An autographed kindle will decrease in value.

Sharpie is a brand; it’s not a type of ink/paint.

You want a paint pen.

http://www.michaels.com/painting/paint-pens/845162977

This is interesting – the idea of the value of the Kindle changing. I was talking about it with my car pool this morning. My idea was that once a Kindle dies (and it’s quite old), it’s worth nothing. But if it’s an autographed dead Kindle, it might be worth … something.

Anyway, on what do you base your opinion? Or have you found some evidence that makes this a fact?

I’ve bought 4 of her books. They’re just in a non-paper form.

Sure, but in common parlance for at least the last few decades it means Sharpie brand permanent marker. I, too, would have thought a silver Sharpie permanent marker would work fine.

Thanks, I’ve found this.. I’ll go to the local store and see if I can buy less than a six pack of them.

I have an autographed NFL football, signed by a friend of mine who is a retired player. I’ve shown it to friends and tossed it around over the years and the signature is wearing away. I keep meaning to get him to autograph another.

Spraying a fixative on it afterwards might help keep it from deteriorating, though I don’t know how those do on plastic, they’re generally used for paper. You could also put a clear decal over it to preserve the signature.

Since the market for autographed Kindles is rather thin, I don’t have any cites. But, since you asked, in my opinion an autographed book has a higher likelihood of appreciating in value than an obsolete Kindle, whether autographed or not.

Which is why I chimed in.

Many Sharpies are not permanent markers – even ones that we traditionally think of as ‘permanent’ - so saying ‘Sharpie’ nowadays and sending someone to grab one will very often result in a common and not-very-permanent marker. Even when their most common marker was ‘permanent’, I still wouldn’t say it was best suited for the task at hand.
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One of my friends says I should buy a Kindle cover and get that autographed. I expect it has about the same issues – maybe more if its some kind of textured faux-leather thing. Any thoughts on whether this would be preferable?

Sharpie does make paint pens, which I have used to good effect in the past to write permanent labels on smooth plastic and metal surfaces. The paint is oil-based, is not alcohol-soluble, and does not rub off as easily as regular Sharpie marker ink.

Amazon link to 5-pack

There are also finer-tipped versions; the thick ones have a blunt tip about 1/8" across.

They are not quite as simple to use as a standard Sharpie, though - they have to be shaken to mix up the paint, and the tip has to be pushed in and held down for a moment to get the paint flowing. If the tip isn’t charged properly you get a flow of solvent without pigment in it, or a big drop of paint that smears easily. I usually start the pen working on a piece of scrap paper, then move to the project surface after the paint flow is stable. The paint also takes several minutes to dry completely.

Despite these drawbacks, I haven’t found a system that works better for durability, color intensity and opacity, and portability. The metallics really do leave a bright looking finish, much nicer than the regular Sharpie metallic ink.

ETA: what Philster said