Bush blocks travels of lawmakers.

What law empowers Bush to block elected legislators to travel to North Korea?

Anyone here know of any law or any party discipline enabling Bush to prevent elected lawmakers from making a trip to North Korea?

Susma Rio Sep

[Don’t post the full text of copyrighted articles, Susma, post a link or short excerpts ONLY. --Gaudere]

I’m not aware of any such law (which isn’t to say there isn’t one, there certainly is for Cuba) but the disapproval of the executive branch and the concommitant use of executive powers to express that disapproval can be a powerful deterrent. “Well, Congresswoman Jones, the President would like to release the funds for that pet program of yours in your district which would guarantee your re-election, but there’s that troubling trip to North Korea you’re planning this month…”

Susma:

First: Before the Mods open some whoop-ass on you, I would suggest you stop quoting more than a paragraph or two of articles such as this (as you did in the Mahathir thread, too).

Newspapers and websites have to PAY the AP for the use of such material, and unauthorized reproduction is theft. The Chicago Reader (owners of the SDMB) don’t like that.

Second: Re: the OP–Although I don’t know the exact law, I believe that the Executive Branch has the power to restrict the travel of any of its citizens to foreign countries. Just b/c they’re lawmakers doesn’t make them immune to this. They’re not allowed to break any other laws just b/c they’re lawmakers (well … in theory … there are all of those stories of congressmen getting stopped for DUI all the time and being let go …).

Here’s more:

The U.S. Treasury Dept.'s (part of the executive branch) Office of Foreign Assets Control

http://www.ustreas.gov/offices/eotffc/ofac/

http://www.treas.gov/offices/eotffc/ofac/sanctions/nkorea.txt

Here’s more:

The U.S. Treasury Dept.'s (part of the executive branch) Office of Foreign Assets Control

http://www.ustreas.gov/offices/eotffc/ofac/
http://www.ustreas.gov/offices/eotffc/ofac/legal/regs/31cfr500.pdf

So it looks as though travel is technically legal, so long as you don’t buy more than $100 worth of personal goods while there. I guess it’s just political pressure on Bush’s part, to keep the shaky diplomatic efforts focused.

The Bush administration is in the midst of ticklish negotiations with the N. Koreans over nuclear weapons and such. Rep. Weldon, being a Republican, graciously agreed not to barge into the touchy situation. I don’t think there’s any more to it than that.