Being an honest Nigerian must suck.

I’m going to do a training thing somewhere in Europe next week. We have people coming from lots of places. I don’t think the Nigerians will make it.

They’ve paid - a few grand. We have their money. They’re real. I’ve met some of their colleagues.

They just can’t get visas. It’s easy for me - I don’t even need one.

They need to visit the embassy to get visas. The embassy is so swamped with scammers they won’t see people without an appointment. They won’t make an (online) appointment without a deposit. The banks in Nigeria won’t take their money.

I don’t know why they won’t - maybe they’re overwhelmed by scammers too, or maybe they think their reputation’s going to get sullied by scammers, or maybe the European country’s just pretending that it’s possible to get a visa when really it isn’t at all.

And I can’t do anything for them. I’ve had their stuff translated into the appropriate language. I’ve had stuff faxed from us, and from our people at the European end. No response.

And the worst thing is when I read their emails, it still sounds like a scam.

If I recall correctly Nigerians also have a higher-than-average rate of jumping their visa and disappearing than many other countries, hence all the restrictions in the first place.

There are many, many honest Nigerians - I’ve even met a few - but by golly their less scrupulous counterparts sure make life difficult.

A while ago, I posted a question in GQ asking how legitimate Nigerian businesspeople manage to operate, especially those that might need to order equipment or parts from foreign providers. Search seems to be down, but I can’t find the thread.

To be honest, if I owned something like a widget company, and I got an order from Nigeria, I’d refuse unless they paid in cash - US currency, not a wire transfer, bank check, or any other form of payment. I’d even check to see if the money was counterfeit.

A while ago, I posted a question in GQ asking how legitimate Nigerian businesspeople manage to operate, especially those that might need to order equipment or parts from foreign providers. Search seems to be down, but I can’t find the thread.

To be honest, if I owned something like a widget company, and I got an order from Nigeria, I’d refuse unless they paid in cash - US currency, not a wire transfer, bank check, or any other form of payment. I’d even check to see if the money was counterfeit.

A while ago, I posted a question in GQ asking how legitimate Nigerian businesspeople manage to operate, especially those that might need to order equipment or parts from foreign providers. Search seems to be down, but I can’t find the thread.

To be honest, if I owned something like a widget company, and I got an order from Nigeria, I’d refuse unless they paid in cash - US currency, not a wire transfer, bank check, or any other form of payment. I’d even check to see if the money was counterfeit.

A while ago, I posted a question in GQ asking how legitimate Nigerian businesspeople manage to operate, especially those that might need to order equipment or parts from foreign providers. Search seems to be down, but I can’t find the thread.

To be honest, if I owned something like a widget company, and I got an order from Nigeria, I’d refuse unless they paid in cash - US currency, not a wire transfer, bank check, or any other form of payment. I’d even check to see if the money was counterfeit.

I once had a Nigerian client applying for an H-1B visa. She had a Nigerian undergrad degree, and a master’s in computer science from a reputable U.K. university. A U.S. Fortune 100 company had hired her and was filing the H-1B petition for her.

We got a Request for Evidence from INS, asking for additional proof that her Nigerian undergrad degree was legit, even though she had a subsequent degree that they otherwise never would have questioned, and obviously could do the job and had several years of prior experience, or she never would have gotten the offer to begin with. My boss wrote a scathing letter to Immigration, stopping just short of calling them a bunch of bigots. The petition was eventually approved.